Jun
21

People First Language

While Spring cleaning this week, I came across a Syllabus from a Journalism Class I had nearly 40 years ago. It included a discussion on People First Language (PFL). This professor I had called it “A Person, not a Problem”. We were learning how to write descriptions of people without making their backgrounds or beliefs an issue. As the professor explained various phrases we shouldn’t use, there was one piece of advice that really stuck with me. It was this: “Don’t refer to people as being a certain thing.” The professor explained, “Write about them as people who have whatever IT may be.” Such as:
  • A woman who has cancer, not a cancer victim.
  • A man living in the county illegally, not an illegal alien.
  • People without homes, not the homeless.
  • A returning citizen, not an ex-con.
  • A woman with a mental health condition, not an insane woman.
Fast forward 20 years as I started working in Education. I applied this PFL mindset to persons with disabilities, with one realization. Words do Matter. I was bothered by the phrase my professor used “A Person, not a Problem”. My unscientific study of language revealed that the #1 word used about people with disabilities is “problem.” And the problem with “problem” is that it’s also the #1 word that activates exclusion.

Here are a few more respectful PFL examples:
  • People with Disabilities instead of Disabled or Handicapped People.
  • Student with Autism instead of Autistic Student.
  • Woman with a Visual Impairment instead of Blind Woman.
  • Accessible Parking instead of Handicapped Parking.
To learn more on People First Language, check out ARC of Indiana and Disability is Natural.

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Mar
21

Socks

This may seem like an odd topic to come from a professional staff member of a Project that helps students and teachers learn and teach in a fun, accessible way, right!?… not really. Here’s what I have noticed.

Socks can be fun. I have always enjoyed expressing myself through my sock selection. I’ve even noticed our Director, Daniel, enjoys wearing creative, colorful socks. We’ve had a few enlightening conversations over socks. In fact, I decided pink flamingo socks would be the perfect birthday gift for him last year and he concurred with his reaction once received.

My Kindergarten grandson just experienced Silly Sock Day at school. Ok, I get it…people young and old(er) get a kick out of showing off their personalities through their chosen socks.

Socks can be accessible. What? 

Let me explain. This year, I came across John’s Crazy Socks. I read and felt inspired by John, a young man with Down Syndrome. I read his story and mission which screams accessibility. The key statement John makes regarding accessibility is: We want to show the world what is possible. We want to show the world what people with differing abilities can do when given a chance. We know that people with differing abilities are ready, willing and able to work. We make this happen in ways large and small.

My interest was piqued when I learned of the late President George H. W. Bush’ involvement with John’s Crazy Socks. President Bush has longed championed the rights of people with disabilities. John’s desire to connect with people through socks led John and President Bush to form a bond over their love of crazy socks and their commitment to the possibilities in all of us.

Come to the PATINS/IN*SOURCE Tech Expo on April 4th for a chance to win a pair of John’s Crazy Socks. It’s not too late to register. Four pairs of John’s Crazy Socks will be part of the lineup of many Door Prizes available to our attendees. 2 pairs of Autism Awareness Socks and 2 pairs of Down Syndrome Awareness Socks. 

We will also have Exhibitors available to you for those specific disabilities and many more. Please join us for a day of professional learning and fun.

Today is a meaningful day to post my blog…March 21, 3:21 World Down Syndrome Day. This is a day we celebrate all who have Down Syndrome. We celebrate their accomplishments and the joy they bring to the world. World Down Syndrome Day is celebrated on March 21st for 3 copies of the 21st chromosome (which is what causes Down Syndrome)

Happy 3:21!

   



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Sandy Stabenfeldt
Good job Glenda! Who doesn't love socks!
Monday, 25 March 2019 12:42
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Dec
07

Never Give Up

This week I have invited a Guest Blogger to share with us. His name is Collin Clarke. Before I share his story in his own words, allow me to tell you how I came across Collin.

I was first introduced to Collin through an A&E TV Special entitled “Born This Way” earlier this year. 

