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Visions Newsletter

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Visions Newsletter

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IERC Staff

NamePositionPhone
Leslie Durst IERC Director800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Martha LaBounty IERC Librarian800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Betsy Scott IERC Braille Project Manager800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Robert Eutz Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Nonna Cortez Braille Transcriber800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Eric Kindler IERC Orders and Materials Specialist800-833-2198
317-554-2740

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Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline

Unified English Braille

Timeline for Implementation in Indiana

Compiled by Indiana UEB Implementation Committee

August 21, 2014; Revised April 13, 2015; November 16, 2015

Unified English Braille Code

In November 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while continuing the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html.

BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB). This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. For more information visit the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/pressreleases/pr-2013-11-26.html.

Indiana Statewide UEB Transition

Indiana has been actively working on the transition to UEB. A statewide stakeholders committee met in 2014 and 2015, and will continue to meet ongoing to further develop/refine Indiana’s state plan for UEB implementation and to guide the transition. The UEB Implementation Committee consists of representatives from the Statewide Resource Center, State AT Project, University Training Programs, Adult Services, Residential School and Outreach Staff, TBLV’s from around the state, Prison Braille Program, Braille Transcribers, and the Indiana Department of Education.

The Indiana UEB state plan was submitted to and approved by the Indiana Department of Education in September 2014. To date: transcribers have trained in the UEB and received their Canadian UEB certification. They are currently seeking U.S. national UEB certification; university programs have implemented UEB coursework for their teacher training programs; and workshops, conferences and webinars have and will be conducted for BLV teaching and paraprofessional staff.

Considerations for Math Code

UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

As a default, requests for instructional materials for subjects that require math code (i.e., science and mathematics), for all grades, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for mathematics.  UEB will be provided in lieu of Nemeth Code only if the student’s IEP dictates UEB for math instruction.  The Case Conference Committee (CCC) must determine if UEB or UEB with Nemeth better meets the instructional needs of the student.

When it is determined that braille is a consideration for the student who is blind, then the code for the instruction of math/technical subjects (Nemeth or UEB) will need to be specified and a written justification provided.

To view “Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code” developed by the UEB Implementation Sub-Committee, click here

Timeline

The transition to UEB from EBAE in Indiana will be a six year plan, based on a school year calendar.  It began with the 2013-2014 SY and will run through the 2018-2019 SY.  Full implementation of the UEB (i.e. instruction, materials, assessment) is targeted for the 2018-2019 SY.

Each local education agency (LEA), based on the approved state timeline, will be responsible for developing a plan for implementation of the UEB at the local level to meet the full implementation UEB date. The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) will work closely with LEA’s to best meet the educational braille needs of individual students.

Implementation of this timeline involves the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available.

Timeline Breakdown

2013-2014 SY

  • Transcriber training.

  • Research and begin drafting state plan.

     

2014-2015 SY

  • Transcriber training and certification.

  • Approval of a state plan for UEB implementation.

  • Statewide UEB professional development for BLV teacher and paraprofessional staff (workshops, conferences, braille training, webinars and UEB resources).

  • January 2015

    • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2015-2016 school year, for Grades K-5.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2015

IDOE provides state assessments in EBAE/Nemeth.

2015-2016 SY

  • September 2015

Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in Grades K-5.  Begin using available UEB materials.

  • January 2016

    • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2016-2017 school year, for all grades.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2016

      IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth as well as EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 3-5 and EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 6 and up.

2016-2017 SY

  • September 2016

Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in grades 6 and up. Begin using available UEB materials.

  • January 2017

    • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2017

      IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

2017-2018 SY

  • September 2017

    Continue UEB instruction as needed for remaining students, move in and transfer students.

  • January 2018

    • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2018

IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

2018-2019

  • Complete UEB transition. All school-age materials will be produced in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth.  All students who read braille will be expected to access material produced in UEB.

  • Based on availability of UEB, existing materials transcribed in EBAE may continue to be provided.

    • Spring 2019

IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

UEB Trainings and Learning Opportunities

Training will be provided by the PASS (Promoting Achievement for Students with Sensory Loss) Project, Blumberg Center, Indiana State University in collaboration with the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) and the PATINS (Promoting Achievement Through Technology and Instruction for all Student) Project, through 2015. Additional trainings after 2015 will be provided as needed.

  • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille (Fall 2014)

UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille was intended to educate and prepare teachers and staff in order to facilitate a smooth transition from EBAE to UEB.  Six regional trainings provided a comparison of English Braille American Edition (EBAE) and UEB.  Teachers and staff participated in hands-on exercises specific to UEB.

  • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille Webinar (Fall 2014)

A webinar was developed as a resource and for those unable to attend the regional trainings.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:http://dgmpresentations.pbworks.com/w/page/90921945/UEB%20Intro%20Videos

  • UEB Ready? ListServ (Fall 2014)

An e-mail discussion listserv has been created to provide a communication tool for teachers and staff to ask questions, share resources and strategies, and discuss important issues specific to the implementation of Unified English Braille (UEB).  Transcribers, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals working with students who utilize braille as their literacy mode are participating in this forum.

  • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Directors of Special Education (Fall 2014)

A webinar was developed to address questions and concerns specific to Directors of Special Education in Indiana regarding the transition to UEB.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:

https://tegr.it/y/1hqfn

  • UEB Ready?  A Supported Independent Study (Spring 2015 & Summer 2015)

The PASS Project in conjunction with Indiana State University offered a 13-week training program via distance education utilizing Blackboard.  Participants in the program are using Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille (API-UEB) as a guide to learning UEB.  Throughout the program, instructors answered questions and provided feedback on quizzes prior to the final exam.

  • UEB Ready? Teaching the Technology (Spring 2015)

This training provided an opportunity for vendors to share information about technology that supports Unified English Braille (UEB).  Participants were presented with the capabilities of various devices and how to utilize these devices with students thereby allowing teachers to make informed recommendations on the device(s) that will best meet the needs of students. This training was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.  Students and their parents are encouraged to attend.

  • UEB Ready? Teaching the Software (Spring 2015)

In this training, participants learned how to utilize the Duxbury Braille Translation software to become more efficient in their ability to transcribe and produce needed braille instructional materials in UEB.  It was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.

  • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Parents (Fall 2015)

A webinar was developed with parents in mind directly addressing their questions or concerns regarding the transition to UEB. To access the webinar, follow the link below: http://bit.ly/uebparentwebinar

  • UEB Ready? Teaching the Transition (Fall 2015)

This training provided strategies and resources to assist Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision when teaching the transition from EBAE to UEB.

Resources

The IERC website will post UEB information, resources, and updates. UEB information can be found at the IERC website or by visiting the BANA website:


UEB Implementation Committee Members

Leslie Durst, Facilitator - Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center 

Katie Crawford - BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools 

Rhoda Davis - Braille Instructor, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Jim Durst - Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired 

Robert Eutz - Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP), Miami Correctional Facility

Martha LaBounty - Database Librarian, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Jeanne Lee - BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

Matt Maurer – Professor, Butler University 

Bill Powell - BOSMA Enterprises

Daniel McNulty - Director, PATINS Project

Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Carol Wetherell - Director, Indiana State University, Blumberg Center

Kristan Sievers-Coffer - Special Education Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

Karen Stein - Special Programs Assessment Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

Marcee Wilburn - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

Jay Wilson - Principal, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

UEB Implementation Sub-Committee Members

Marcee Wilburn, Facilitator - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

Lynda Blaising – BLV Consultant, Northeast Indiana Special Education Cooperative

Katie Crawford – BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools

Jim Durst –Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Leslie Durst – Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Nanette Galloway – BLV Consultant, Elkhart County Special Education Cooperative

Alessandra Kester – BLV HS Life Skills Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Jeanne Lee – BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

Shelby Metzler – BLV Consultant, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

Rhonda Rhoades – BLV Consultant, North Central Indiana Special Education Cooperative

Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Lisa Starrfield – BLV Mathematics Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

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App List

AbleRoad iOS App is a free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairments. Requires iOS 5.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

Access Together, is an app designed to help people with disabilities locate accessible restaurants, shops and other venues in their communities. For more information, visit: http://www.accesstogether.org/.

AccessNote, an iOS notetaking app for the classroom from the American Foundation for the Blind, is available from the iTunes App store. Cost: $19.99. The app requires iOS 7.1 or later and is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information visit iTunes

Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.


Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built-in screen reader. Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download)
which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at 
https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.


Better Vision All-in-One Reading App is a mobile app for iOS and Android devices that magnifies text, provides contrast and color filters to improve clarity, and can read text aloud. The Zoom-in Magnification enlarges text and images from 2x to 10x; the reading lamp works on mobile devices that have a built-in light function; the text-to-speech reads text aloud in four languages (English, German, Dutch, and Spanish); and the Contrast Enhancing Filters allow the choice of six color scheme settings, including high contrast white on black. Cost: $5.99 from the app store or on Play Google. For more information, click here.

Braille Driller- An app for people who want learn the Braille alphabet.  Includes a review of the Braille alphabet and four activities of increasing difficulty. For use on the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

Braille Now - An app designed to teach sighted persons how to recognize the Braille letters a-z. For use on iPad. $0.99 from iTunes.

Braille Sonar - This app allows for the lookup of Contracted Braille symbols, somb basic computer braille symbols and Nemeth Code.  Free from iTunes.  Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Color ID Free - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.  For use on iPad, iPod Touch(fourth generation and newer), iPad 2 and Android. Free from iTunes.

Color Identifier - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.$4.99 from iTunes.

Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

Disney Movies Anywhere App - Every Pixar film is now available with Mobile Audio Description from Disney using the Disney Movies Anywhere app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/disney-movies-anywhere-watch/id766894692?mt=8

DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

Dragon Dictation - Dictate message and Dragon types it out on the screen.  Options include text message, email, copy-and-past, Facebook, and Twitter.  Works on iPad, iPhone, and on second and third generation iPod Touch (external microphone required).  Free from iTunes

eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.

Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

EyeHope Magnifier - Turns iPhone into a powerful magnifier (1-100x magnification). Four high-contrast modes for low vision users. For use with iPhone or iPod Touch. $.99 from iTunes.

Fleksy - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

Learning Ally Audio - Learning Ally members to download DAISY audio Learning Ally titles from onto iOS devices, i.e. iPad, iPhone and iPod. Membership is required.  The app is free from iTunes.

Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

LookTel Money Reader - Identifies type of bills using the iPhone or iPod Touch.  $9.99 from iTunes.

LookTel VoiceOver Tutorial App - Learn and Practice the Basic Gestures used with VoiceOver and iOS.  For more information visit Applevis.  App is free from iTunes.  

MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.  http://mpaja.com/frontpage/MBraille

Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.


Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

Talking Timer- Designed as an aid in exercise—found useful in kitchen.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $0.99 from iTunes.

Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

ThirdEye Technologies Inc. - ThirdEye restores autonomy to visually impaired persons' lives by enabling them to recognize everyday objects.  Users touch on button and the technology verbally returns back whatever object the user is looking at within seconds (for example a "5 US Dollar Bill" or an "Ibuprofen bottle").  App is free from iTunes.

ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  


Timely-Time Teller iOS app will announce the time at regular intervals and at specific recurring times. Timely-Time Teller requires iOS 6.0 or later, is compatible with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.  It is available for $2.99 from the iTunes App Store

VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

ViA - Visually Impaired Apps. A Free app from Braille Institute of America for the iPhone or iPad to assist blind and low-vision users to easily sort through the 500,000+ apps in the iTunes App Store to locate the apps that were built specifically for visually impaired users.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  Free from iTunes.

VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

Voice Brief - Reads emails, twitter, etc aloud.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $2.99 from iTunes.

Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes App Store for $9.99.

Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.

ZoomReader - Optical Character Recognition allows user text-to-speech on books or menus.  $19.99 on iTunes.

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IERC Indiana UEB Position Statement

UEB Transition and Implementation in Indiana

Indiana Educational Resource Center/ICAM
Position Statement for the Provision of Materials

The Braille Authority of North America (BANA) is the official governing body for braille in the United States. In November 2012, BANA voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while maintaining the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The UEB will replace the English Braille American Edition (EBAE). The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html. BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB).

UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

Textbooks and other instructional materials for students who are blind or have low vision will be provided by the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) via the Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM), per the approved UEB Timeline for Implementation in Indiana, and as indicated below:

•Requests for instructional materials in subjects using literary braille (i.e., social studies and language arts), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2015-16 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades, in subjects using literary braille, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2016-2017 school year.

•Requests for instructional materials in subjects that require math (i.e., science and mathematics), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth for the 2015-2016 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades in technical subjects, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for the 2016-2017 school year. UEB Technical Code will be provided in lieu of UEB with Nemeth Code if the student’s IEP dictates UEB math. BANA’s “Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts” will be followed for UEB with Nemeth Code transcription.

•Instructional materials previously transcribed in EBAE will continue to be made available. The IERC will not convert and produce existing braille files from EBAE into UEB as a policy. The transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC. Students who have been taught EBAE may continue to receive materials originally produced in the EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students, just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

•The provision of textbooks and instructional materials in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code will be dependent on the availability and capacity of certified transcribers.

The IERC is committed to providing access to instructional materials in braille for students who are blind or have low vision, per their IEP, and will continue to work together with schools towards a smooth transition to the UEB.

Transition will be a gradual process over the next few of years. Implementation will involve the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available. Indiana is anticipating full implementation for the 2018-2019 school year.

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IERC Practice

AbleRoad iOS App is a  free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairements.  The app is designed for both iPhone and iPad. For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

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IERC Annual Calendar

First Monday in January
  • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind begins on the first Monday in January. 
February 15
  • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind is completed on the ICAM by IERC appointed Designees.
  • Process for submitting braille orders on the ICAM to the IERC for the next school year begins.
March 15
  • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration Report is submitted to the American Printing House for the Blind by the IERC.
  • Annual IERC Inventory Recall/Reallocation process begins on the ICAM.
May 1
  • Material requests for the next school year are due to be submitted on the ICAM.
May 15
  • Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation process ends.
June 15
  • Materials currently on loan, that have not been renewed or retained during the Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation, are due back at the IERC.
July 15
  • IERC begins shipping materials ordered on the ICAM to the schools. 
October 1
  • Federal Quota allocation is appropriated to the American Printing House for the Blind. The allocation is made available to the IERC/Indiana Department of Education.
December 15
  • School Corporations begin to prepare for the Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind.

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Unified English Braille Code (UEB)

On November 2, 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) passed the motion to officially adopt the Unified English Braille code or UEB in the United States. In November 2013, BANA affirmed January 4, 2016 as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of the UEB. This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. The forum involved 48 delegates representing 31 organizations from the braille community. Read more here.

The IERC has been preparing for the rollout of UEB since 2012. Our braille transcribers have trained and received certification in the new code and have actively been transcribing instructional materials in UEB. The IERC has worked closely with the Indiana State University Blumberg Center, PASS Project, to develop and conduct training for teachers and paraprofessionals who will be responsible for instructing our braille readers in the new code. Student instruction has begun for all grades and the IERC is transcribing all new requests in UEB and UEB/Nemeth.

Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline Webpage     PDF
Indiana UEB Position Statement Webpage     PDF
Indiana Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code PDF
UEB and Nemeth Code Power Point  PDF 

Considerations for States Providing Materials in Braille, NCEO Webpage



If you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact Leslie Durst at 317-554-2740 or 800-833-2198: email: Leslie Durst For information on trainings, contact Robin Thoma at Robin.Thoma@indstate.edu 

To read more about the UEB, please visit BANA or International Council on English Braille.

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News for Parents of Children Who are Blind or Have Low Vision

Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network 

Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network provides resources to connect with other parents, including a monthly parent newsletter with helpful tips and resources, as well as tele-support groups and presentations. Visit the Lighthouse Guild website to learn more.

VO Lab


VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

Ballyland Magic App


Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built in screen reader.  Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

Storybud

Storybud is an online story site, developed by a father with low vision so that he could interact with his children during bedtime story time. Storybud provides the online stories in various formats: audio only; a combined text and audio; or text on the screen only. The site is accessible for persons who are visually impaired using speech software. Visit www.storybud.org for more information.

Center for Parent Information and Resources

The Center for Parent Information and Resources has an updated fact sheet on children with visual impairment, including blindness. Visit http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/specific-disabilities/ to read more. 

Learning Ally’s Website Adds Features for Parents


Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization serving 300,000 children and adults across the U.S. who have visual, learning and reading-based disabilities, has transformed its website and launched new features and services to further benefit its members as well as parents and teachers. Parents can check out the more stremlined and user-friendly web site to access the organization's on-line library of more than 75,000 human-narrated audiobooks, including the world's largest library of audio textbooks. 

VOICEtext, providing sentence-by-sentence highlighting of text on the screen in sync with audio narration. In its initial stages, this feature is being incorporated into a limited selection of titles in Learning Ally's library, will expand into more titles over time, and will benefit individuals for whom a multi-sensory approach to reading is recommended.

Perkins Resources

scout logo transThe Perkins School for the Blind have resources for parent, kids, and teacher that include fiction and non-fiction books and Internet resources. Read more at http://www.perkins.org/history/visit/research-library. Additional teacher resources are located at http://www.perkins.org/elearning.

Perkins Scout is a searchable database of carefully evaluated online resources related to blindness and visual impairment. The website mascot, a·dog guide·named Scout, will help you retrieve the information you’re looking for; all of it has been reviewed by Perkins experts and organized for your convenience.·More information is available at http://www.perkinselearning.org/scout.

Free Braille Books

Seedlings Logo 7 11 newcolorsThrough the Seedlings Book Angel Program, visually-impaired children can receive two free braille books. Choose from print/braille/picture books, print/braille books, or braille only books. Register online at www.seedlings.org.


Expanded Core Curriculum Resource

The American Foundation for the Blind and the Perkins School for the Blind provide, a grassroots forum and a central resource and gateway to more information about the Expanded Core Curriculum

WonderBaby


WonderBaby.orgwb birds on text small, a project funded by Perkins School for the Blind, is dedicated to helping parents of young children with vision impairments as well as children with multiple disabilities. Much of the content on WonderBaby is provided by parents. They are not just passive observers or consumers of information; many site users comment on articles, answer questions in the Q&A forum, and share hyperlinks to net resources. Some submit original articles. It's in this sharing that WonderBaby earns much of its authenticity. These are real parents with real kids who are blind or visually disabled. They can empathize with other parents seeking answers. Having educated themselves, they feel compelled to give back so that fellow and future parents of children who are blind or visually disabled can also benefit from their experiences.

Youth Transition Toolkit now available online from Talent Knows No Limits

The "Youth Transition Toolkit: A Guide for Young People with Disabilities Transitioning to Adulthood" is now available online from Talent Knows No Limits (TKNL), a public information campaign of the California Health Incentives Improvement Project (CHIIP). Developed in partnership with young people, the toolkit is designed as a how-to guide on preparing for transition to adulthood and making choices about their own health care, education, employment, finances, independent living, and social and recreational activities. Some of the questions the toolkit helps youth address include:
  • What is Transition Planning? What is an IEP and how can I lead my IEP Meeting?
  • How can I manage my Social Security and medical benefits?
  • How does college differ from high school? How can I obtain services for my disability during college?
  • What resources are available to help me choose the right career?
  • Is there assistive technology available that can help me secure a job?
  • How can I find accessible housing to live on my own?
  • What should I do to prepare for a job interview?
While some of the services and resources provided are California state-specific, much of the guidance is applicable to youth in any state. The toolkit was developed with funding from a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

To learn more, visit the Youth Transition Toolkit website.

Family Connect

Do you want to connect with other parents of a blind or visually impaired child? Check out the American Foundation for the Blind’s “Family Connect” web site at http://www.familyconnect.org/parentsitehome.aspx. Information on numerous subjects of interest to parents, such as IEP’s, toys, eye care, etc. can also be found on this site.


Braille Tales Free Print-Braille Children’s Book Program

The American Printing House for the Blind is seeking applicants for its free print-braille children’s book program, Braille Tales. Braille Tales collaborates with the Dolly Parton Imagination Library and the Kentucky Correctional Institute to mail 6 print-braille books a year to families with a child and/or a parent with a visual impairment.

Braille Tales is designed specifically for blind preschool children (age 0-5) and their families to foster early literacy and familiarity with braille. The program brings accessible, age-appropriate books into the homes of children who might not otherwise experience braille until they begin school.



National Braille Press, Programs Promoting Braille Literacy

pressHands On! Books for Blind Children is a series of programs for blind children that seek to provide braille books to thousands of blind children and their families throughout every stage of their learning and to provide advocacy and education promoting the benefits of braille. These programs include: Readbooks! Because Braille Matters Family Outreach Program, Bumpy Basics, Children's Braille Book Club, and Lifelong Literacy. Visit the NBP web page for more information about these children’s programs at http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/programs/index.html.

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International Standard Book Numbers (ISBN)

What Are They...and, Why Are They So Important?
Since 2007, the ISBN has been a 13-digit number that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally. Previously, the ISBN was a ten-digit number.

What is the purpose of an ISBN?
The purpose of the ISBN is to establish and identify one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition, allowing for more efficient marketing of products by booksellers, libraries, universities, wholesalers and distributors.

What are the unique characteristics of an ISBN?
Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN. Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused. An ISBN is printed on the lower portion of the back cover of a book above the bar code and on the copyright page.

Examples of formats which require a unique ISBN include:
  • Hardcover versions of textbooks
  • Paperbound versions of textbooks
  • Indiana Editions of textbooks
  • National Editions of textbooks
  • Teachers Editions of textbooks
  • Examination copies of textbooks (often shared with districts during district new adoption process)
  • Revised editions of textbooks
  • E-book format of textbooks that are purchased from publisher
  • Etc.
Some ISBN's end in an "X," in which case enter the "X" into the search string

Does the ISBN-13 have any meaning imbedded in the numbers?
The five parts of an ISBN are as follows:
  1. The current ISBN-13 will be prefixed by "978"...usually
  2. Group or country identifier which identifies a national or geographic grouping of publishers
  3. Publisher identifier which identifies a particular publisher within a group
  4. Title identifier which identifies a particular title or edition of a title
  5. Check digit is the single digit at the end of the ISBN which validates the ISBN
Tricks and Tips to Identifying the Correct ISBN!

When searching for an ISBN, school-based staff often give the Digital Rights Manager (DRM) the ISBN of the teacher edition or an examination copy.· Both of these editions have a different ISBN number than the student textbook edition ISBN. The IERC requires the student edition ISBN number as all of books we transcribe, produce and provide are student editions.

The following are TIPS to identifying the correct ISBN:
  • Ask the school-based staff to make a copy of the back cover of the Student Edition of the textbook or a copy of the copyright page.
  • Google the ISBN (the actual number, itself, without the hyphens).· You can also enter the number at www.gettextbooks.com to verify the correct edition and textbook information.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Do NOT enter the hyphens of the ISBN when searching any database.

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The IERC Braille Project


The mission of the Braille Project is to provide high quality, well formatted braille instructional materials in a timely manner to Indiana’s school-age students who are blind or have low vision and whose assessed, primary reading medium is braille.

Orders for braille instructional materials are submitted thru the ICAM. The IERC assigns transcripts to the Braille Project for instructional materials, currently not available in braille, as their capacity allows.


The Braille Project utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcribers.

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The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)


The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) was established in May of 2008 thru the collaborative efforts of the Indiana Department of Corrections, the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired/Indiana Educational Resource Center and the Indiana Department of Education. It is the goal of the project to provide quality braille, large print, and accessible instructional materials to students who are blind or have low vision in Indiana’s local schools, in a timely and efficient manner, while providing a skill to the offenders that will increase employment opportunities thus reducing recidivism.

MAMP produces and transcribe books from National Instructional Material Accessible Standard (NIMAS) formatted publisher files whenever possible. NIMAS files are electronic publisher files that have been formatted or tagged in a universal format to assist accessible format textbook producers in producing accessible specialized formats in a timely manner. By utilizing NIMAS files, textbooks no longer need to be scanned in or input manually. This significantly speeds up the process of producing braille, large print and digitally rendered textbooks. However, the ICAM can only access NIMAS files from the national repository, the National Instructional Materials Center (NIMAC), if the schools require the publishers per their textbook contracts to send them down to the NIMAC. Be sure to include this contractual language when purchasing textbooks from the publisher to insure that the appropriate files can be secured for production and transcription, especially for core instructional materials not on the state adoption lists. See an example of this contractual language.

Print copies of the textbooks are still required for production and transcription, along with the NIMAS file, to insure that all text, images, and image descriptions are included and placed in the correct sequence.

MAMP utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcription.


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IERC Federal Quota Annual Census/Registration of Legally Blind Students

The IERC administers the Federal Quota dollars for the State of Indiana through the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) and registers all eligible legally blind students, public and private, with APH.

Each year during the month of January, Authorized Officials or their Designees are asked to participate in the "Annual Census of Students Who Are Legally Blind". The purpose of the registration is to enroll eligible students who meet the legal definition of blindness to generate Federal Quota dollars.

In order for the State of Indiana to participate in the Federal "Act to Promote the Education of the Blind", the registration status of all students who are legally blind is reviewed annually. The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) administers the federal quota allocation for all states, including Indiana. Funds are appropriated by Congress to APH for the production of specialized instructional materials to be used by students who are legally blind. The appropriated amount is then divided into separate accounts within each state according to the number of students who are legally blind reported in an annual registration. Students must be legally blind, enrolled in educational programs below the college level and have a parental consent form, in English  or  Spanish , on file in order to be eligible for inclusion on the list sent by the IERC to APH. For additional information regarding the parental consent process, read our consent to release student information talking points as well a short FAQ document.

Schools or agencies may order items available from APH federal quota allocation equal to the funds generated by the number of students who are legally blind registered by them each year. So long as funds are available within a given year, the IERC will honor any reasonable and legitimate request for APH material that is approved by the designated contact person. Items ordered with APH federal quota funds must originally be used by students who are legally blind and generated the dollars. Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.

For more information regarding the federal quota, visit: APH Federal Quota Overview

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Frequently Asked Questions

When should braille and large print instructional materials be ordered?

All textbook orders for the upcoming school year should be ordered by April 15 of the current school year if possible.  Order all textbooks titles you know that the student will require.  It takes a minimum of 4 months for new braille transcriptions and 3 months for production of large print/accessible files, sometimes longer during the summer peak order season.

Is there a cost to borrow materials from the IERC?

LEA's do not have to pay for the materials received from the IERC.  Materials are provided through Federal Quota dollars and Part B discretionary funds and are on loan to the LEA's.  All items are tracked and LEA's are accountable for the return of materials to the IERC when the student has finished using them. 

Why do you need the ISBN number on textbook orders?

The ISBN or International Standard Book Number is a unique 13-digit number that identifies one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition.  Prior to 2007, it was a ten-digit number.  Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN.  Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused.  This number helps the IERC pin-point the exact textbook information.  Read more about ISBN numbers here.

Sometimes classroom teachers provide the wrong textbook information to me and I order the wrong large print or braille book. If the IERC provides the book I have ordered, but it is the wrong title or edition, will they provide a second, corrected copy?

Only if we have it in our collection, ready to loan.  We will not purchase a second copy as these items are very costly.  It is the responsibility of the LEA to insure the accuracy of the order information prior to placing the order the first time.  The IERC will provide the LEA with commercial sources where they can purchase the materials directly if needed.

Does the IERC supply magnifiers, CCTV's or other non-APH materials?

No.  The LEA's will need to purchase these materials directly from the commercial vendors.  The LEA's may want to contact the PATINS Project Lending Library for product information or possible equipment loan. http://www.patinsproject.org/

May DRM's order more that one copy of a braille or large print textbook for a student?

The IERC will provide one set of textbooks in braille or large print.  It is the LEA's responsibility to provide a second copy if it has been documented as a need on the student's individualized education plan.  The IERC's role is to assist the LEA's in the provision of accessible instructional materials.

Are the materials ordered with federal quota dollars generated by my students the property of the school or do the materials need to be returned to the IERC?

Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.  It is the responsibility of the state's Ex Officio (IERC Director) to oversee the federal account, which includes the distribution, tracking, and re-loan of educational materials purchased with quota dollars.  All federal quota dollars as well as materials purchased with those dollars must be accounted for.

May the student consume braille and large print workbooks?

Workbooks or consumable textbooks ONLY may be consumed if needed.  If materials are consumed, they must be accounted for during the annual inventory recall process as consumed so we can update our inventory accordingly.

If my student moves in-state, but to another LEA, can I send his/her materials with them or do they need to be returned to the IERC?

All materials loaned to an LEA for use by a specific student must be returned to the IERC if the student moves to a different school corporation.  It will be the responsibility of the DRM from the new school corporation to update the student information on the ICAM and to order materials required for use by the student enrolled in the new LEA. 

If borrowed braille and large print textbooks and specialized aids and equipment are not accounted for or returned to the IERC at the end of each school year, will the ordering district be charged for their replacement?

The local education agency is ultimately responsible for tracking and accounting for all ordered instructional materials purchased with state and federal dollars and loaned to them by the IERC at the end of each school year.  The IERC reserves the right to charge the ordering local education agency for lost or unaccounted braille and large print books as well as specialized aids and equipment.  For books with multiple volumes, the school district would be charged for the cost to replace the entire book, if the IERC cannot replace individual volumes.

Why do I need to send two print copies of a textbook for production of transcription?

If textbooks ordered are not available in large print or braille, two original copies will be requested by the IERC for production or transcription from the LEA.  One copy is torn apart during the production process and kept on site with the master and the second copy, used for proofreading, is returned to the school after production or transcription is complete.  It is the responsibility of the local education agency to provide the requested print copies of the textbooks, not the IERC or the MAMP.  The local education agency can choose not to send print copies to the IERC for production or transcription and can purchase directly from commercial sources if available. 

Why did the IERC send out a braille copy of the national edition of a book when the state edition was ordered?

In order to keep costs down and to prevent the transcription of a braille book already available, the IERC reserves the right to substitute the national edition of an ordered state edition if the publisher verifies that the national edition is classroom compatible with the state edition. 

Will the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) produce accessible versions of any textbook?

No.  Only accessible derivative versions, as a result of the production of the hard copy large print or transcription of a braille textbook, will be made available in accessible formats as determined appropriate by the MAMP.  Any accessible formats produced by the MAMP will appear in the ICAM during a search if the student has qualified for these specialized formats per their IEP.

