The Pie of Life and A2E

The Access to Education (A2E) State Conference, formerly PATINS State Conference, is right around the corner! Woo! Hoo! What does that mean to us? High energy, reuniting with people we haven’t seen for a while, meeting new folks. We will learn so much during these two intense days. So much information, so little time.

There is a nifty chart, called the Pie of Life. I picked it up from a book called Values Clarification (Values Clarification, by Dr. Sidney B. Simon, Leland W Howe). This particular exercise involves a blank circle. The key is defined by what you do in your 24 hour day. You start by listing the activities of your day, and then assign time values to them. Once done, you plot the circle. So for simplicity, I have listed these general areas with four hours each: Leisure, Community, Family, Self, Work/School and Home.  

Pie Chart of 24 hours in a day
It is a lot easier when given tidy parameter such as these.  

When we just list what we do in a day or want to do in a day, it is easier to come up with numbers well off the chart. But even so, given these categories, this individual still came up with 28.5 hours in a day, as noted by bar chart below.
Bar Chart of Hours we think we have in a dayPie Chart of Hours we think we have in a day with percentages
It makes sense of course that work/school and sleep should take up the lion’s share of a person’s day. After all, learning and growing is the “job” of students. The point here is to look at that balance. I think of this when I consider homework for students, and especially homework for students with special needs. From my perspective, it is more of an economy of time and effort and less of a Three Musketeers "All for one and one for all" approach. We know that some of the students must work, some are athletes, active in community/church works, some have medical needs that take time. We know all students must show evidence of learning. So, if some students can access homework or schoolwork differently or produce the evidence of their work at a different time or by a different means, then outcomes of learning may be better demonstrated and measured. As a society we do encourage well-rounded students so they will be well-rounded, contributing adults, participating fully in their communities. So in this scenario, here is what a 24 hour day can look like for students.

Bar Chart of Student 24 Daily hours
As we enter this next week of wonderful exploration into the world of assistive technology, curricular access and attempt to synthesize it all, let’s remember.  You, personally, do not have to know everything about access. Be comfortable in knowing resources are available to assist with solutions that may elude you as you teach a diverse classroom. That is what we do at PATINS. Take advantage of what other conference attendees and presenters also know.

All these nifty charts are intended to show that there is so much for all of us to learn. Both adult and children learners. It is helpful to always view information from a perspective of a feature match. By that I mean, does an item/product/technique match the needs/abilities of the the user and meet the intended outcome? or How will this help my student more efficiently/effectively complete an important task using a useful skill?

When not helping to put on the Access to Education (A2E) conference, I will be looking for technology and supports to help students and staff blossom given their strengths. We know students have had plenty of practice demonstrating the areas of their disability. Now, with my nifty Pie of Life exercise, it is clear that no one has any time to waste reinforcing the areas of difficulty. Let’s focus precious time on growing those well-rounded students so they will be well-rounded, contributing adults, participating fully in their communities with time, energy and satisfaction enough to take on the next generation of children for whom the Pie of Life will mean something.
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Monday, 16 July 2018

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