The things I learned about Collin after watching that TV special are:
  • Collin is a fit young man
  • Collin is a bodybuilder. (Men’s Health Magazine sought him out to be featured on this Health and Fitness episode)
  • Collin is from Evansville, IN
  • Collin has Down Syndrome. In Collin’s words: “God made me like this for a reason”
  • Collin has a supportive family and set of friends. Father Carter Clarke said the family has always pushed Collin to succeed. Sometimes that has meant pushing those around him to accept his “no limits” attitude. “We are very blessed with Collin. He doesn’t see any barriers in life. We’ve always tried to avoid putting limits on him. If he wanted to do something, we were always all for it”.
  • Collin’s personality drew me in, kept me glued to the TV and inspired me to never give up on anything I want to do, want to be, want to accomplish.
Now, here’s Collin himself to tell you his story. Enjoy the read and remember to …

Never Give Up.

My name is Collin Clarke, I am 25 years old and I am a bodybuilder. I became a bodybuilder in 2015 after watching John Cena and other bodybuilders like Arnold Schwarzenegger. I was over 200 pounds. I competed at 137 pounds after 7 months of hard training and diet.

Collin Before and After Bodybuilding in 2015. Bodybuilding changed my life emotionally and physically. It feels so good to be healthy and to make good changes in my diet and be more active.


I try to inspire others to make changes to become healthier. I have many friends and family who support me and help me when the diet gets hard or I am tired or need a reminder that I am strong.
Collin's Family and Friend 2016. I believe in never giving up and listening to my heart and give it everything I got.


I am inspired by many people. People with disabilities, people in the military, family and friends who want me to be my best.

I love being a role model for young kids, to let them know they can do anything or be anything with heart and passion and believing in themselves. I love when parents come up to me and say because of you my child wants to be like you.

I want to keep bodybuilding and getting better. I look for positive in every day and want others to do the same - believe in their ability and to not get distracted by a disability (label).

I have an extra chromosome, a big heart and will keep dreaming and believing and I will never give up!


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Sandy Stabenfeldt
What a fantastic guest speaker and blog entry. We are very proud of Collin here in Evansville! Thank you so much for sharing wit... Read More
Friday, 07 December 2018 11:16
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Aug
29

Tea anyone?

teapot with cup and milk
I’m a tea drinker. I appreciate tea. Tea making has been called many things: a celebration, an ancient rite, refreshment for the stress of life. 


My late grandmother taught me some tea-making secrets, such as knowing that the preparation of the tea affects the taste. Traditionally, the milk was poured into the cup first, then the tea. The taste is much different when you pour the tea first and follow it with the milk.

I always enjoy watching as the tea is immersed in the water. Every inch of exposed tea is saturated. Almost magically, the water begins to change color. First, there are light amber ribbons of tea color. Soon they become larger and deeper. The water is infused with the rich brown flavor. Slowly, the water becomes something new to be savored and enjoyed.

The miracle of a cup of tea reminds me of the way the process of learning can change a life. Like the tea… knowledge, experiences, conquered tasks, access to content, enhanced senses are all part of that process that permeates the very heart of each learner. Slowly at first, growing stronger as we apply what we learn, our lives begin to change…infused with something new…something better.

This week we kicked off our 18-19 AEMing for Achievement Grant recipients, eight new Indiana school districts, as they strive to bring their respective districts into compliance and improve student performance with the assistance of PATINS.

Enjoy a cup of tea this week with me.... cheers!

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May
24

Navigating around Barriers

Picture of a Road Map
Did you know that the first week of April is “Read a Road Map” week? Given that emphasis, it seems logical to me that the following week should be “How to fold a Road Map” week!
(I sense you are nodding your head in agreement)


Perhaps the advent of GPS will make road maps obsolete someday. One thing is for sure - no matter what form of navigational technology is available in the future, we’ll always need direction in our lives.

Guidance systems are helpful but they don’t remove roadblocks, do they? They DO assist with navigating around obstacles so we can reach our destination.

Picture of a Brick Wall

Education is like that…there may be barriers to the process of learning but there are ways to navigate around or through those barriers so we can reach our goals. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) guarantees the right to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) for students with disabilities. If you need assistance breaking through or navigating around barriers in education for yourself or for a student in your life, contact a PATINS staff member for some ideas.

