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Jul
21

Summer Birthdays and Celebrating Learning

via GIPHY

In the Sharritt family we have 70% of our birthdays in the span of 7 weeks in June through August. It’s both a joy and a challenge to buy gifts, get together to celebrate, and prepare birthday feasts and treats for 7/10 of my favorite folks on the planet. I have even celebrated my January birthday in July for the obvious reason that it won't be cancelled due to an ice storm. 

Gifts this year have ranged from a nose piercing for my daughter turning 16, power tool batteries for my son turning 33, and a train trip adventure for my granddaughter, turning 4. 

Requested (and surprise) treats this summer include:

  •  A Victoria Sponge served with local peaches for Grace who is both a fan of the British Bake Off and all the fruit
  • Brownie sundaes for Victoria turning 17 
  • Kouign Aman pastries for my daughter in law, Lisa (also BBO lover)
  • Chocolate Pie for Ben
  • Anything with sprinkles (Nevaeh and Maggie are kindred spirits on this one)
chocolate cake with sprinkles spelling out the number 16

To celebrate, we have had take-out barbeque on the porch, visits to Chicago, and one of the teenagers is going to have friends over for a giant hide-and-go-seek-in-the-dark at the farm this week. 

Each element of the celebrations connect with each individual and their personality and ongoing story. Even though these are my people, there is something new to be discovered in their identities each year.

We are a few weeks away from returning to school and if you are a teacher you will begin to discover the identities and stories of a new group of students. Edutopia  recently posted  an article and video about connecting identity to learning through language, STEM, and the arts. In the video I noticed the way that each student felt heard and respected, and thought about how each must feel celebrated as well. 



Project-Based Learning is also a great way to add Universal Design for Learning in your classroom. Our PATINS specialists can work with your district, school or department to train your team on these methods. 

Students thrive when they are known. Consider taking the time to work some celebrating into your lessons this fall. We’d love to help you plan the parties! 



 

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Jul
14

“Futura”

I recently found my high school yearbook online. It is almost 50 years old and yes, I am not a spring chicken. As you can imagine, it was interesting to take a walk down memory lane.

As I scrolled through the pages, our introduction to the yearbook caught my attention. What follows are a couple screen shots.

Once upon a time in old English font.

The text with emoji reads… there was a school called Gavit. In the school there were all kinds of students. One day a photographer came to the school and took pictures of all the students. …  and Every Picture Tells A Story.

This was followed by several photographs of high school life over the preceding year.

Even some 50 years ago there was text inserted with pictures. I can’t say this was the first time it was done. We didn’t predate cave inscriptions or hieroglyphics, but it was a different way of presenting information.

There are a variety of software programs, apps and picture dictionaries that are now available to help students and individuals grasp content.

Technology has taken it even further with the introduction of the Emoji, Bitmoji, Memoji, Animoji and just about any other Moji you can think if.

So, if this was my yearbook today, what might it look like?
The text with updated emoji reads… there was a   school called Gavit. In the school there were all kinds of students.  One day a photographer came to the school and took pictures of all the students. …  and Every Picture Tells A Story.

However, for me there’s nothing like the original.

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Jul
06

A Stained Glass Starfish

A Stained Glass Starfish Just show up and help make something beautiful. It will matter to at least one.

One of the most surprising things that happened to me last year was learning how to make stained glass art. By chance, I ran across a video of someone making a suncatcher and I immediately fell in love and bought a beginners kit.

It has been pretty easy to draw parallels between two of my favorite topics: stained glass art and accessibility, especially Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).

Learning only takes place when other people are involved.

Being self-taught is a myth. No one on this planet is “self-taught” because learning takes other people and the environments they design. While I have yet to attend a formal class in stained glass, I’ve benefitted from dozens of knowledgeable people. I’ve learned through the thoughtful design of hundreds of experienced teachers through the environment and tools they created for me. Our students are no different: the support we give and the environments we design are the soil, air, and water to their growing minds. No one learns in a vacuum.

I need a lot of tools.

So many tools! Six of them are for breaking glass in slightly different ways. But that makes sense because just like in AAC ecosystems we’re supporting an environment of creativity and communication and we need lots of tools to do it. We can’t teach someone one tool, even a really great tool, and expect it to work for all situations and times.

Good tools don’t make up for good technique.

Breaking glass is very easy, it’s breaking it the way you want it to break is the difficult part. It takes practice and learning and reflection. In the same vein, predictably I will get at least six phone calls this school year complaining that the communication tool they borrowed from the PATINS library didn’t work for a student, and when asked if they modeled on it and how often, the phone goes silent and we begin the conversation about how students do not learn by osmosis and a good tool doesn’t make up for evidence-based techniques. Every single item in our lending library we provide no-cost support and training so you can hone your skills and maximize your student’s success.

Everyone benefits if we design accessibly.

I choose many of my tools because they were designed for “people with arthritis” or “if you have cataracts.” I have neither, but my own disabilities and preferences, the specialized allow me to make things. Without them, I wouldn’t be able even to try! Providing multiple ways to communicate to and with learners also makes sense, even if they don’t “qualify” or aren’t someone you’d suspect would need that tool or technique.

Forget “go big or go home”: show up and do a little. 

I’ve spent most of my adult working life thinking everything had to be in 20-60 minute chunks to “count.” Even when I feel tired and uninterested, I try to spend 5 minutes in my “creative space” even if it’s just cleaning. 5 minutes is perfect to start. Modeling 5 phrases on a device are always better than 0. Spending 5 minutes connecting with a child is always better than none. Not every day can we or our students summit a mountain. Just show up and help make something beautiful. It will matter to at least one.

In honor of that "it matters to this one" mentality, I made a starfish and shared the process. I hope you enjoy it!




Video Description: Jessica Conrad narrates the starfish story while creating a starfish suncatcher. First, she pulls out sheets of blue glass of different colors and textures. Then with a red marker, she writes numbers on each part of a paper pattern of a starfish. Placing a blue-green stained glass sheet on top of the pattern she scores the glass with a glass cutter. Then using running pliers (decorated with googly eyes) she snaps the glass into pieces along the scored line several times breaking it into the desired shape. The pieces are taken to a glass grinder where the edges are smoothed. She then lines the edge of the cut glass with copper foil tape and uses a tiny roller to smooth out the foiled edges. She then lays out all five pieces of her stained-glass starfish onto the table and brushes the coper with flux. With a soldering iron, she applies the solder to the copper and a jump ring to the tip of one of the starfish legs. Finally, the finished star fish spins in the light by a window.

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