May large print and braille instructional materials be ordered directly from the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)?

No.  All orders for large print and braille instructional materials must go through the ICAM via the appointed DRM and then to the IERC for review and processing. All orders sent to MAMP originate from the IERC.

Will the IERC enlarge or transcribe ISTEP preparatory materials?

The Indiana Educational Resource Center is unable to provide braille or large print copies of ISTEP preparatory materials.  The IERC has been instructed by the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) assessment office that we cannot produce ISTEP materials (even if it is part of a publisher bundle) into an alternate format because these materials are not endorsed by the IDOE. Therefore, because they are not endorsed by the state, we cannot expend our federal Part B dollars to produce alternate formats for our students.  In addition, the material contained in these items, per IDOE, may actually violate the Indiana State Board of Education's Ethical Testing Practices and Procedures.  School corporations are encouraged to use the endorsed ISTEP materials and assessment.

Will the IERC provide textbooks of a religious nature for a students being served in parentally placed, non-public schools?

No.  Per the Indiana State Code, we cannot expend federal dollars on the purchase or production of religious curriculum materials for use by students in parentally-placed, non-public schools, including those books from religious publishers. However, if the book is used as part of the local education agency curriculum and has been endorsed by the local education agency, we can provide those titles.

Does the IERC provide older copyrights or editions of braille and large print textbooks?

The IERC reserves the right, dependent on funding, to not purchase older copyrights or editions of specialized braille and large print instructional materials.  If the LEA requests an older copyright of a textbook in braille or large print, and the IERC is unable to purchase, the IERC will assist the LEA by researching available commercial vendors for procurement at the local level.  Furthermore, if an LEA writes into a student's individualized education program (IEP) that braille and/or large print textbooks will be provided for a student, it shall not be the ultimate responsibility of the IERC to provide the braille and/or large print textbooks and materials.

Will the IERC replace braille and large print instructional materials lost by districts?

Due to limited funds, the IERC cannot replace specialized instructional materials that have been purchased/shipped by the IERC and received at the LEA, then lost or misplaced at the local level.

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IERC Staff

NamePositionPhone
Leslie Durst IERC Director800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Martha LaBounty IERC Librarian800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Betsy Scott IERC Braille Project Manager800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Robert Eutz Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Nonna Cortez Braille Transcriber800-833-2198
317-554-2740
Eric Kindler IERC Orders and Materials Specialist800-833-2198
317-554-2740

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Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline

Unified English Braille

Timeline for Implementation in Indiana

Compiled by Indiana UEB Implementation Committee

August 21, 2014; Revised April 13, 2015; November 16, 2015

Unified English Braille Code

In November 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while continuing the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html.

BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB). This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. For more information visit the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/pressreleases/pr-2013-11-26.html.

Indiana Statewide UEB Transition

Indiana has been actively working on the transition to UEB. A statewide stakeholders committee met in 2014 and 2015, and will continue to meet ongoing to further develop/refine Indiana’s state plan for UEB implementation and to guide the transition. The UEB Implementation Committee consists of representatives from the Statewide Resource Center, State AT Project, University Training Programs, Adult Services, Residential School and Outreach Staff, TBLV’s from around the state, Prison Braille Program, Braille Transcribers, and the Indiana Department of Education.

The Indiana UEB state plan was submitted to and approved by the Indiana Department of Education in September 2014. To date: transcribers have trained in the UEB and received their Canadian UEB certification. They are currently seeking U.S. national UEB certification; university programs have implemented UEB coursework for their teacher training programs; and workshops, conferences and webinars have and will be conducted for BLV teaching and paraprofessional staff.

Considerations for Math Code

UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

As a default, requests for instructional materials for subjects that require math code (i.e., science and mathematics), for all grades, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for mathematics.  UEB will be provided in lieu of Nemeth Code only if the student’s IEP dictates UEB for math instruction.  The Case Conference Committee (CCC) must determine if UEB or UEB with Nemeth better meets the instructional needs of the student.

When it is determined that braille is a consideration for the student who is blind, then the code for the instruction of math/technical subjects (Nemeth or UEB) will need to be specified and a written justification provided.

To view “Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code” developed by the UEB Implementation Sub-Committee, click here

Timeline

The transition to UEB from EBAE in Indiana will be a six year plan, based on a school year calendar.  It began with the 2013-2014 SY and will run through the 2018-2019 SY.  Full implementation of the UEB (i.e. instruction, materials, assessment) is targeted for the 2018-2019 SY.

Each local education agency (LEA), based on the approved state timeline, will be responsible for developing a plan for implementation of the UEB at the local level to meet the full implementation UEB date. The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) will work closely with LEA’s to best meet the educational braille needs of individual students.

Implementation of this timeline involves the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available.

Timeline Breakdown

2013-2014 SY

  • Transcriber training.

  • Research and begin drafting state plan.

     

2014-2015 SY

  • Transcriber training and certification.

  • Approval of a state plan for UEB implementation.

  • Statewide UEB professional development for BLV teacher and paraprofessional staff (workshops, conferences, braille training, webinars and UEB resources).

  • January 2015

    • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2015-2016 school year, for Grades K-5.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2015

IDOE provides state assessments in EBAE/Nemeth.

2015-2016 SY

  • September 2015

Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in Grades K-5.  Begin using available UEB materials.

  • January 2016

    • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2016-2017 school year, for all grades.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2016

      IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth as well as EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 3-5 and EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 6 and up.

2016-2017 SY

  • September 2016

Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in grades 6 and up. Begin using available UEB materials.

  • January 2017

    • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2017

      IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

2017-2018 SY

  • September 2017

    Continue UEB instruction as needed for remaining students, move in and transfer students.

  • January 2018

    • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

    • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

    • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

    • Spring 2018

IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

2018-2019

  • Complete UEB transition. All school-age materials will be produced in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth.  All students who read braille will be expected to access material produced in UEB.

  • Based on availability of UEB, existing materials transcribed in EBAE may continue to be provided.

    • Spring 2019

IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

UEB Trainings and Learning Opportunities

Training will be provided by the PASS (Promoting Achievement for Students with Sensory Loss) Project, Blumberg Center, Indiana State University in collaboration with the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) and the PATINS (Promoting Achievement Through Technology and Instruction for all Student) Project, through 2015. Additional trainings after 2015 will be provided as needed.

  • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille (Fall 2014)

UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille was intended to educate and prepare teachers and staff in order to facilitate a smooth transition from EBAE to UEB.  Six regional trainings provided a comparison of English Braille American Edition (EBAE) and UEB.  Teachers and staff participated in hands-on exercises specific to UEB.

  • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille Webinar (Fall 2014)

A webinar was developed as a resource and for those unable to attend the regional trainings.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:http://dgmpresentations.pbworks.com/w/page/90921945/UEB%20Intro%20Videos

  • UEB Ready? ListServ (Fall 2014)

An e-mail discussion listserv has been created to provide a communication tool for teachers and staff to ask questions, share resources and strategies, and discuss important issues specific to the implementation of Unified English Braille (UEB).  Transcribers, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals working with students who utilize braille as their literacy mode are participating in this forum.

  • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Directors of Special Education (Fall 2014)

A webinar was developed to address questions and concerns specific to Directors of Special Education in Indiana regarding the transition to UEB.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:

https://tegr.it/y/1hqfn

  • UEB Ready?  A Supported Independent Study (Spring 2015 & Summer 2015)

The PASS Project in conjunction with Indiana State University offered a 13-week training program via distance education utilizing Blackboard.  Participants in the program are using Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille (API-UEB) as a guide to learning UEB.  Throughout the program, instructors answered questions and provided feedback on quizzes prior to the final exam.

  • UEB Ready? Teaching the Technology (Spring 2015)

This training provided an opportunity for vendors to share information about technology that supports Unified English Braille (UEB).  Participants were presented with the capabilities of various devices and how to utilize these devices with students thereby allowing teachers to make informed recommendations on the device(s) that will best meet the needs of students. This training was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.  Students and their parents are encouraged to attend.

  • UEB Ready? Teaching the Software (Spring 2015)

In this training, participants learned how to utilize the Duxbury Braille Translation software to become more efficient in their ability to transcribe and produce needed braille instructional materials in UEB.  It was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.

  • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Parents (Fall 2015)

A webinar was developed with parents in mind directly addressing their questions or concerns regarding the transition to UEB. To access the webinar, follow the link below: http://bit.ly/uebparentwebinar

  • UEB Ready? Teaching the Transition (Fall 2015)

This training provided strategies and resources to assist Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision when teaching the transition from EBAE to UEB.

Resources

The IERC website will post UEB information, resources, and updates. UEB information can be found at the IERC website or by visiting the BANA website:


UEB Implementation Committee Members

Leslie Durst, Facilitator - Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center 

Katie Crawford - BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools 

Rhoda Davis - Braille Instructor, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Jim Durst - Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired 

Robert Eutz - Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP), Miami Correctional Facility

Martha LaBounty - Database Librarian, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Jeanne Lee - BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

Matt Maurer – Professor, Butler University 

Bill Powell - BOSMA Enterprises

Daniel McNulty - Director, PATINS Project

Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Carol Wetherell - Director, Indiana State University, Blumberg Center

Kristan Sievers-Coffer - Special Education Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

Karen Stein - Special Programs Assessment Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

Marcee Wilburn - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

Jay Wilson - Principal, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

UEB Implementation Sub-Committee Members

Marcee Wilburn, Facilitator - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

Lynda Blaising – BLV Consultant, Northeast Indiana Special Education Cooperative

Katie Crawford – BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools

Jim Durst –Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Leslie Durst – Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Nanette Galloway – BLV Consultant, Elkhart County Special Education Cooperative

Alessandra Kester – BLV HS Life Skills Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Jeanne Lee – BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

Shelby Metzler – BLV Consultant, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

Rhonda Rhoades – BLV Consultant, North Central Indiana Special Education Cooperative

Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

Lisa Starrfield – BLV Mathematics Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Read more

App List

AbleRoad iOS App is a free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairments. Requires iOS 5.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

Access Together, is an app designed to help people with disabilities locate accessible restaurants, shops and other venues in their communities. For more information, visit: http://www.accesstogether.org/.

AccessNote, an iOS notetaking app for the classroom from the American Foundation for the Blind, is available from the iTunes App store. Cost: $19.99. The app requires iOS 7.1 or later and is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information visit iTunes

Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.


Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built-in screen reader. Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download)
which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at 
https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.


Better Vision All-in-One Reading App is a mobile app for iOS and Android devices that magnifies text, provides contrast and color filters to improve clarity, and can read text aloud. The Zoom-in Magnification enlarges text and images from 2x to 10x; the reading lamp works on mobile devices that have a built-in light function; the text-to-speech reads text aloud in four languages (English, German, Dutch, and Spanish); and the Contrast Enhancing Filters allow the choice of six color scheme settings, including high contrast white on black. Cost: $5.99 from the app store or on Play Google. For more information, click here.

Braille Driller- An app for people who want learn the Braille alphabet.  Includes a review of the Braille alphabet and four activities of increasing difficulty. For use on the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

Braille Now - An app designed to teach sighted persons how to recognize the Braille letters a-z. For use on iPad. $0.99 from iTunes.

Braille Sonar - This app allows for the lookup of Contracted Braille symbols, somb basic computer braille symbols and Nemeth Code.  Free from iTunes.  Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Color ID Free - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.  For use on iPad, iPod Touch(fourth generation and newer), iPad 2 and Android. Free from iTunes.

Color Identifier - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.$4.99 from iTunes.

Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

Disney Movies Anywhere App - Every Pixar film is now available with Mobile Audio Description from Disney using the Disney Movies Anywhere app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/disney-movies-anywhere-watch/id766894692?mt=8

DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

Dragon Dictation - Dictate message and Dragon types it out on the screen.  Options include text message, email, copy-and-past, Facebook, and Twitter.  Works on iPad, iPhone, and on second and third generation iPod Touch (external microphone required).  Free from iTunes

eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.

Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

EyeHope Magnifier - Turns iPhone into a powerful magnifier (1-100x magnification). Four high-contrast modes for low vision users. For use with iPhone or iPod Touch. $.99 from iTunes.

Fleksy - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

Learning Ally Audio - Learning Ally members to download DAISY audio Learning Ally titles from onto iOS devices, i.e. iPad, iPhone and iPod. Membership is required.  The app is free from iTunes.

Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

LookTel Money Reader - Identifies type of bills using the iPhone or iPod Touch.  $9.99 from iTunes.

LookTel VoiceOver Tutorial App - Learn and Practice the Basic Gestures used with VoiceOver and iOS.  For more information visit Applevis.  App is free from iTunes.  

MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.  http://mpaja.com/frontpage/MBraille

Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.


Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

Talking Timer- Designed as an aid in exercise—found useful in kitchen.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $0.99 from iTunes.

Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

ThirdEye Technologies Inc. - ThirdEye restores autonomy to visually impaired persons' lives by enabling them to recognize everyday objects.  Users touch on button and the technology verbally returns back whatever object the user is looking at within seconds (for example a "5 US Dollar Bill" or an "Ibuprofen bottle").  App is free from iTunes.

ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  


Timely-Time Teller iOS app will announce the time at regular intervals and at specific recurring times. Timely-Time Teller requires iOS 6.0 or later, is compatible with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.  It is available for $2.99 from the iTunes App Store

VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

ViA - Visually Impaired Apps. A Free app from Braille Institute of America for the iPhone or iPad to assist blind and low-vision users to easily sort through the 500,000+ apps in the iTunes App Store to locate the apps that were built specifically for visually impaired users.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  Free from iTunes.

VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

Voice Brief - Reads emails, twitter, etc aloud.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $2.99 from iTunes.

Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes App Store for $9.99.

Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.

ZoomReader - Optical Character Recognition allows user text-to-speech on books or menus.  $19.99 on iTunes.

Read more

IERC Indiana UEB Position Statement

UEB Transition and Implementation in Indiana

Indiana Educational Resource Center/ICAM
Position Statement for the Provision of Materials

The Braille Authority of North America (BANA) is the official governing body for braille in the United States. In November 2012, BANA voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while maintaining the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The UEB will replace the English Braille American Edition (EBAE). The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html. BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB).

UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

Textbooks and other instructional materials for students who are blind or have low vision will be provided by the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) via the Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM), per the approved UEB Timeline for Implementation in Indiana, and as indicated below:

•Requests for instructional materials in subjects using literary braille (i.e., social studies and language arts), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2015-16 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades, in subjects using literary braille, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2016-2017 school year.

•Requests for instructional materials in subjects that require math (i.e., science and mathematics), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth for the 2015-2016 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades in technical subjects, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for the 2016-2017 school year. UEB Technical Code will be provided in lieu of UEB with Nemeth Code if the student’s IEP dictates UEB math. BANA’s “Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts” will be followed for UEB with Nemeth Code transcription.

•Instructional materials previously transcribed in EBAE will continue to be made available. The IERC will not convert and produce existing braille files from EBAE into UEB as a policy. The transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC. Students who have been taught EBAE may continue to receive materials originally produced in the EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students, just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

•The provision of textbooks and instructional materials in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code will be dependent on the availability and capacity of certified transcribers.

The IERC is committed to providing access to instructional materials in braille for students who are blind or have low vision, per their IEP, and will continue to work together with schools towards a smooth transition to the UEB.