 

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Feb
24

A Matter of Trust


My five-year-old grandson, Rhett, was spending the night with me recently. Upon waking up the next morning in his bed, I heard his little voice say in the darkened house “Miss Kaylan?”. 

You see, Miss Kaylan is his Preschool Teacher. 

Preschool teacher Miss Kaylan with 5-year old grandson Rhett
As I trekked down the hallway to greet Rhett to the new day, I was touched that he chose to call out for his teacher rather than Momma, Daddy or Gigi (that’s me!). He obviously was disoriented waking up in the dark and trusted that Miss Kaylan was there to lead the way for him to a safe place, a comfortable place. 

Teachers are leaders. 

Why would anyone want to be a teacher, anyway? Some seek the position because they enjoy the control of the classroom that almost certainly accompanies. Others become teachers because the rewards seem attractive. Still others accept a role of teacher out of a sense of duty, obligation or pay it forward mindset. 

There is nothing wrong with any of these motives. After all, an effective leader quite naturally acquires power and knows how to handle it. And all leaders should be rewarded for their efforts, right? Furthermore, a strong sense of duty compels leaders to do their best. But too much emphasis on any of the three separates the leader from the people eventually…one more motive is essential, and that is service. 

A leader who has a genuine desire to touch people’s lives for the better, to serve that is – one who sees the needs and wants to be part of the solution – empowers others.

My role in PATINS is to support and serve the Staff and our Stakeholders as they lead all students to an accessible curriculum. You can trust that I am behind the scenes purchasing needed items in our Lending Library, purchasing training resources for our Specialists, planning and implementing our next Professional Development Event to enhance knowledge base and support compliance for student success. All the while, working with the PATINS Director to be fiscally responsible with our budget and funding.

May everything you do revolve around service to others. You are a leader.



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Sandy Stabenfeldt
Great blog post!
Monday, 26 February 2018 14:53
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Jul
28

Leftie or Rightie?

Left arm lifted holding a pencil

Is your dominant hand left, or right? I’m a definite leftie. I am part of the 10-12% in this world that function stronger with their left hand. On the PATINS staff, Julie and Jim join me as lefties.


Some cultures consider left handed people as an outcast. The Anglo-Saxon word for left is “lyft” which means broken, weak. A mere nasty habit to overcome. This might explain why, as an elementary student, I was pulled out of my classroom of peers to go out in the hall and work on writing with my right hand with Miss O’Neil, the “special teacher”. I wasn’t comfortable writing with my right hand nor did I have good results with my right hand. I also remember being sad that I was missing out on what my friends were doing in my classroom with my teacher. Miss O’Neil told my parents that I would always need a pencil gripper to properly write. (That turned out to be incorrect)

In this right-handed world, I have learned to adapt quite effectively. Here’s a few examples:
  • My coffee mug with the inspirational saying? I’m glad you can read it as I drink.
  • Opening those cans with a can opener? I buy the pull tops.
  • Zipping a zipper? Skilled at holding that fly/flap with my other fingers to keep clear.
  • Reading a measuring cup? Mastered the metric system.
  • Spiral notebook? Built a tolerance to dents from resting on the spiral or went for the loose-leaf.
  • Writing over pencil/pen on my paper? Those smudges on the butt of my hand are washable.
  • Cutting with scissors? Not so great UNTIL my first left-handed pair, then perfect!
  • Reading a tape measure? I can read upside down and get the job done.
  • Video Game Controller? Wasn’t any good at video games anyway.
  • Desk in school? I was all smiles when I was introduced to a left-handed desk in college. Until then, I preferred to sit on the floor with my work on my knees or lap.
Studies show that lefties are better at using both hands proficiently over righties. Seems our brains are wired to do this. That explains why I can use my ten-key calculator with my right hand at lightning speed as well as a mouse with my right hand.

If you want some more fun facts on lefties, check out this short video. In the meantime, be mindful of lefties in your circles. If you are a teacher, try to be open to flexible seating options. Keep in mind what it is you are trying to assess and then let the student demonstrate his/her individual ability to conquer the task. If only Miss O'Neil would have checked out my penmanship as a leftie... we both might have put our time to better use.

