Happy Birthday to...Me?

Please wait, I'm thinking
I recently attended a training and the presenter asked us all to introduce ourselves and then share one thing about us that would not be on our résumé. I instantly went into panic mode and could not think of one thing about myself to contribute. Luckily, my colleagues came to the rescue and offered this unique information about me when I was failing. My response was, “One thing that is not on my résumé is that when I am put on the spot to answer a question about myself, I totally forget who I am and what I like.”

For instance, I’ll never forget the time I was in gym class when I was in second grade. It was January 12. To make teams, the PE teacher had us line up and tell him the date of our birthdays. I was third in line, and he wanted this to happen very quickly. When he pointed at me, I said: “January 15.” (My birthday is September 23.)

I was horrified when he responded, “Oh! Your birthday is only a few days away!” He then proceeded to let me pick whatever team I wanted, and I was first in line for everything. Then the worst (but kind) thing happened on January 15...he had the whole class sing “Happy Birthday” to me.

Birthday Balloons


I mention this story as a reminder to give students multiple ways to respond to your requests, alleviating many of the barriers to expression. This will allow students to access themselves. Even if we feel our requested tasks are simple things to ask of our students, we must also make it simple for them to respond.

Being cognizant that some students may struggle with verbal responses for various reasons can be a game changer in getting to know our students and allowing them to open up to their peers. It may not even be a struggle to express; but a matter of their own processing time as we hurriedly skip them or show frustration, translating their actions into defiance.

This coincides with the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principle of offering multiple means of action and expression. Having a universally designed environment in all areas, all locations, all subjects, all the time within the walls of your schools is essential for equitable education.

Just a few examples to start or continue;

  • Get to know your students. Ask them how they like to respond.

  • Have visuals available for responses.

  • Allow students to write or use speech-to-text (STT) responses.

  • Using backchannels in your classroom are not only a beneficial way to remove the barriers of anxiety of having to verbally respond on the spot; but they are also a good way to expand the classroom outside of school hours. There are many free tools to make that happen.

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Comments 2

Guest - Laurel Blough on Thursday, 02 March 2017 18:03

Kelli,
I connected completely with your dilemma in your opening paragraph, as I also have a tendency to shut down when asked on the spot to say something about myself. (Always prepared heavily for that question in job interviews!) You are absolutely right that we all need to consider alternative response modes for students, because not all students are good at answering verbally on-the-spot. Great reminder!

Laurel

Kelli, I connected completely with your dilemma in your opening paragraph, as I also have a tendency to shut down when asked on the spot to say something about myself. (Always prepared heavily for that question in job interviews!) You are absolutely right that we all need to consider alternative response modes for students, because not all students are good at answering verbally on-the-spot. Great reminder! Laurel
Guest - Dee Suding on Thursday, 02 March 2017 19:56

Kelli, I wish I had had someone like you around when I was teaching. Keep up the grat work. Love ya

Kelli, I wish I had had someone like you around when I was teaching. Keep up the grat work. Love ya
Guest
Monday, 16 July 2018

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