Transition will be a gradual process over the next few of years. Implementation will involve the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available. Indiana is anticipating full implementation for the 2018-2019 school year.

Read more

IERC Practice

AbleRoad iOS App is a  free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairements.  The app is designed for both iPhone and iPad. For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

Read more

IERC Annual Calendar

First Monday in January
  • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind begins on the first Monday in January. 
February 15
  • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind is completed on the ICAM by IERC appointed Designees.
  • Process for submitting braille orders on the ICAM to the IERC for the next school year begins.
March 15
  • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration Report is submitted to the American Printing House for the Blind by the IERC.
  • Annual IERC Inventory Recall/Reallocation process begins on the ICAM.
May 1
  • Material requests for the next school year are due to be submitted on the ICAM.
May 15
  • Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation process ends.
June 15
  • Materials currently on loan, that have not been renewed or retained during the Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation, are due back at the IERC.
July 15
  • IERC begins shipping materials ordered on the ICAM to the schools. 
October 1
  • Federal Quota allocation is appropriated to the American Printing House for the Blind. The allocation is made available to the IERC/Indiana Department of Education.
December 15
  • School Corporations begin to prepare for the Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind.

Read more

Unified English Braille Code (UEB)

On November 2, 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) passed the motion to officially adopt the Unified English Braille code or UEB in the United States. In November 2013, BANA affirmed January 4, 2016 as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of the UEB. This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. The forum involved 48 delegates representing 31 organizations from the braille community. Read more here.

The IERC has been preparing for the rollout of UEB since 2012. Our braille transcribers have trained and received certification in the new code and have actively been transcribing instructional materials in UEB. The IERC has worked closely with the Indiana State University Blumberg Center, PASS Project, to develop and conduct training for teachers and paraprofessionals who will be responsible for instructing our braille readers in the new code. Student instruction has begun for all grades and the IERC is transcribing all new requests in UEB and UEB/Nemeth.

Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline Webpage     PDF
Indiana UEB Position Statement Webpage     PDF
Indiana Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code PDF
UEB and Nemeth Code Power Point  PDF 

Considerations for States Providing Materials in Braille, NCEO Webpage

Duxbury

Using Duxbury Software to Create Braille Documents Webinar 2017 Pass Project

https://my.yuja.com/V/Video?v=81219&node=252679&a=1991009257&autoplay=1

Using Word and Duxbury to Create Braille Documents: PowerPoint Presentations and Handouts

Duxbury BANA Template Part I
Duxbury BANA Template Part II

Part II Handouts
     Example 1 Paragraphs
     Example 2 Lists
     Example 3 Directions with Exercise Sentences
     Example 4 Multiple Choice

Student Instruction Programs

Mangold Braille Program, Basic Braille

This program consists of a variety of components. Unit 1 Tracking and Unit 2 Alphabet Program Kit will help beginning braille readers of all ages by providing a solid foundation on which to build future reading skills. For young, beginning braille learners, rapid finger movement is fostered, and finger movements that are counterproductive are discouraged. This program will also help experienced readers who demonstrate scrubbing, backtracking, and braille letter or number reversal errors. Adults who have experienced recent vision loss will also benefit from this program. The first fifteen lessons of this program develop tactile discrimination, proper hand position, and rapid tracking. The last fifteen lessons systematically introduce the letters of the alphabet. Each lesson includes criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, and more. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet.

Unit 3: UEB Contractions, Part A-E, was written for new readers who already know the braille alphabet and is divided into five parts so that teachers are better able to tailor the program to individual student needs. The parts are designed to be taught in order, but a student can skip a part if the teacher of the visually impaired has determined that the student has already mastered the contractions taught in that part. Unit 3: UEB Contractions is designed to help teachers of the visually impaired teach reading skills while teaching the braille code. All of the parts in Unit 3 are controlled for contractions and contain both reading and writing exercises. Common words and contractions, that beginning readers encounter, are introduced early in the program to help facilitate early reading. Punctuation and common math symbols are also introduced. The reading exercises include repeated readings, sentence tracking, multiple choice questions and clue activities. The writing exercises include sentence copying, sentence starters and open-ended questions.

Mangold Nemeth Code Number Recognition Program Kit was designed for students who are ready to learn the letters of the alphabet and are also ready to learn Nemeth numerals. This program introduces the braille numerals 0-9 and teaches rapid and accurate braille numeral recognition. The program is designed to avoid reversal errors. It provides practice in tracking numbers horizontally and vertically. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet. The student workbook contains criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, sample number lines, and more.

Mangold UEB Number Recognition Program Kit introduces the UEB braille numerals 0-9 and teaches rapid and accurate braille numeral recognition. The program is designed to avoid reversal errors. It provides practice in tracking numbers horizontally and vertically. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet. The student workbook contains criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, sample number lines, and more.

Building on Patterns (BOP)


Building on Patterns (BOP) is a complete primary literacy program designed to teach beginning braille users all language arts – reading, writing, and spelling. The BOP series addresses phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and oral vocabulary. It is currently being updated for the UEB. Available from the American Printing House for the Blind.www.aph.org.

BRAILLE TOO: THE NEXT GENERATION

The long-awaited revision of the 1994 Braille Too curriculum is here! Like BRL2 Publishing’s previous products, it will be available exclusively in digital format on a USB drive, which will allow an individual teacher to print/emboss whatever copies they need for themselves and their students.

Braille Too: The Next Generation retains the format and some of the content of the original curriculum but has changed and added content, which has been reorganized from 10 units in the original to 11 units in Braille Too: The Next Generation in order to accommodate the many symbols added in Unified English Braille. The teacher’s edition (available in either print or braille) contains over 1,000 pages, with over 600 pages of student braille reading exercises and 200 pages of large print writing exercises. Braille student and teacher editions are provided in both Duxbury and BRF formats so they can either be embossed or used on a refreshable braille device.

An introductory price of $400 for the complete curriculum with print teacher’s edition ($500 with braille teacher’s edition) is guaranteed through the end of 2017. Shipping is currently $2.67 for up to 4 USB drives in the same mailer (shipping rates subject to change by the USPS). Purchase orders can be e-mailed to info@brl2.com; checks or money orders can be mailed to the address below. (No credit cards accepted at this time.)
For shipping rates on more than 4 copies, rates on insurance (which is optional), or other information regarding Braille Too: The Next Generation, please contact BRL2 Publishing at info@brl2.com or call 801-572-5427.

BRL2 Publishing
11647 S 2220 E
Sandy, UT 84092

Braille FUNdamentals

Braille FUNdamentals is a comprehensive program for teaching the Braille code. It is currently being revised for the UEB. The sequence for introducing the Braille configurations has been organized into 56 clusters of letters, numerals, contractions, short forms, punctuation and special signs, with specific clusters devoted to the reading and writing practice of previously learned contractions. Also included in this curriculum are a Pre-Braille Assessment, Braille Checklists and ideas for games. This program can be used with beginning braille readers, as well as those readers who need to learn braille when they are older.

Unified English Braille (UEB) Practice sentences: Reading & Writing Exercises to Promote Speed and Accuracy

Provides comprehensive practice sentences for each braille contraction, set up in a sequential, easy-to-learn format.  All UEB contractions are included, as well as many of the more commonly used punctuation and symbols.  Only preciously taught contractions are used in each sentence.  This tool can be used for any aged student who is familiar with the braille alphabet, parents or anyone who would like to learn the braille code. Visit: https://www.actualtactuals.com/


Paths To Literacy UEB Lessons

The staff at Paths to Literacy for Student Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired have been creating and adding new UEB lessons to their website. These lessons are focused on helping older students make the transition from EBAE to UEB. http://www.pathstoliteracy.org/search/node/ueb

UEB Charts

UEB Numeric Flowchart
Kathy Kremplewksi from the Florida Instructional Materials Center, created a UEB Numeric Indicator Flowchart. From Kathy: “I think of “modes” kind of like roads. So, the numeric indicator starts two parallel “roads”, one for grade 1 mode and one for numeric mode. But what stops each “road” is different. The second box lists things that do not stop either “road”, so grade 1 mode and numeric mode continue. The third box lists things that stop numeric mode but does not stop grade 1 mode. Our two parallel “roads” have become one “road”. Finally, the last box lists what stops grade 1 mode. Hopefully this analogy and the flowchart help simplify this concept a little."

Duxbury UEB Chart

Duxbury's one-page chart listing the contractions and short forms in alphabetical order:http://duxburysystems.com/images/ueb_black.pdf

Aroga Technologies UEB Chart
Aroga Technologies presents the UEB contractions and symbols by category:http://www.aroga.com/unified-english-braille-chart-tabloid-11-x-17-pdf-format/

Nemeth-UEB Guidance

Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts

This is a revision of the provisional guidance issued earlier by BANA regarding the method of switching between the Nemeth Code and Unified English Braille.

Music Braille Code 2015

BANA is pleased to announce the publication of the new Music Braille Code, 2015. This completely revised publication is available for free download in two electronic versions: PDF and BRF. Hardcopy versions will also be produced and sold by the American Printing House for the Blind.

To access the Music Braille Code in a PDF file, go to http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/Music_Braille_Code_2015.pdf.

To access the Music braille Code in a BRF file, go to http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/music.html.

UEB Tutorials and Resources

  • Scalar’s Publishing :
    • Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille ISBN 978-0-9960353-0-9 $98.50
    • Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction Companion Reader: Unified English Braille ISBN 978-0-9960353-2-3 $38.50
  • Hadley School for the Blind will provide distance education courses on the UEB beginning in January of 2015. These will be available free through their Adult Continuing Education Program (ACE) and the High School Program, or for a fee for professionals seeking CEU credits through their Hadley School for Professional Studies Program (HSPS). The HSPS program provides a certificate for successful completion of the course which notes the CEUs, grade, date completed. It is not based on a semester enrollment, but is an open enrollment.
  • Transcriber’s UEB Course (CNIB) - a self-directed course, covering eleven topics with fifteen practice exercises, for transcribers, proofreaders and BLV/TVI’s.
  • UEB Online, Braille Training for Sighted Learners - a training program created by the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children’s Renwick Centre, Australia. Appropriate for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals.

Information from the Braille Authority of North America (BANA)

Learn UEB

  • NLS Braille Transcriber Course - For information about the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) braille transcriber course: https://nfb.org/braille-transcribing
UEB Literacy consists of two modules that, together, address the literacy aspects of Unified English Braille. Module 1 presents lessons 1-14, and Module 2 presents lessons 15-31.

UEB Introductory Mathematics is presented as ten lessons that address mathematics symbols and expressions that are encountered during the primary years of schooling. It is recommended that the UEB Literacy modules are completed prior to commencing UEB Introductory Mathematics.

UEB Extension Mathematics (available 3rd Quarter 2019) consists of ten lessons that address mathematics symbols and expressions that are encountered during the secondary years of schooling. The UEB Introductory Mathematics module must be completed before commencing the UEB Extension Mathematics module.

Wisconsin UEB online series
  • Introduction to Unified English Braille
  • Unified English Braille for Transcribers
  • Unified English Braille for Vision Teachers

Unified English Braille Online Training (UEBOT)
: Presented by Northern Illinois University
    Unified English Braille through a Powerful and Responsive eLearning Platform (UEB PREP)  Presented by Portland State University
    • Target audience: Consumers who are blind and visually impaired, family members of individuals who are visually impaired, professionals who work with those who are visually impaired
    • Pilot in September 2015 to train those currently familiar with EBAE

    UEB Rules and Guidelines

    UEB Apps



    If you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact Leslie Durst at 317-554-2740 or 800-833-2198: email: Leslie Durst For information on trainings, contact Robin Thoma at Robin.Thoma@indstate.edu 

    To read more about the UEB, please visit BANA or International Council on English Braille.

    Read more

    Vision Resources

    Apps for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    Various apps we found that are useful for Blind and Low Vision persons using Apple and Andriod products. 

    Accessible MasterMind is an iOS color code-breaking board game.  Crack the code in the fewest tries possible.  Choose a combination using six colors. The game is compatible with VoiceOver. App is $.99 from iTunes.

    Accessible Reading Comparison Chart, developed by Julie Ann Lieberman, MS and Laura Cantagallo, help the user decipher the differences between a number of accessible PDF reading apps available in Google Play.

    Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

    AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

    Ballyland Magic App by Sonokids is an educational iPad game that helps young children with vision impairment to learn and practice a number of VoiceOver gestures.

    BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download) which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.

    Braille Tutor, from iEnable, is an app to teach and practice UEB braille skills.  Visit Perkins eLearning to read the app review by Diane Brauner. You can learn more about Braille Tutor by visiting the iEnable website. Braille Tutor is free through the Apple store for lessons 1-19, uncontracted braille. There is a fee for lessons 20-91 in contracted UEB. Free at iTunes.

    Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

    Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

    DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

    Draw2Measure Protractor is a free app for iOS® devices designed for students who are blind and visually impaired, and can be used by sighted students too.  It gives all students an alternative way to measure angles.  Students can place an angle over the screen of a device, such as a phone or tablet, and trace along the sides of the angle with a fingertip or stylus. The app records the locations of the sides and then calculates the angle. For objects that may not fit on a screen, students can find measurements by rotating the device itself, which utilizes the built-in gyroscope sensor to measure the angle. It reports angle measurements in both degrees and radians. Watch a short YouTube video to see the Draw2Measure app in action. Draw2Measure is a free download from the Apple App Store and works with devices running iOS 8 or later. It cannot be downloaded directly from APH. Free on iTunes.

    eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.  

    Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

    Fleksy  - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

    GetThere free app for Android is designed specifically for blind and visually-impaired users. The app does not display a map, but tells the user where they are and how to get to their destination. Navigational guidance automatically talks to the user before and after every intersection. The user can ask GetThere to tell them where they are, simply by shaking their mobile device.

    KNFB Reader App for iOS recently released version 2.7.3 which now allows the user to take a picture by pressing the Volume Up button on their device and the Volume Down button to execute field of view.  Cost $99.99 from iTunes.

    Learning Ally Link for mobile is an educational reading app designed for learning through listening. Learning Ally provides more than 80,000 human-narrated audiobooks and audio textbooks for dyslexic, blind and visually impaired readers.  Free on iTunes.

    Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

    MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.

    Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

    overTHERE is a free, accessibility app that helps individuals who are blind explore and interact with the surrounding environment by using virtual audible signs.  Free from iTunes.

    Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.

    Prizmo Go- Instant Text Capture is a free, iOS app that allows the user to quickly capture printed text with the camera. Recognized and selected text can be read aloud. The app works with VoiceOver, provides spoken guidance prior to shooting and has text-to-speech capabilities for reading printed documents.  Free from iTunes.

    Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

    Seeing AI, developed by Microsoft, has been released to the Apple App Store. The app harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to open up the visual world and describe nearby people, text and objects. The app uses artificial intelligence and the camera on your iPhone to perform a number of useful functions: reading documents, identifying a product based on its barcode, recognizing people based on their face, providing a description, and recognizing images within other apps. Free from iTunes.

    Speech Central - Speech Central is an accessible Windows, Mac, Android and iOS app that lets the user listen to web content such as news, DAISY content and BookShare using synthesized speech.

    Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

    Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

    TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

    ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  

    VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

    VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

    vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

    VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

    VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

    Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes for $9.99.

    Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

    WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.
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    Braille Software Programs

    Career Information

    Eye Disorders

    Guide Dog Agencies

    Indiana O&M Specialists

    Indiana Websites

    National Organizations

    American Academy of Ophthalmology

    American Academy of Optometry

    Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps (TASH)

    American Council of the Blind

    American Diabetes Association

    American Foundation for the Blind

    American Optometric Association

    American Printing House for the Blind

    Assistive Technology Industry Association

    Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AERBVI)

    Association for Retinopathy of Prematurity and Related Diseases (ROP)

    Blind Babies Foundation

    Blind Children’s Center

    Bookshare.org

    Braille Authority of North America (BANA)

    Canadian National Institute for the Blind

    CAST (Center for Applied Special Technology)

    Center for Parent Information and Resources

    Closing the Gap

    Council for Exceptional Children

    Council of Citizens with Low Vision International

    Foundation Fighting Blindness (retinal diseases)

    Hadley School for the Blind

    Helen Keller National Center

    International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

    Learning Ally

    Lighthouse Guild

    National Association for Albinism and Hypopigmentation (NOAH)

    National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE)

    National Center on Deaf-Blindness

    National Center on Disability and Access to Education (NCDAE)

    National Eye Institute

    National Family Association for Deaf-Blind (NFADB)

    National Federation of the Blind

    National Industries for the Blind

    National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

    National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)

    National Organization of Parents of Blind Children

    National Resource Center for Blind Musicians, Music and Arts Center for Humanity

    Prevent Blindness America

    Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision at Mississippi State University

    United States Association for Blind Athletes

    United States Blind Golf Association

    United States Braille Chess Association

    Vision Council of America: Better Vision Institute 

    Parents and Families

    Product Catalogs

    Resources for Learning Braille

    Video Description Resources

    Vision Resources

    Access USA

    AEM (Accessible Educational Materials)

    American Journal of Ophthalmology 
    This site features a searchable database of abstracts from articles incurrent and past issues of the American Journal of Ophthalmology including topics about latest advances in ophthalmic surgical techniques or recent research findings.

    AppAdvice -AppAdvice is the ideal resource on the Web for people looking to discover iOS apps.

    AppleVis -AppleVis is a community-powered website for vision-impaired users of Apple's range of Mac computers, the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

    Best iPad Apps -List of iPad apps for teachers. Ranges from digital story telling to apps to teach creativity.

    Bill of Rights for All Children with Visual Impairments [ ENG ] [ SPAN ] YouTube video

    Blindness Resource Center

    Braille and Large Print Calendars

    Braille Bug

    Braille Help Electronic Mail List

    College Accessibility for Visually Impaired Students --Sponsored by Online Colleges

    Descriptive Video Service

    Disability Data Resource-InfoUse Project

    Guide to Braille Resources

    Guide to Visual Disabilities: How Colleges Help Visually Impaired Students Succeed

    Helping Students with Visual Disabilities: Resources, Tools and Technology to Foster School Success

    Louis Database

    Laser Eye Surgery Hub, UK -This site provides an international collection of online resources regarding blindness and low vision.

    Minimizing Vision Problems in College: A Student’s Guide to Eye Health and Wellness

    Money Readers

    Neuroscience for Kids, Vision

    NIMAC Database

    Paths to Literacy For students who are blind or visually impaired.

    Perkins Scout

    Physical Education (PE) Website at APH 

    Prevent Blindness 

    Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    Vision Associates

    Vision Impaired and Blindness Resources

     

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    News for Parents of Children Who are Blind or Have Low Vision

    Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network 

    Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network provides resources to connect with other parents, including a monthly parent newsletter with helpful tips and resources, as well as tele-support groups and presentations. Visit the Lighthouse Guild website to learn more.

    VO Lab


    VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

    Ballyland Magic App


    Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built in screen reader.  Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

    Storybud

    Storybud is an online story site, developed by a father with low vision so that he could interact with his children during bedtime story time. Storybud provides the online stories in various formats: audio only; a combined text and audio; or text on the screen only. The site is accessible for persons who are visually impaired using speech software. Visit www.storybud.org for more information.

    Center for Parent Information and Resources

    The Center for Parent Information and Resources has an updated fact sheet on children with visual impairment, including blindness. Visit http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/specific-disabilities/ to read more. 

    Learning Ally’s Website Adds Features for Parents


    Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization serving 300,000 children and adults across the U.S. who have visual, learning and reading-based disabilities, has transformed its website and launched new features and services to further benefit its members as well as parents and teachers. Parents can check out the more stremlined and user-friendly web site to access the organization's on-line library of more than 75,000 human-narrated audiobooks, including the world's largest library of audio textbooks. 

    VOICEtext, providing sentence-by-sentence highlighting of text on the screen in sync with audio narration. In its initial stages, this feature is being incorporated into a limited selection of titles in Learning Ally's library, will expand into more titles over time, and will benefit individuals for whom a multi-sensory approach to reading is recommended.

    Perkins Resources

    scout logo transThe Perkins School for the Blind have resources for parent, kids, and teacher that include fiction and non-fiction books and Internet resources. Read more at http://www.perkins.org/history/visit/research-library. Additional teacher resources are located at http://www.perkins.org/elearning.

    Perkins Scout is a searchable database of carefully evaluated online resources related to blindness and visual impairment. The website mascot, a·dog guide·named Scout, will help you retrieve the information you’re looking for; all of it has been reviewed by Perkins experts and organized for your convenience.·More information is available at http://www.perkinselearning.org/scout.

    Free Braille Books

    Seedlings Logo 7 11 newcolorsThrough the Seedlings Book Angel Program, visually-impaired children can receive two free braille books. Choose from print/braille/picture books, print/braille books, or braille only books. Register online at www.seedlings.org.


    Expanded Core Curriculum Resource

    The American Foundation for the Blind and the Perkins School for the Blind provide, a grassroots forum and a central resource and gateway to more information about the Expanded Core Curriculum

    WonderBaby


    WonderBaby.orgwb birds on text small, a project funded by Perkins School for the Blind, is dedicated to helping parents of young children with vision impairments as well as children with multiple disabilities. Much of the content on WonderBaby is provided by parents. They are not just passive observers or consumers of information; many site users comment on articles, answer questions in the Q&A forum, and share hyperlinks to net resources. Some submit original articles. It's in this sharing that WonderBaby earns much of its authenticity. These are real parents with real kids who are blind or visually disabled. They can empathize with other parents seeking answers. Having educated themselves, they feel compelled to give back so that fellow and future parents of children who are blind or visually disabled can also benefit from their experiences.

    Youth Transition Toolkit now available online from Talent Knows No Limits

    The "Youth Transition Toolkit: A Guide for Young People with Disabilities Transitioning to Adulthood" is now available online from Talent Knows No Limits (TKNL), a public information campaign of the California Health Incentives Improvement Project (CHIIP). Developed in partnership with young people, the toolkit is designed as a how-to guide on preparing for transition to adulthood and making choices about their own health care, education, employment, finances, independent living, and social and recreational activities. Some of the questions the toolkit helps youth address include:
    • What is Transition Planning? What is an IEP and how can I lead my IEP Meeting?
    • How can I manage my Social Security and medical benefits?
    • How does college differ from high school? How can I obtain services for my disability during college?
    • What resources are available to help me choose the right career?
    • Is there assistive technology available that can help me secure a job?
    • How can I find accessible housing to live on my own?
    • What should I do to prepare for a job interview?
    While some of the services and resources provided are California state-specific, much of the guidance is applicable to youth in any state. The toolkit was developed with funding from a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    To learn more, visit the Youth Transition Toolkit website.

    Family Connect

    Do you want to connect with other parents of a blind or visually impaired child? Check out the American Foundation for the Blind’s “Family Connect” web site at http://www.familyconnect.org/parentsitehome.aspx. Information on numerous subjects of interest to parents, such as IEP’s, toys, eye care, etc. can also be found on this site.


    Braille Tales Free Print-Braille Children’s Book Program

    The American Printing House for the Blind is seeking applicants for its free print-braille children’s book program, Braille Tales. Braille Tales collaborates with the Dolly Parton Imagination Library and the Kentucky Correctional Institute to mail 6 print-braille books a year to families with a child and/or a parent with a visual impairment.

    Braille Tales is designed specifically for blind preschool children (age 0-5) and their families to foster early literacy and familiarity with braille. The program brings accessible, age-appropriate books into the homes of children who might not otherwise experience braille until they begin school.



    National Braille Press, Programs Promoting Braille Literacy

    pressHands On! Books for Blind Children is a series of programs for blind children that seek to provide braille books to thousands of blind children and their families throughout every stage of their learning and to provide advocacy and education promoting the benefits of braille. These programs include: Readbooks! Because Braille Matters Family Outreach Program, Bumpy Basics, Children's Braille Book Club, and Lifelong Literacy. Visit the NBP web page for more information about these children’s programs at http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/programs/index.html.

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    International Standard Book Numbers (ISBN)

    What Are They...and, Why Are They So Important?
    Since 2007, the ISBN has been a 13-digit number that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally. Previously, the ISBN was a ten-digit number.

    What is the purpose of an ISBN?
    The purpose of the ISBN is to establish and identify one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition, allowing for more efficient marketing of products by booksellers, libraries, universities, wholesalers and distributors.

    What are the unique characteristics of an ISBN?
    Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN. Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused. An ISBN is printed on the lower portion of the back cover of a book above the bar code and on the copyright page.

    Examples of formats which require a unique ISBN include:
    • Hardcover versions of textbooks
    • Paperbound versions of textbooks
    • Indiana Editions of textbooks
    • National Editions of textbooks
    • Teachers Editions of textbooks
    • Examination copies of textbooks (often shared with districts during district new adoption process)
    • Revised editions of textbooks
    • E-book format of textbooks that are purchased from publisher
    • Etc.
    Some ISBN's end in an "X," in which case enter the "X" into the search string

    Does the ISBN-13 have any meaning imbedded in the numbers?
    The five parts of an ISBN are as follows:
    1. The current ISBN-13 will be prefixed by "978"...usually
    2. Group or country identifier which identifies a national or geographic grouping of publishers
    3. Publisher identifier which identifies a particular publisher within a group
    4. Title identifier which identifies a particular title or edition of a title
    5. Check digit is the single digit at the end of the ISBN which validates the ISBN
    Tricks and Tips to Identifying the Correct ISBN!

    When searching for an ISBN, school-based staff often give the Digital Rights Manager (DRM) the ISBN of the teacher edition or an examination copy.· Both of these editions have a different ISBN number than the student textbook edition ISBN. The IERC requires the student edition ISBN number as all of books we transcribe, produce and provide are student editions.

    The following are TIPS to identifying the correct ISBN:
    • Ask the school-based staff to make a copy of the back cover of the Student Edition of the textbook or a copy of the copyright page.
    • Google the ISBN (the actual number, itself, without the hyphens).· You can also enter the number at www.gettextbooks.com to verify the correct edition and textbook information.
    IMPORTANT NOTE: Do NOT enter the hyphens of the ISBN when searching any database.

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    The IERC Braille Project

    Braille Project Computer Display
    Braille Project Tactile Graphics
    Braille Project Tiger Embosser

    The mission of the Braille Project is to provide high quality, well formatted braille instructional materials in a timely manner to Indiana’s school-age students who are blind or have low vision and whose assessed, primary reading medium is braille.

    Orders for braille instructional materials are submitted thru the ICAM. The IERC assigns transcripts to the Braille Project for instructional materials, currently not available in braille, as their capacity allows.


    The Braille Project utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcribers.

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    The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)

    Miami Logo

    The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) was established in May of 2008 thru the collaborative efforts of the Indiana Department of Corrections, the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired/Indiana Educational Resource Center and the Indiana Department of Education. It is the goal of the project to provide quality braille, large print, and accessible instructional materials to students who are blind or have low vision in Indiana’s local schools, in a timely and efficient manner, while providing a skill to the offenders that will increase employment opportunities thus reducing recidivism.

    MAMP produces and transcribe books from National Instructional Material Accessible Standard (NIMAS) formatted publisher files whenever possible. NIMAS files are electronic publisher files that have been formatted or tagged in a universal format to assist accessible format textbook producers in producing accessible specialized formats in a timely manner. By utilizing NIMAS files, textbooks no longer need to be scanned in or input manually. This significantly speeds up the process of producing braille, large print and digitally rendered textbooks. However, the ICAM can only access NIMAS files from the national repository, the National Instructional Materials Center (NIMAC), if the schools require the publishers per their textbook contracts to send them down to the NIMAC. Be sure to include this contractual language when purchasing textbooks from the publisher to insure that the appropriate files can be secured for production and transcription, especially for core instructional materials not on the state adoption lists. See an example of this contractual language.

    Print copies of the textbooks are still required for production and transcription, along with the NIMAS file, to insure that all text, images, and image descriptions are included and placed in the correct sequence.

    MAMP utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcription.

    Miami01
    Miami02
    Miami03

    MAMPStaffPicture2016

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    IERC Federal Quota Annual Census/Registration of Legally Blind Students

    The IERC administers the Federal Quota dollars for the State of Indiana through the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) and registers all eligible legally blind students, public and private, with APH.

    Each year during the month of January, Authorized Officials or their Designees are asked to participate in the "Annual Census of Students Who Are Legally Blind". The purpose of the registration is to enroll eligible students who meet the legal definition of blindness to generate Federal Quota dollars.

    In order for the State of Indiana to participate in the Federal "Act to Promote the Education of the Blind", the registration status of all students who are legally blind is reviewed annually. The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) administers the federal quota allocation for all states, including Indiana. Funds are appropriated by Congress to APH for the production of specialized instructional materials to be used by students who are legally blind. The appropriated amount is then divided into separate accounts within each state according to the number of students who are legally blind reported in an annual registration. Students must be legally blind, enrolled in educational programs below the college level and have a parental consent form, in English  or  Spanish , on file in order to be eligible for inclusion on the list sent by the IERC to APH. For additional information regarding the parental consent process, read our consent to release student information talking points as well a short FAQ document.

    Schools or agencies may order items available from APH federal quota allocation equal to the funds generated by the number of students who are legally blind registered by them each year. So long as funds are available within a given year, the IERC will honor any reasonable and legitimate request for APH material that is approved by the designated contact person. Items ordered with APH federal quota funds must originally be used by students who are legally blind and generated the dollars. Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.

    For more information regarding the federal quota, visit: APH Federal Quota Overview

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    IERC (Indiana Educational Resource Center)

    Student using a Braille Notetaker

    Student using a Braille Notetaker

    Student reading a braille book

    Student reading a braille book

    Student using a Digital Player/Recorder

    Student using a Digital Player/Recorder


    • The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) is a statewide, centralized depository of specialized formats for school-age students who are blind or visually impaired enrolled in local education agencies. These formats include braille and large print instructional materials, as well as tangible aids and equipment specifically designed for use by students with visual impairments.

      The IERC collaborates with the PATINS Project, Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM) for the provision of services. Request for instructional materials, for school-age students who are blind or have low vision, are submitted to the ICAM by the LEA appointed Digital Right’s Managers (DRM) and are processed by the IERC. All materials are provided at no cost to eligible students and are on loan to the ordering local education agencies.