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Apr
19

The Party's Over

 PATINS staff photo with the words keep calm and smile with friends poster

Last week, PATINS hosted a party. Well, not really a party, but Tech Expo 2017… and it had components of a party:

· Invitation and RSVP
· Theme/decorations
· Food
· Lively conversation
· Meeting new people
· Seeing friends/colleagues
· Laughter
· Activities
· Goodie bag/gifts
· Photo opportunities

As the Event & Financial Manager, it is my responsibility to plan the event in a fiscally responsible manner as well as coordinate the efforts of the venue, staff and exhibitors to serve the attendees to the best of our ability.

Looking over feedback that has come back to us, it seems we provided a valuable day of learning and professional development for the teachers, support staff, administrators and parents that were in attendance. For those of you who joined us, thank you! For those of you who didn’t make it, we will offer Tech Expo once again in April 2018 with an Exhibit Hall full of experts in the field of technology and a day full of presentations exploring how to implement those products and services in the classroom.

Daniel has a phrase he encourages us to use as a focal point in our PATINS positions…Faces, tiny little faces. In my position, I do not get out into the classrooms to see the students’ faces, but, I do appreciate having a hand in a successful professional development event, such as Tech Expo, where I am able to see the faces of eager educators taking away new ideas and product supports to their schools where they will undoubtedly increase student achievement.

Lastly, a party is a celebration and Tech Expo felt like that at the end of the day. We can all celebrate when the students we serve succeed in the classroom as well as outside of the classroom!


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Jan
06

Happy New Year!


Out with the old, in with the new. Well, not really. Many people, places and things stay right with us as we make that leap into a new year on the calendar.

Time does fly though… as they say.

I moved to Indiana from Illinois in 2000. My mind calculates that as 17 years ago, however; it sure doesn’t seem that long ago in my heart. One experience of moving and becoming familiar with a new community is worthy of sharing with you today.

Shortly after settling into our neighborhood, it was time to find a church. We visited several and found one that was a good fit for our family of four. It didn’t take long for me to notice a steady stream of spelling errors on our changeable roadside sign. It was usually a simple matter of switching a few letters around. However; I was concerned about the frequency of the errors. I inquired with the church secretary to learn that our sign keeper had dyslexia.

I was intrigued and wanted to meet this sign keeper. 

“John” was a smart young man of 14. He had a big smile and a willing spirit. He was outgoing and confident and had no reservations talking with me. He admitted he was good with numbers and not so good with letters. We quickly became pals and I would help him make his idea for the sign a reality.  This seemed to take away some frustration for him and bring out that smile of accomplishment. I can truly say John was my first friend in my new community! Our friendship grew to a mentoring role for me. I not only met with him to develop his sign weekly for the church, but we would also go over his homework. I enjoyed helping him with his reading and writing and his mother appreciated the extra attention given to her son. We both knew John had the potential to be successful in the working world. With his intellect and dynamite personality, all he needed was a few strategies and techniques in which to assist him in his reading comprehension and implementing thoughts to paper.  

John is now a husband, father and Chemist for Eli Lilly and Company. He doesn't attend my church anymore, but we stay in contact with each other. He still refers to me as "Miss Glenda," and I'm honored to know him and call him my friend.

Some people might wonder whether a change in sign keepers was in order. Our sign keeper may have mixed up a few letters now and then, but he was (and is) the epitome of a willing servant. It is often those with lesser talents or disabilities who prove to be the most diligent and effective in a given situation.

If you’d like to know more about Dyslexia, check out our Lending Library Resources or ask one of our Specialists.     

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Sandy Stabenfeldt
Great post Glenda! Thank you for sharing. This is a wonderful story, just like you!
Monday, 09 January 2017 08:19
Bev Sharritt
Delightful story --everyone needs a Miss Glenda!
Tuesday, 17 January 2017 12:12
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Sep
16

Laundry Day

While doing my laundry recently, I pulled my PATINS shirt out of the dryer and ran my hand gently over the embroidered PATINS logo on the sleeve.  My mind went to the blog Julie wrote a couple weeks ago about PATINS.  I wondered, “How did this Project get started back in 1995 anyway?“

I decided my best source to ask was the woman who hired me back in 2004, Vicki HershmanHead shot of Vicki Hershman. 
I knew Vicki was in on the grass roots of this Project retiring as Director in 2012 as well as my mentor and lifetime friend.  It was time to pick her brain for the details.  After treating her to lunch one day, I started asking her questions.  It was touching to see the spark in her eye and obvious drive of seeing ALL children succeed still in her demeanor, after being out of the PATINS trenches for a few years. 

