Curly Locks & The 2 Dimples

Curly Locks & The 2 Dimples
As a young girl, “Oh my goodness, look at those curls; and those dimples nearly swallow your cheeks!” were words that she would hear often from strangers.  One day, she even slipped and fell face flat into a mud puddle at a public park.  Clearly, the mud was what swallowed her face AND her embarrassed tears; but what she heard was, “Not even a speck of mud in those dimples,” from the lady who came to help her.  All she really wanted to hear was, “Are you ok?”...because she wasn’t.

Growing up, she quickly realized the smile that would create those dimples, was like a magic cape that would make her invisible...even when she wanted to be seen. Many acquaintances, friends and even teachers knew that behind the facade of a beautiful home, lived the girl who could not possibly be “ok”...but no one ever asked.

When she entered her high school years, a teacher realized a pattern in missing days at school...and the teacher asked, “Are you ok?”  The young girl froze in surprise of the question, looked at the teacher and smiled…”Yes, of course I’m ok.”  Her “magic cape” allowed her to vanish in plain sight once again with her grades slowly faltering.  Her barrier was the inability of verbal expression under intense stress, fear and/or anxiety.

While she was a typical student in the mainstream classroom who could speak and read and write text, this story makes me think of all of the students that come to classrooms daily from diverse backgrounds and needs...each one with their own form of a “magic cape.” With that in mind, working to create a universally designed environment (UDL) may seem like a daunting task when working with students with disabilities and/or emotional & behavior disorders. How are those students able to access what they know or how they feel if they are unable to access that communication in the way that they need? I would like to focus on one of the UDL principles- “multiple means of expression.”  


Behaviors happen for a reason and they can adversely affect a student’s educational performance.  Some students would rather have a physical or emotional outburst or shut down completely when asked to do a task in front of the classroom- before they will EVER let their peers know that they struggle with reading or completing what seems to be a simple math problem to most.  Some students may be repeatedly told in various ways that they are not smart; which in turn causes them to disengage academically and socially.  Not all students can express what they know or how they feel verbally.  What about our students who are nonverbal?  Not all students can express what they know or how they feel in written text.  What about our students with physical disabilities?  

At times, we get so caught up in what is in front of us, whether it is the disability, the behavior or even the dimples- that we avoid or forget to simply ask, “Are you ok?” A simple gesture that when asked, we must provide various ways for our students to respond in a way that best fits them.  A few examples are verbally, written, text-to-speech, drawing, recorded response, AAC, pictures, etc.  

Getting to the core of what is creating the behavior and addressing that with your student, can certainly assist in avoiding what I like to refer to as the behavioral domino effect.  Dominoes in lineMeaning, when one falls without being caught, it lands on another that falls, which lands on another, etc.  Before you know it, you have a whole line of new behaviors.  If you have ever lined up dominoes to create the chain reaction of falling in a pattern, then you know that if you want to set them back up...you have to set the very FIRST one back up that fell.

Let’s help our struggling students KNOW and FEEL that we care and that they CAN achieve great things.  Sometimes that IS the most important thing they need to know and understand.

For those of you who may want to know what happened to “Curly Locks & The 2 Dimples,” I do not want to close this blog with a story half written.  A teacher did ask her AND her entire class one day a simple question in the form of a writing prompt:  “Tell me something that you think I would never guess about you.”  The young lady wrote and she wrote and she kept writing...  

If you were to ask her if she is “ok” today...she will offer you a real smile, with no magic cape and now verbally respond,  “Absolutely.”  I can answer for her with complete confidence...

...because she, is me.
Drawing of girl in grass

 
 
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Comments 1

Guest - Jodi Click on Wednesday, 25 May 2016 13:36

Oh my gosh, so much this!!!!! Why doesn't everyone understand this and why isn't every single school trying to do this for students? No, scratch that. Why isn't every school MANDATING we do this for students?? Why is the intervention always the last part of the behavior cycle of failure, if it is ever even considered or provided, and not the very first thing we try so we can break the failure cycle? If every classroom were designed to meet the needs of the most needy, they would help every other student by default. Everyone could be successful. So often, it feels like schools don't actually WANT every student to be successful and some educators feel like there are meant to be failures in every classroom. If we are successful with all our students, we must have done something wrong, presented content that was too easy, not tested with enough rigor, something... We aren't supposed to be successful with EVERY student. Classrooms filled with success are never viewed as being a successful classroom - they are viewed with skepticism and even disdain. We have to change that mindset. Change the expectations. Every student can be successful. It's our job to find a way to make it happen without students jumping through hoops. The non-jumpers are the ones who need us most, but the jumpers who hate jumping or who find jumping painful would also be relieved at the absence of hoops. We often only notice the jumpers who jump through hoops exceptionally well, the non-jumpers, and the ones who take the hoops and throw them at our heads to get us to realize hoop-jumping isn't working for them. We lose the ones who continue to jump with gritted teeth, tripping and falling some of the time, but making it through enough hoops to move on to the next obstacle course filled with even more hoops, never truly mastering any level of hoops. If we just got rid of the hoops, everyone could get through on the first try and no one would trip and fall. That's how education should be.

Oh my gosh, so much this!!!!! Why doesn't everyone understand this and why isn't every single school trying to do this for students? No, scratch that. Why isn't every school MANDATING we do this for students?? Why is the intervention always the last part of the behavior cycle of failure, if it is ever even considered or provided, and not the very first thing we try so we can break the failure cycle? If every classroom were designed to meet the needs of the most needy, they would help every other student by default. Everyone could be successful. So often, it feels like schools don't actually WANT every student to be successful and some educators feel like there are meant to be failures in every classroom. If we are successful with all our students, we must have done something wrong, presented content that was too easy, not tested with enough rigor, something... We aren't supposed to be successful with EVERY student. Classrooms filled with success are never viewed as being a successful classroom - they are viewed with skepticism and even disdain. We have to change that mindset. Change the expectations. Every student can be successful. It's our job to find a way to make it happen without students jumping through hoops. The non-jumpers are the ones who need us most, but the jumpers who hate jumping or who find jumping painful would also be relieved at the absence of hoops. We often only notice the jumpers who jump through hoops exceptionally well, the non-jumpers, and the ones who take the hoops and throw them at our heads to get us to realize hoop-jumping isn't working for them. We lose the ones who continue to jump with gritted teeth, tripping and falling some of the time, but making it through enough hoops to move on to the next obstacle course filled with even more hoops, never truly mastering any level of hoops. If we just got rid of the hoops, everyone could get through on the first try and no one would trip and fall. That's how education should be.
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Tuesday, 23 January 2018

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