      In addition to the centralized, statewide depository, the IERC also houses and manages a Braille Transcription Project and oversees the Miami Accessible Media Project located at the Miami Correctional Facility in Bunker Hill, Indiana.

      Indiana Education Resource Center Brochure

    • IERC Protocol for COVID-19 Mail Handling and Cleaning

      ICAM Textbook Ordering

      Please keep the orders coming in for next school year so we have as much time as possible for production of large print and braille instructional materials. When ordering, please confirm that the schools will be open to receive materials at that location over the summer. Given our current situation, BLV teachers/consultants can continue to choose to have textbooks shipped to their home address as we have done for the last few months. Please provide Martha LaBounty in our office with your home location information so she can update that in our system when placing orders.

      A reminder…If you search the ICAM for an item and your results are unsuccessful, you may place a Special Request for that item. To place a special request, log in to the ICAM. On the main page, select Special Request and enter data or after you have searched the ICAM with the ISBN or APH catalog number, you will also have the option to place a “Special Request.”

      IERC Material Returns

      We are getting books and equipment returns coming in from the 2019-2020 school year.  Thank you for making the effort to gather up materials from schools and student homes and returning them to the IERC so we can get them cleaned up, checked back in and recirculated! We understand that this has been an unusual time for all of us, and some of you may not be able to gather up materials at this time but we appreciate your time and effort getting this completed when you can.

      Be sure to return any Perkins SmartBraillers and MATT Connects per the loan agreement.  Also, any professional publications need to be returned as well.  

      Due to the current COVID-19 situation, it would be preferable to return materials via mail service so we can follow our mail handling protocol to store incoming materials for 24 hours prior to opening boxes. However, for those who prefer to hand deliver returns to the IERC, please call ahead and schedule a time for your delivery. We will be practicing proper social distancing protocol. 

      We do ask to please clean all materials before returning to the IERC.  IERC staff will also be performing an additional deep cleaning of materials prior to putting them on our shelves or recirculating the materials.To view our mail handling protocol, please visit our webpage.

      When returning materials to the IERC, please visit our webpage to access return Free Matter for the Blind mailing labels. Please be sure to complete the return address as this helps us sort incoming materials that come off the mail truck. We would appreciate you notifying us of any discrepancies in your shipments using the Inventory Return Forms. This would include missing or damaged volumes or missing or damaged parts of returned kits.

      Annual Inventory Recall Process

      Information regarding the Annual Inventory Recall Process has been sent out to all BLV’s. We appreciate those teachers who have been updating their information. If you know you will be renewing or reassigning instructional materials or specialized equipment for your students, we would appreciate you logging into the ICAM and updating that information. That will let us know which copies of materials will not be available for loan from our collection and help us project production needs.

      IERC Shipment Confirmation

      A packing slip will be enclosed in each shipment the IERC sends out this summer.

      Visit the IERC webpage for step-by-step instructions at http://www.patinsproject.com/ierc-policies-and-procedures/packing-slip-delivery-confirmation

      Summer Opportunities for Students with Visual Impairments

      NFB Bell Academy

      The Bell Academy will be free to all participants this year.  NFB is providing all materials needed.  They will be shipped to participants homes prior to their chosen session. Kids will still have time with a licensed TVI every day and they will meet with their peers via Zoom. 

      NFB Bell Dates:

      June 1, 2020 through June 12, 2020

      June 22, 2020 through July 3, 2020

      July 27, 2020 through August 7, 2020

      A Spanish session will be offered during the June 22-July 3, 2020 session.

      If you or any parents you share this information with have any questions, please contact Kimberly Banks at 404-259-2641. To view the registration page, visit the NFB BELL Academy website.

      Virtual ExCEL Camp

      The inaugural Virtual ExCEL Camp will be held from mid-June through mid-August and will include a live hour at 2:00 ET, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and is free to all registrants. The target audience will continue to be for students. Also included are five at-home extension activities for the camp theme. Virtual ExCEL Camp will be separated by age/grade groups. Because students are not always able to attend during the scheduled hour, the sessions will be recorded. Please register your students with their needs and levels in mind. Students will receive a camp shirt and other APH goodies. To learn more and to register, visit the APH Virtual ExCEL Camp webpage.

      Project Inspire

      Project INSPIRE will offer two courses online this summer.

      • Pre-Kindergarten – 1st Grade Students: Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts and Strategies for Supporting the Student in Building Math Skills.
      • An Introduction to Nemeth Code Symbols Used in Grades 2 to 5 and Strategies for Supporting Elementary Students in Building Math Skills.

      Check the Project INSPIRE’s website for updates or follow on Facebook.

      Additional Resources

      The National Center on Accessible Educational Materials has created a webpage dedicated to eLearning and Accessible Materials for All Students. This information may be shared with classroom teachers and other staff to assist in the creation of accessible digital materials.

      Make sure your students are enrolled in Bookshare and/or Learning Ally as well as the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Materials (BARD) and that they have access to these accounts from home. These free reading tools will help your students continue to access information and participate in learning.

      IERC Summer Hours

      The IERC will resume full staffing and hours as of June 1, 2020. Our office will be open from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm each day. If you have questions or need assistance please call our office at 317-554-2740 or 1-800-833-2198 or email us at ierc@isbvik12.org.

      Have a wonderful summer!



    • Hours of Operation: 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. EST

      Mail:
      Indiana Educational Resource Center
      7725 North College Avenue
      Indianapolis, IN 46240-2504

      Phone: (317) 554-2740
      Toll-free: (800) 833-2198
      Fax: (317) 475-9181

      eMail:
      IERCEmail@isbvik12.org
    • Upcoming BLV Trainings

      Check back soon!

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    Frequently Asked Questions

    When should braille and large print instructional materials be ordered?

    All textbook orders for the upcoming school year should be ordered by April 15 of the current school year if possible.  Order all textbooks titles you know that the student will require.  It takes a minimum of 4 months for new braille transcriptions and 3 months for production of large print/accessible files, sometimes longer during the summer peak order season.

    Is there a cost to borrow materials from the IERC?

    LEA's do not have to pay for the materials received from the IERC.  Materials are provided through Federal Quota dollars and Part B discretionary funds and are on loan to the LEA's.  All items are tracked and LEA's are accountable for the return of materials to the IERC when the student has finished using them. 

    Why do you need the ISBN number on textbook orders?

    The ISBN or International Standard Book Number is a unique 13-digit number that identifies one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition.  Prior to 2007, it was a ten-digit number.  Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN.  Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused.  This number helps the IERC pin-point the exact textbook information.  Read more about ISBN numbers here.

    Sometimes classroom teachers provide the wrong textbook information to me and I order the wrong large print or braille book. If the IERC provides the book I have ordered, but it is the wrong title or edition, will they provide a second, corrected copy?

    Only if we have it in our collection, ready to loan.  We will not purchase a second copy as these items are very costly.  It is the responsibility of the LEA to insure the accuracy of the order information prior to placing the order the first time.  The IERC will provide the LEA with commercial sources where they can purchase the materials directly if needed.

    Does the IERC supply magnifiers, CCTV's or other non-APH materials?

    No.  The LEA's will need to purchase these materials directly from the commercial vendors.  The LEA's may want to contact the PATINS Project Lending Library for product information or possible equipment loan. http://www.patinsproject.org/

    May DRM's order more that one copy of a braille or large print textbook for a student?

    The IERC will provide one set of textbooks in braille or large print.  It is the LEA's responsibility to provide a second copy if it has been documented as a need on the student's individualized education plan.  The IERC's role is to assist the LEA's in the provision of accessible instructional materials.

    Are the materials ordered with federal quota dollars generated by my students the property of the school or do the materials need to be returned to the IERC?

    Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.  It is the responsibility of the state's Ex Officio (IERC Director) to oversee the federal account, which includes the distribution, tracking, and re-loan of educational materials purchased with quota dollars.  All federal quota dollars as well as materials purchased with those dollars must be accounted for.

    May the student consume braille and large print workbooks?

    Workbooks or consumable textbooks ONLY may be consumed if needed.  If materials are consumed, they must be accounted for during the annual inventory recall process as consumed so we can update our inventory accordingly.

    If my student moves in-state, but to another LEA, can I send his/her materials with them or do they need to be returned to the IERC?

    All materials loaned to an LEA for use by a specific student must be returned to the IERC if the student moves to a different school corporation.  It will be the responsibility of the DRM from the new school corporation to update the student information on the ICAM and to order materials required for use by the student enrolled in the new LEA. 

    If borrowed braille and large print textbooks and specialized aids and equipment are not accounted for or returned to the IERC at the end of each school year, will the ordering district be charged for their replacement?

    The local education agency is ultimately responsible for tracking and accounting for all ordered instructional materials purchased with state and federal dollars and loaned to them by the IERC at the end of each school year.  The IERC reserves the right to charge the ordering local education agency for lost or unaccounted braille and large print books as well as specialized aids and equipment.  For books with multiple volumes, the school district would be charged for the cost to replace the entire book, if the IERC cannot replace individual volumes.

    Why do I need to send two print copies of a textbook for production of transcription?

    If textbooks ordered are not available in large print or braille, two original copies will be requested by the IERC for production or transcription from the LEA.  One copy is torn apart during the production process and kept on site with the master and the second copy, used for proofreading, is returned to the school after production or transcription is complete.  It is the responsibility of the local education agency to provide the requested print copies of the textbooks, not the IERC or the MAMP.  The local education agency can choose not to send print copies to the IERC for production or transcription and can purchase directly from commercial sources if available. 

    Why did the IERC send out a braille copy of the national edition of a book when the state edition was ordered?

    In order to keep costs down and to prevent the transcription of a braille book already available, the IERC reserves the right to substitute the national edition of an ordered state edition if the publisher verifies that the national edition is classroom compatible with the state edition. 

    Will the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) produce accessible versions of any textbook?

    No.  Only accessible derivative versions, as a result of the production of the hard copy large print or transcription of a braille textbook, will be made available in accessible formats as determined appropriate by the MAMP.  Any accessible formats produced by the MAMP will appear in the ICAM during a search if the student has qualified for these specialized formats per their IEP.

    May large print and braille instructional materials be ordered directly from the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)?

    No.  All orders for large print and braille instructional materials must go through the ICAM via the appointed DRM and then to the IERC for review and processing. All orders sent to MAMP originate from the IERC.

    Will the IERC enlarge or transcribe ISTEP preparatory materials?

    The Indiana Educational Resource Center is unable to provide braille or large print copies of ISTEP preparatory materials.  The IERC has been instructed by the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) assessment office that we cannot produce ISTEP materials (even if it is part of a publisher bundle) into an alternate format because these materials are not endorsed by the IDOE. Therefore, because they are not endorsed by the state, we cannot expend our federal Part B dollars to produce alternate formats for our students.  In addition, the material contained in these items, per IDOE, may actually violate the Indiana State Board of Education's Ethical Testing Practices and Procedures.  School corporations are encouraged to use the endorsed ISTEP materials and assessment.

    Will the IERC provide textbooks of a religious nature for a students being served in parentally placed, non-public schools?

    No.  Per the Indiana State Code, we cannot expend federal dollars on the purchase or production of religious curriculum materials for use by students in parentally-placed, non-public schools, including those books from religious publishers. However, if the book is used as part of the local education agency curriculum and has been endorsed by the local education agency, we can provide those titles.

    Does the IERC provide older copyrights or editions of braille and large print textbooks?

    The IERC reserves the right, dependent on funding, to not purchase older copyrights or editions of specialized braille and large print instructional materials.  If the LEA requests an older copyright of a textbook in braille or large print, and the IERC is unable to purchase, the IERC will assist the LEA by researching available commercial vendors for procurement at the local level.  Furthermore, if an LEA writes into a student's individualized education program (IEP) that braille and/or large print textbooks will be provided for a student, it shall not be the ultimate responsibility of the IERC to provide the braille and/or large print textbooks and materials.

    Will the IERC replace braille and large print instructional materials lost by districts?

    Due to limited funds, the IERC cannot replace specialized instructional materials that have been purchased/shipped by the IERC and received at the LEA, then lost or misplaced at the local level.

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    IERC Staff

    NamePositionPhone
    Leslie Durst IERC Director800-833-2198
    317-554-2740
    Martha LaBounty IERC Librarian800-833-2198
    317-554-2740
    Betsy Scott IERC Braille Project Manager800-833-2198
    317-554-2740
    Robert Eutz Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)800-833-2198
    317-554-2740
    Nonna Cortez Braille Transcriber800-833-2198
    317-554-2740
    Eric Kindler IERC Orders and Materials Specialist800-833-2198
    317-554-2740

    Read more

    Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline

    Unified English Braille

    Timeline for Implementation in Indiana

    Compiled by Indiana UEB Implementation Committee

    August 21, 2014; Revised April 13, 2015; November 16, 2015

    Unified English Braille Code

    In November 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while continuing the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html.

    BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB). This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. For more information visit the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/pressreleases/pr-2013-11-26.html.

    Indiana Statewide UEB Transition

    Indiana has been actively working on the transition to UEB. A statewide stakeholders committee met in 2014 and 2015, and will continue to meet ongoing to further develop/refine Indiana’s state plan for UEB implementation and to guide the transition. The UEB Implementation Committee consists of representatives from the Statewide Resource Center, State AT Project, University Training Programs, Adult Services, Residential School and Outreach Staff, TBLV’s from around the state, Prison Braille Program, Braille Transcribers, and the Indiana Department of Education.

    The Indiana UEB state plan was submitted to and approved by the Indiana Department of Education in September 2014. To date: transcribers have trained in the UEB and received their Canadian UEB certification. They are currently seeking U.S. national UEB certification; university programs have implemented UEB coursework for their teacher training programs; and workshops, conferences and webinars have and will be conducted for BLV teaching and paraprofessional staff.

    Considerations for Math Code

    UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

    As a default, requests for instructional materials for subjects that require math code (i.e., science and mathematics), for all grades, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for mathematics.  UEB will be provided in lieu of Nemeth Code only if the student’s IEP dictates UEB for math instruction.  The Case Conference Committee (CCC) must determine if UEB or UEB with Nemeth better meets the instructional needs of the student.

    When it is determined that braille is a consideration for the student who is blind, then the code for the instruction of math/technical subjects (Nemeth or UEB) will need to be specified and a written justification provided.

    To view “Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code” developed by the UEB Implementation Sub-Committee, click here

    Timeline

    The transition to UEB from EBAE in Indiana will be a six year plan, based on a school year calendar.  It began with the 2013-2014 SY and will run through the 2018-2019 SY.  Full implementation of the UEB (i.e. instruction, materials, assessment) is targeted for the 2018-2019 SY.

    Each local education agency (LEA), based on the approved state timeline, will be responsible for developing a plan for implementation of the UEB at the local level to meet the full implementation UEB date. The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) will work closely with LEA’s to best meet the educational braille needs of individual students.

    Implementation of this timeline involves the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available.

    Timeline Breakdown

    2013-2014 SY

    • Transcriber training.

    • Research and begin drafting state plan.

       

    2014-2015 SY

    • Transcriber training and certification.

    • Approval of a state plan for UEB implementation.

    • Statewide UEB professional development for BLV teacher and paraprofessional staff (workshops, conferences, braille training, webinars and UEB resources).

    • January 2015

      • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2015-2016 school year, for Grades K-5.

      • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

      • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

      • Spring 2015

    IDOE provides state assessments in EBAE/Nemeth.

    2015-2016 SY

    • September 2015

    Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in Grades K-5.  Begin using available UEB materials.

    • January 2016

      • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2016-2017 school year, for all grades.

      • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

      • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

      • Spring 2016

        IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth as well as EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 3-5 and EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 6 and up.

    2016-2017 SY

    • September 2016

    Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in grades 6 and up. Begin using available UEB materials.

    • January 2017

      • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

      • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

      • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

      • Spring 2017

        IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

    2017-2018 SY

    • September 2017

      Continue UEB instruction as needed for remaining students, move in and transfer students.

    • January 2018

      • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

      • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

      • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

      • Spring 2018

    IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

    2018-2019

    • Complete UEB transition. All school-age materials will be produced in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth.  All students who read braille will be expected to access material produced in UEB.

    • Based on availability of UEB, existing materials transcribed in EBAE may continue to be provided.

      • Spring 2019

    IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

    UEB Trainings and Learning Opportunities

    Training will be provided by the PASS (Promoting Achievement for Students with Sensory Loss) Project, Blumberg Center, Indiana State University in collaboration with the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) and the PATINS (Promoting Achievement Through Technology and Instruction for all Student) Project, through 2015. Additional trainings after 2015 will be provided as needed.

    • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille (Fall 2014)

    UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille was intended to educate and prepare teachers and staff in order to facilitate a smooth transition from EBAE to UEB.  Six regional trainings provided a comparison of English Braille American Edition (EBAE) and UEB.  Teachers and staff participated in hands-on exercises specific to UEB.

    • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille Webinar (Fall 2014)

    A webinar was developed as a resource and for those unable to attend the regional trainings.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:http://dgmpresentations.pbworks.com/w/page/90921945/UEB%20Intro%20Videos

    • UEB Ready? ListServ (Fall 2014)

    An e-mail discussion listserv has been created to provide a communication tool for teachers and staff to ask questions, share resources and strategies, and discuss important issues specific to the implementation of Unified English Braille (UEB).  Transcribers, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals working with students who utilize braille as their literacy mode are participating in this forum.

    • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Directors of Special Education (Fall 2014)

    A webinar was developed to address questions and concerns specific to Directors of Special Education in Indiana regarding the transition to UEB.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:

    https://tegr.it/y/1hqfn

    • UEB Ready?  A Supported Independent Study (Spring 2015 & Summer 2015)

    The PASS Project in conjunction with Indiana State University offered a 13-week training program via distance education utilizing Blackboard.  Participants in the program are using Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille (API-UEB) as a guide to learning UEB.  Throughout the program, instructors answered questions and provided feedback on quizzes prior to the final exam.

    • UEB Ready? Teaching the Technology (Spring 2015)

    This training provided an opportunity for vendors to share information about technology that supports Unified English Braille (UEB).  Participants were presented with the capabilities of various devices and how to utilize these devices with students thereby allowing teachers to make informed recommendations on the device(s) that will best meet the needs of students. This training was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.  Students and their parents are encouraged to attend.

    • UEB Ready? Teaching the Software (Spring 2015)

    In this training, participants learned how to utilize the Duxbury Braille Translation software to become more efficient in their ability to transcribe and produce needed braille instructional materials in UEB.  It was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.

    • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Parents (Fall 2015)

    A webinar was developed with parents in mind directly addressing their questions or concerns regarding the transition to UEB. To access the webinar, follow the link below: http://bit.ly/uebparentwebinar

    • UEB Ready? Teaching the Transition (Fall 2015)

    This training provided strategies and resources to assist Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision when teaching the transition from EBAE to UEB.

    Resources

    The IERC website will post UEB information, resources, and updates. UEB information can be found at the IERC website or by visiting the BANA website:


    UEB Implementation Committee Members

    Leslie Durst, Facilitator - Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center 

    Katie Crawford - BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools 

    Rhoda Davis - Braille Instructor, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    Jim Durst - Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired 

    Robert Eutz - Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP), Miami Correctional Facility

    Martha LaBounty - Database Librarian, Indiana Educational Resource Center

    Jeanne Lee - BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

    Matt Maurer – Professor, Butler University 

    Bill Powell - BOSMA Enterprises

    Daniel McNulty - Director, PATINS Project

    Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

    Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

    Carol Wetherell - Director, Indiana State University, Blumberg Center

    Kristan Sievers-Coffer - Special Education Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

    Karen Stein - Special Programs Assessment Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

    Marcee Wilburn - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

    Jay Wilson - Principal, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    UEB Implementation Sub-Committee Members

    Marcee Wilburn, Facilitator - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

    Lynda Blaising – BLV Consultant, Northeast Indiana Special Education Cooperative

    Katie Crawford – BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools

    Jim Durst –Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    Leslie Durst – Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center

    Nanette Galloway – BLV Consultant, Elkhart County Special Education Cooperative

    Alessandra Kester – BLV HS Life Skills Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    Jeanne Lee – BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

    Shelby Metzler – BLV Consultant, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

    Rhonda Rhoades – BLV Consultant, North Central Indiana Special Education Cooperative

    Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

    Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

    Lisa Starrfield – BLV Mathematics Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

    Read more

    App List

    AbleRoad iOS App is a free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairments. Requires iOS 5.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

    Access Together, is an app designed to help people with disabilities locate accessible restaurants, shops and other venues in their communities. For more information, visit: http://www.accesstogether.org/.

    AccessNote, an iOS notetaking app for the classroom from the American Foundation for the Blind, is available from the iTunes App store. Cost: $19.99. The app requires iOS 7.1 or later and is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information visit iTunes

    Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

    AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.


    Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built-in screen reader. Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

    BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download)
    which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at 
    https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.


    Better Vision All-in-One Reading App is a mobile app for iOS and Android devices that magnifies text, provides contrast and color filters to improve clarity, and can read text aloud. The Zoom-in Magnification enlarges text and images from 2x to 10x; the reading lamp works on mobile devices that have a built-in light function; the text-to-speech reads text aloud in four languages (English, German, Dutch, and Spanish); and the Contrast Enhancing Filters allow the choice of six color scheme settings, including high contrast white on black. Cost: $5.99 from the app store or on Play Google. For more information, click here.

    Braille Driller- An app for people who want learn the Braille alphabet.  Includes a review of the Braille alphabet and four activities of increasing difficulty. For use on the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

    Braille Now - An app designed to teach sighted persons how to recognize the Braille letters a-z. For use on iPad. $0.99 from iTunes.

    Braille Sonar - This app allows for the lookup of Contracted Braille symbols, somb basic computer braille symbols and Nemeth Code.  Free from iTunes.  Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

    Color ID Free - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.  For use on iPad, iPod Touch(fourth generation and newer), iPad 2 and Android. Free from iTunes.

    Color Identifier - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.$4.99 from iTunes.

    Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

    Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

    Disney Movies Anywhere App - Every Pixar film is now available with Mobile Audio Description from Disney using the Disney Movies Anywhere app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/disney-movies-anywhere-watch/id766894692?mt=8

    DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

    Dragon Dictation - Dictate message and Dragon types it out on the screen.  Options include text message, email, copy-and-past, Facebook, and Twitter.  Works on iPad, iPhone, and on second and third generation iPod Touch (external microphone required).  Free from iTunes

    eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.

    Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

    EyeHope Magnifier - Turns iPhone into a powerful magnifier (1-100x magnification). Four high-contrast modes for low vision users. For use with iPhone or iPod Touch. $.99 from iTunes.

    Fleksy - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

    Learning Ally Audio - Learning Ally members to download DAISY audio Learning Ally titles from onto iOS devices, i.e. iPad, iPhone and iPod. Membership is required.  The app is free from iTunes.

    Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

    LookTel Money Reader - Identifies type of bills using the iPhone or iPod Touch.  $9.99 from iTunes.

    LookTel VoiceOver Tutorial App - Learn and Practice the Basic Gestures used with VoiceOver and iOS.  For more information visit Applevis.  App is free from iTunes.  

    MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.  http://mpaja.com/frontpage/MBraille

    Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

    Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.


    Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

    Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

    Talking Timer- Designed as an aid in exercise—found useful in kitchen.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $0.99 from iTunes.

    Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

    TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

    ThirdEye Technologies Inc. - ThirdEye restores autonomy to visually impaired persons' lives by enabling them to recognize everyday objects.  Users touch on button and the technology verbally returns back whatever object the user is looking at within seconds (for example a "5 US Dollar Bill" or an "Ibuprofen bottle").  App is free from iTunes.

    ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  


    Timely-Time Teller iOS app will announce the time at regular intervals and at specific recurring times. Timely-Time Teller requires iOS 6.0 or later, is compatible with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.  It is available for $2.99 from the iTunes App Store

    VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

    VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

    vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

    ViA - Visually Impaired Apps. A Free app from Braille Institute of America for the iPhone or iPad to assist blind and low-vision users to easily sort through the 500,000+ apps in the iTunes App Store to locate the apps that were built specifically for visually impaired users.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  Free from iTunes.

    VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

    Voice Brief - Reads emails, twitter, etc aloud.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $2.99 from iTunes.

    Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes App Store for $9.99.

    Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

    WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.

    ZoomReader - Optical Character Recognition allows user text-to-speech on books or menus.  $19.99 on iTunes.

    Read more

    IERC Indiana UEB Position Statement

    UEB Transition and Implementation in Indiana

    Indiana Educational Resource Center/ICAM
    Position Statement for the Provision of Materials

    The Braille Authority of North America (BANA) is the official governing body for braille in the United States. In November 2012, BANA voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while maintaining the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The UEB will replace the English Braille American Edition (EBAE). The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html. BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB).

    UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

    Textbooks and other instructional materials for students who are blind or have low vision will be provided by the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) via the Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM), per the approved UEB Timeline for Implementation in Indiana, and as indicated below:

    •Requests for instructional materials in subjects using literary braille (i.e., social studies and language arts), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2015-16 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades, in subjects using literary braille, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2016-2017 school year.

    •Requests for instructional materials in subjects that require math (i.e., science and mathematics), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth for the 2015-2016 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades in technical subjects, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for the 2016-2017 school year. UEB Technical Code will be provided in lieu of UEB with Nemeth Code if the student’s IEP dictates UEB math. BANA’s “Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts” will be followed for UEB with Nemeth Code transcription.

    •Instructional materials previously transcribed in EBAE will continue to be made available. The IERC will not convert and produce existing braille files from EBAE into UEB as a policy. The transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC. Students who have been taught EBAE may continue to receive materials originally produced in the EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students, just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

    •The provision of textbooks and instructional materials in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code will be dependent on the availability and capacity of certified transcribers.

    The IERC is committed to providing access to instructional materials in braille for students who are blind or have low vision, per their IEP, and will continue to work together with schools towards a smooth transition to the UEB.

    Transition will be a gradual process over the next few of years. Implementation will involve the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available. Indiana is anticipating full implementation for the 2018-2019 school year.

    Read more

    IERC Practice

    AbleRoad iOS App is a  free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairements.  The app is designed for both iPhone and iPad. For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

    Read more

    IERC Annual Calendar

    First Monday in January
    • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind begins on the first Monday in January. 
    February 15
    • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind is completed on the ICAM by IERC appointed Designees.
    • Process for submitting braille orders on the ICAM to the IERC for the next school year begins.
    March 15
    • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration Report is submitted to the American Printing House for the Blind by the IERC.
    • Annual IERC Inventory Recall/Reallocation process begins on the ICAM.
    May 1
    • Material requests for the next school year are due to be submitted on the ICAM.
    May 15
    • Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation process ends.
    June 15
    • Materials currently on loan, that have not been renewed or retained during the Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation, are due back at the IERC.
    July 15
    • IERC begins shipping materials ordered on the ICAM to the schools. 
    October 1
    • Federal Quota allocation is appropriated to the American Printing House for the Blind. The allocation is made available to the IERC/Indiana Department of Education.
    December 15
    • School Corporations begin to prepare for the Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind.

    Read more

    Unified English Braille Code (UEB)

    On November 2, 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) passed the motion to officially adopt the Unified English Braille code or UEB in the United States. In November 2013, BANA affirmed January 4, 2016 as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of the UEB. This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. The forum involved 48 delegates representing 31 organizations from the braille community. Read more here.

    The IERC has been preparing for the rollout of UEB since 2012. Our braille transcribers have trained and received certification in the new code and have actively been transcribing instructional materials in UEB. The IERC has worked closely with the Indiana State University Blumberg Center, PASS Project, to develop and conduct training for teachers and paraprofessionals who will be responsible for instructing our braille readers in the new code. Student instruction has begun for all grades and the IERC is transcribing all new requests in UEB and UEB/Nemeth.

    Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline Webpage     PDF
    Indiana UEB Position Statement Webpage     PDF
    Indiana Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code PDF
    UEB and Nemeth Code Power Point  PDF 

    Considerations for States Providing Materials in Braille, NCEO Webpage

    Duxbury

    Using Duxbury Software to Create Braille Documents Webinar 2017 Pass Project

    https://my.yuja.com/V/Video?v=81219&node=252679&a=1991009257&autoplay=1

    Using Word and Duxbury to Create Braille Documents: PowerPoint Presentations and Handouts

    Duxbury BANA Template Part I
    Duxbury BANA Template Part II

    Part II Handouts
         Example 1 Paragraphs
         Example 2 Lists
         Example 3 Directions with Exercise Sentences
         Example 4 Multiple Choice

    Student Instruction Programs

    Mangold Braille Program, Basic Braille

    This program consists of a variety of components. Unit 1 Tracking and Unit 2 Alphabet Program Kit will help beginning braille readers of all ages by providing a solid foundation on which to build future reading skills. For young, beginning braille learners, rapid finger movement is fostered, and finger movements that are counterproductive are discouraged. This program will also help experienced readers who demonstrate scrubbing, backtracking, and braille letter or number reversal errors. Adults who have experienced recent vision loss will also benefit from this program. The first fifteen lessons of this program develop tactile discrimination, proper hand position, and rapid tracking. The last fifteen lessons systematically introduce the letters of the alphabet. Each lesson includes criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, and more. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet.

    Unit 3: UEB Contractions, Part A-E, was written for new readers who already know the braille alphabet and is divided into five parts so that teachers are better able to tailor the program to individual student needs. The parts are designed to be taught in order, but a student can skip a part if the teacher of the visually impaired has determined that the student has already mastered the contractions taught in that part. Unit 3: UEB Contractions is designed to help teachers of the visually impaired teach reading skills while teaching the braille code. All of the parts in Unit 3 are controlled for contractions and contain both reading and writing exercises. Common words and contractions, that beginning readers encounter, are introduced early in the program to help facilitate early reading. Punctuation and common math symbols are also introduced. The reading exercises include repeated readings, sentence tracking, multiple choice questions and clue activities. The writing exercises include sentence copying, sentence starters and open-ended questions.

    Mangold Nemeth Code Number Recognition Program Kit was designed for students who are ready to learn the letters of the alphabet and are also ready to learn Nemeth numerals. This program introduces the braille numerals 0-9 and teaches rapid and accurate braille numeral recognition. The program is designed to avoid reversal errors. It provides practice in tracking numbers horizontally and vertically. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet. The student workbook contains criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, sample number lines, and more.