Vicki shared that in 1988, States were given dollars through a Federal Tech Act Systems Change Initiative to increase student access to curriculum.  Indiana’s solution was to set up a Lending Library of Technology in South Bend.  This attempt was unsuccessful due to no structure, no supervision and no training available.

 In 1990, they moved the Lending Library to Valparaiso as if logistics would help.  Change of logistics of the Lending Library did not improve student access at all. 

Along came IDEA Part B requiring schools to do something to increase student access to curriculum or lose Federal Funding.  To get a plan together, in 1994, the Director of West Central Joint Services Cooperative, Shirley Amond and Bob Marra, IN Department of Education Special Ed Superintendent created a task force to research what other States were doing to increase student access. 

The task force was comprised of: 
  •     IN School for the Blind Superintendent
  •      East Allen Special Ed Director
  •      Crown Point Special Ed Director
  •      Madison Special Ed Director
  •      Evansville Special Ed Director
  •       Voc Rehab Director
  •       Shirley, representing WCJS, Wayne Township, Indianapolis
  •       Bob, representing IDOE
It didn’t take long for the task force to realize that they needed a special someone to be in charge of Student Access for the State of Indiana.  Someone to develop a state-wide system to offer hardware and software to teachers to assist their students as well as training for these teachers.  Shirley hired that special someone in 1995…Vicki.  Together, they came up with the acronym PATINS and the framework to work statewide for student access to their curriculum.  It was a natural decision to set up five regional lending libraries in East Allen, Crown Point, Indianapolis, Madison and Evansville and to hire staff for each regional location.

One of those original staff members was Tina Jones from Madison.Head shot of Tina Jones  I called Tina and asked her about her first days with PATINS. 

“I was hired and given an office equipped with a desk, a chair and a stack of assistive technology catalogs.  I didn’t even know what assistive technology was!  Email was brand new too.  So, I spent the first 3 months of my PATINS career reading AT catalogs cover to cover.  You can learn a lot from those catalogs!    After that, I emailed all the vendors I had just read about and they instructed me on how to use the devices they were selling.  I equipped my lending library with the latest and greatest and hit the road-teaching teachers.  As I trained a teacher to help a kid, it was like a wheel with spokes…it spread.  I was hooked on helping kids access their school needs using technology.” 

The law was revised in 1995 with more specific regulations and it was PATINS responsibility to comply.  By 2004, the emphasis was on not only technology, but instruction as well.  Universal Design for Learning was born! 

In 1996, Vicki, Walt and a local cardiologist started volunteering their time to refurbish donated computers and distribute them to needy children in schools.  In 2004, funding was established to hire a manager for this program.  Refurbished Computer Program was born!

As awareness of diverse disabilities increased, Vicki turned to her friend and colleague Leslie Durst at ISB.   Vicki and Leslie followed legislature and studied Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM). They worked on ways to help ALL students with disabilities.  In 2006, they presented the idea of IN Center for Accessible Materials to IDOE.  ICAM was born!

I asked Vicki why she thought PATINS has been so successful over the years?  Without hesitation, she answered PATINS has always had a dedicated staff who had the same focus – believe in the students and do what it takes to reach the potential of each student.

Since 1995, PATINS has changed its acronym a time or two, our logo design and a few shop locations.  Tina retired from PATINS the same year Vicki did, 2012.  If fact, we’ve had 39 talented employees come through our doors with a current staff of 17.

 People, places and things may have changed but the foundation and focus of what we do never has… it’s all about the children we serve.  Those faces, tiny little faces.
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Jun
23

Special Needs featured on the Big Screen!

Disney PIXAR blockbuster Finding Dory opened this week.  If you haven’t had the chance to see this sequel to Finding Nemo, it is well worth your time and admission cost.  It MAY even remind you of a student you know, family member… or yourself!   

Dory The movie is about an adorable, but forgetful, blue tang fish named Dory, a fan favorite character from Finding Nemo.  This sequel clearly suggests that Dory’s short-term memory loss is more than a quirk; Dory has a special need.  It is easy to see that Dory’s special need hasn’t impaired her popularity at all and she is no less lovable with Ellen DeGeneres as the voice behind that cute face.  Dory has a positive attitude despite her challenges.  She identifies her strengths and finds ways to work with them. 

In flashbacks, Dory’s memory lapses are presented as something she was born with and learns to manage.  Her parents build seashell trails to help her find her way home, role play how to engage peers in social settings and tearfully wonder if she will be OKAY on her own.  (What parent hasn’t had that same thought about their child?)  They repeat the phrase “Just Keep Swimming” over and over again so she can hopefully recall that one action in case of danger.  Her ocean buddies have their own sets of challenges:  Destiny the shark has impaired vision, Bailey the whale struggles with echolocation, Hank the octopus deals with anxiety and Nemo has that undersized fin.

Her teacher, Mr. Ray, is reluctant to take Dory on field trips for fear she will wander away from the group.  This is consistent with how some caregivers choose to interact with children who have developmental disabilities.  Instead of providing options and structure that allow kids to function within their abilities, they tend to exclude them from any group activity. 

PIXAR’s willingness to give disability such high-profile exposure is pivotal in the conversation of Special Needs and Universal Design for ALL.  Their message in this movie is acceptance of everyone and their differences.  We see that in the end, it’s not about the direction Dory swims in, or how she gets there – it’s that she just keeps swimming.  It might take her a little longer, but the way she gets there is no less valuable than how anyone else gets there.  

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Glenda Thompson
A good phrase to keep in mind, indeed! I think this movie will open the eyes of many children and adults to the world of adaptati... Read More
Friday, 24 June 2016 12:30
Glenda Thompson
Hey, everyone...Finding Dory passed $300 million in domestic box office sales after just 12 DAYS of release - a pace that could ma... Read More
Saturday, 02 July 2016 11:15
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Apr
12

I love games!

I love games!

  Board games, card games, puzzles, word search, playground games, game shows, pinball, and sporting events.  I enjoy being a participant OR a spectator.

I was a high school cheerleader (not gymnastic at all, just an encourager at heart) and I’m that family member that always suggests, “Let’s play a game!  Corn hole, Euchre, Trivial Pursuit anyone? “

I thrive on the comradery of teamwork or the self-satisfaction of a solo attempt.  Games keep my brain sharp, my self-confidence up and my humility in check.   They are a fun way to engage, learn, be active and/or socialize.   Whether there is a prize at the end of the game or not, I want for that THRILL of the victory…or accept that AGONY of the defeat.  After all, good sportsmanship is a valued lesson in life.

This year at PATINS Tech Expo we are providing a game for our attendees.  It is a QR Code Scavenger Hunt!  Quick Response (QR) Codes can be read with a QR reader.  There are many free readers out there to download to your device. e.g. Bakodo, SCAN, I-Nigma, Kaywa.
QR Blog Code  We are giving this a try at Tech Expo with the hope of engaging fun and providing attendees a chance to win an iPad Pro/Keyboard/Pencil from our Treasure Chest at the end of the day.  Here’s how it will work - There will be 14 QR codes displayed at various Exhibitor Booths with questions about the PATINS staff to answer.  Each will be a fun fact about a particular staff member and the Exhibitor will have the answer, so all it takes is a conversation to ask ‘em!   Write the answer on the back of the Expo name badge, drop in the Treasure Chest at the Door Prize Booth when complete and VOILA…one has met the challenge and has discovered some tidbits about each of us that might not have been known.  We are using http://www.classtools.net/ to generate our QR codes like this one  It’s free, easy to use and would be a great resource to try out with your students for a creative learning activity. 

If you are attending Tech Expo this year and participate in the QR Scavenger Hunt, I invite you to comment thru this blog on your experience.  I look forward to reading your thoughts. 

Game On!!  Boardgame
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