    Mangold UEB Number Recognition Program Kit introduces the UEB braille numerals 0-9 and teaches rapid and accurate braille numeral recognition. The program is designed to avoid reversal errors. It provides practice in tracking numbers horizontally and vertically. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet. The student workbook contains criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, sample number lines, and more.

    Building on Patterns (BOP)


    Building on Patterns (BOP) is a complete primary literacy program designed to teach beginning braille users all language arts – reading, writing, and spelling. The BOP series addresses phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and oral vocabulary. It is currently being updated for the UEB. Available from the American Printing House for the Blind.www.aph.org.

    BRAILLE TOO: THE NEXT GENERATION

    The long-awaited revision of the 1994 Braille Too curriculum is here! Like BRL2 Publishing’s previous products, it will be available exclusively in digital format on a USB drive, which will allow an individual teacher to print/emboss whatever copies they need for themselves and their students.

    Braille Too: The Next Generation retains the format and some of the content of the original curriculum but has changed and added content, which has been reorganized from 10 units in the original to 11 units in Braille Too: The Next Generation in order to accommodate the many symbols added in Unified English Braille. The teacher’s edition (available in either print or braille) contains over 1,000 pages, with over 600 pages of student braille reading exercises and 200 pages of large print writing exercises. Braille student and teacher editions are provided in both Duxbury and BRF formats so they can either be embossed or used on a refreshable braille device.

    An introductory price of $400 for the complete curriculum with print teacher’s edition ($500 with braille teacher’s edition) is guaranteed through the end of 2017. Shipping is currently $2.67 for up to 4 USB drives in the same mailer (shipping rates subject to change by the USPS). Purchase orders can be e-mailed to info@brl2.com; checks or money orders can be mailed to the address below. (No credit cards accepted at this time.)
    For shipping rates on more than 4 copies, rates on insurance (which is optional), or other information regarding Braille Too: The Next Generation, please contact BRL2 Publishing at info@brl2.com or call 801-572-5427.

    BRL2 Publishing
    11647 S 2220 E
    Sandy, UT 84092

    Braille FUNdamentals

    Braille FUNdamentals is a comprehensive program for teaching the Braille code. It is currently being revised for the UEB. The sequence for introducing the Braille configurations has been organized into 56 clusters of letters, numerals, contractions, short forms, punctuation and special signs, with specific clusters devoted to the reading and writing practice of previously learned contractions. Also included in this curriculum are a Pre-Braille Assessment, Braille Checklists and ideas for games. This program can be used with beginning braille readers, as well as those readers who need to learn braille when they are older.

    Unified English Braille (UEB) Practice sentences: Reading & Writing Exercises to Promote Speed and Accuracy

    Provides comprehensive practice sentences for each braille contraction, set up in a sequential, easy-to-learn format.  All UEB contractions are included, as well as many of the more commonly used punctuation and symbols.  Only preciously taught contractions are used in each sentence.  This tool can be used for any aged student who is familiar with the braille alphabet, parents or anyone who would like to learn the braille code. Visit: https://www.actualtactuals.com/


    Paths To Literacy UEB Lessons

    The staff at Paths to Literacy for Student Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired have been creating and adding new UEB lessons to their website. These lessons are focused on helping older students make the transition from EBAE to UEB. http://www.pathstoliteracy.org/search/node/ueb

    UEB Charts

    UEB Numeric Flowchart
    Kathy Kremplewksi from the Florida Instructional Materials Center, created a UEB Numeric Indicator Flowchart. From Kathy: “I think of “modes” kind of like roads. So, the numeric indicator starts two parallel “roads”, one for grade 1 mode and one for numeric mode. But what stops each “road” is different. The second box lists things that do not stop either “road”, so grade 1 mode and numeric mode continue. The third box lists things that stop numeric mode but does not stop grade 1 mode. Our two parallel “roads” have become one “road”. Finally, the last box lists what stops grade 1 mode. Hopefully this analogy and the flowchart help simplify this concept a little."

    Duxbury UEB Chart

    Duxbury's one-page chart listing the contractions and short forms in alphabetical order:http://duxburysystems.com/images/ueb_black.pdf

    Aroga Technologies UEB Chart
    Aroga Technologies presents the UEB contractions and symbols by category:http://www.aroga.com/unified-english-braille-chart-tabloid-11-x-17-pdf-format/

    Nemeth-UEB Guidance

    Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts

    This is a revision of the provisional guidance issued earlier by BANA regarding the method of switching between the Nemeth Code and Unified English Braille.

    Music Braille Code 2015

    BANA is pleased to announce the publication of the new Music Braille Code, 2015. This completely revised publication is available for free download in two electronic versions: PDF and BRF. Hardcopy versions will also be produced and sold by the American Printing House for the Blind.

    To access the Music Braille Code in a PDF file, go to http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/Music_Braille_Code_2015.pdf.

    To access the Music braille Code in a BRF file, go to http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/music.html.

    UEB Tutorials and Resources

    • Scalar’s Publishing :
      • Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille ISBN 978-0-9960353-0-9 $98.50
      • Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction Companion Reader: Unified English Braille ISBN 978-0-9960353-2-3 $38.50
    • Hadley School for the Blind will provide distance education courses on the UEB beginning in January of 2015. These will be available free through their Adult Continuing Education Program (ACE) and the High School Program, or for a fee for professionals seeking CEU credits through their Hadley School for Professional Studies Program (HSPS). The HSPS program provides a certificate for successful completion of the course which notes the CEUs, grade, date completed. It is not based on a semester enrollment, but is an open enrollment.
    • Transcriber’s UEB Course (CNIB) - a self-directed course, covering eleven topics with fifteen practice exercises, for transcribers, proofreaders and BLV/TVI’s.
    • UEB Online, Braille Training for Sighted Learners - a training program created by the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children’s Renwick Centre, Australia. Appropriate for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals.

    Information from the Braille Authority of North America (BANA)

    Learn UEB

    • NLS Braille Transcriber Course - For information about the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) braille transcriber course: https://nfb.org/braille-transcribing
    UEB Literacy consists of two modules that, together, address the literacy aspects of Unified English Braille. Module 1 presents lessons 1-14, and Module 2 presents lessons 15-31.

    UEB Introductory Mathematics is presented as ten lessons that address mathematics symbols and expressions that are encountered during the primary years of schooling. It is recommended that the UEB Literacy modules are completed prior to commencing UEB Introductory Mathematics.

    UEB Extension Mathematics (available 3rd Quarter 2019) consists of ten lessons that address mathematics symbols and expressions that are encountered during the secondary years of schooling. The UEB Introductory Mathematics module must be completed before commencing the UEB Extension Mathematics module.

    Wisconsin UEB online series
    • Introduction to Unified English Braille
    • Unified English Braille for Transcribers
    • Unified English Braille for Vision Teachers

    Unified English Braille Online Training (UEBOT)
    : Presented by Northern Illinois University
      Unified English Braille through a Powerful and Responsive eLearning Platform (UEB PREP)  Presented by Portland State University
      • Target audience: Consumers who are blind and visually impaired, family members of individuals who are visually impaired, professionals who work with those who are visually impaired
      • Pilot in September 2015 to train those currently familiar with EBAE

      UEB Rules and Guidelines

      UEB Apps



      If you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact Leslie Durst at 317-554-2740 or 800-833-2198: email: Leslie Durst For information on trainings, contact Robin Thoma at Robin.Thoma@indstate.edu 

      To read more about the UEB, please visit BANA or International Council on English Braille.

      Read more

      Vision Resources

      Apps for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      Various apps we found that are useful for Blind and Low Vision persons using Apple and Andriod products. 

      Accessible MasterMind is an iOS color code-breaking board game.  Crack the code in the fewest tries possible.  Choose a combination using six colors. The game is compatible with VoiceOver. App is $.99 from iTunes.

      Accessible Reading Comparison Chart, developed by Julie Ann Lieberman, MS and Laura Cantagallo, help the user decipher the differences between a number of accessible PDF reading apps available in Google Play.

      Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

      AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

      Ballyland Magic App by Sonokids is an educational iPad game that helps young children with vision impairment to learn and practice a number of VoiceOver gestures.

      BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download) which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.

      Braille Tutor, from iEnable, is an app to teach and practice UEB braille skills.  Visit Perkins eLearning to read the app review by Diane Brauner. You can learn more about Braille Tutor by visiting the iEnable website. Braille Tutor is free through the Apple store for lessons 1-19, uncontracted braille. There is a fee for lessons 20-91 in contracted UEB. Free at iTunes.

      Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

      Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

      DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

      Draw2Measure Protractor is a free app for iOS® devices designed for students who are blind and visually impaired, and can be used by sighted students too.  It gives all students an alternative way to measure angles.  Students can place an angle over the screen of a device, such as a phone or tablet, and trace along the sides of the angle with a fingertip or stylus. The app records the locations of the sides and then calculates the angle. For objects that may not fit on a screen, students can find measurements by rotating the device itself, which utilizes the built-in gyroscope sensor to measure the angle. It reports angle measurements in both degrees and radians. Watch a short YouTube video to see the Draw2Measure app in action. Draw2Measure is a free download from the Apple App Store and works with devices running iOS 8 or later. It cannot be downloaded directly from APH. Free on iTunes.

      eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.  

      Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

      Fleksy  - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

      GetThere free app for Android is designed specifically for blind and visually-impaired users. The app does not display a map, but tells the user where they are and how to get to their destination. Navigational guidance automatically talks to the user before and after every intersection. The user can ask GetThere to tell them where they are, simply by shaking their mobile device.

      KNFB Reader App for iOS recently released version 2.7.3 which now allows the user to take a picture by pressing the Volume Up button on their device and the Volume Down button to execute field of view.  Cost $99.99 from iTunes.

      Learning Ally Link for mobile is an educational reading app designed for learning through listening. Learning Ally provides more than 80,000 human-narrated audiobooks and audio textbooks for dyslexic, blind and visually impaired readers.  Free on iTunes.

      Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

      MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.

      Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

      overTHERE is a free, accessibility app that helps individuals who are blind explore and interact with the surrounding environment by using virtual audible signs.  Free from iTunes.

      Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.

      Prizmo Go- Instant Text Capture is a free, iOS app that allows the user to quickly capture printed text with the camera. Recognized and selected text can be read aloud. The app works with VoiceOver, provides spoken guidance prior to shooting and has text-to-speech capabilities for reading printed documents.  Free from iTunes.

      Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

      Seeing AI, developed by Microsoft, has been released to the Apple App Store. The app harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to open up the visual world and describe nearby people, text and objects. The app uses artificial intelligence and the camera on your iPhone to perform a number of useful functions: reading documents, identifying a product based on its barcode, recognizing people based on their face, providing a description, and recognizing images within other apps. Free from iTunes.

      Speech Central - Speech Central is an accessible Windows, Mac, Android and iOS app that lets the user listen to web content such as news, DAISY content and BookShare using synthesized speech.

      Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

      Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

      TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

      ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  

      VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

      VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

      vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

      VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

      VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

      Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes for $9.99.

      Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

      WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.
      .


      Braille Software Programs

      Career Information

      Eye Disorders

      Guide Dog Agencies

      Indiana O&M Specialists

      Indiana Websites

      National Organizations

      American Academy of Ophthalmology

      American Academy of Optometry

      Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps (TASH)

      American Council of the Blind

      American Diabetes Association

      American Foundation for the Blind

      American Optometric Association

      American Printing House for the Blind

      Assistive Technology Industry Association

      Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AERBVI)

      Association for Retinopathy of Prematurity and Related Diseases (ROP)

      Blind Babies Foundation

      Blind Children’s Center

      Bookshare.org

      Braille Authority of North America (BANA)

      Canadian National Institute for the Blind

      CAST (Center for Applied Special Technology)

      Center for Parent Information and Resources

      Closing the Gap

      Council for Exceptional Children

      Council of Citizens with Low Vision International

      Foundation Fighting Blindness (retinal diseases)

      Hadley School for the Blind

      Helen Keller National Center

      International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

      Learning Ally

      Lighthouse Guild

      National Association for Albinism and Hypopigmentation (NOAH)

      National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE)

      National Center on Deaf-Blindness

      National Center on Disability and Access to Education (NCDAE)

      National Eye Institute

      National Family Association for Deaf-Blind (NFADB)

      National Federation of the Blind

      National Industries for the Blind

      National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

      National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)

      National Organization of Parents of Blind Children

      National Resource Center for Blind Musicians, Music and Arts Center for Humanity

      Prevent Blindness America

      Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision at Mississippi State University

      United States Association for Blind Athletes

      United States Blind Golf Association

      United States Braille Chess Association

      Vision Council of America: Better Vision Institute 

      Parents and Families

      Product Catalogs

      Resources for Learning Braille

      Video Description Resources

      Vision Resources

      Access USA

      AEM (Accessible Educational Materials)

      American Journal of Ophthalmology 
      This site features a searchable database of abstracts from articles incurrent and past issues of the American Journal of Ophthalmology including topics about latest advances in ophthalmic surgical techniques or recent research findings.

      AppAdvice -AppAdvice is the ideal resource on the Web for people looking to discover iOS apps.

      AppleVis -AppleVis is a community-powered website for vision-impaired users of Apple's range of Mac computers, the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

      Best iPad Apps -List of iPad apps for teachers. Ranges from digital story telling to apps to teach creativity.

      Bill of Rights for All Children with Visual Impairments [ ENG ] [ SPAN ] YouTube video

      Blindness Resource Center

      Braille and Large Print Calendars

      Braille Bug

      Braille Help Electronic Mail List

      College Accessibility for Visually Impaired Students --Sponsored by Online Colleges

      Descriptive Video Service

      Disability Data Resource-InfoUse Project

      Guide to Braille Resources

      Guide to Visual Disabilities: How Colleges Help Visually Impaired Students Succeed

      Helping Students with Visual Disabilities: Resources, Tools and Technology to Foster School Success

      Louis Database

      Laser Eye Surgery Hub, UK -This site provides an international collection of online resources regarding blindness and low vision.

      Minimizing Vision Problems in College: A Student’s Guide to Eye Health and Wellness

      Money Readers

      Neuroscience for Kids, Vision

      NIMAC Database

      Paths to Literacy For students who are blind or visually impaired.

      Perkins Scout

      Physical Education (PE) Website at APH 

      Prevent Blindness 

      Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      Vision Associates

      Vision Impaired and Blindness Resources

       

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      News for Parents of Children Who are Blind or Have Low Vision

      Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network 

      Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network provides resources to connect with other parents, including a monthly parent newsletter with helpful tips and resources, as well as tele-support groups and presentations. Visit the Lighthouse Guild website to learn more.

      VO Lab


      VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

      Ballyland Magic App


      Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built in screen reader.  Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

      Storybud

      Storybud is an online story site, developed by a father with low vision so that he could interact with his children during bedtime story time. Storybud provides the online stories in various formats: audio only; a combined text and audio; or text on the screen only. The site is accessible for persons who are visually impaired using speech software. Visit www.storybud.org for more information.

      Center for Parent Information and Resources

      The Center for Parent Information and Resources has an updated fact sheet on children with visual impairment, including blindness. Visit http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/specific-disabilities/ to read more. 

      Learning Ally’s Website Adds Features for Parents


      Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization serving 300,000 children and adults across the U.S. who have visual, learning and reading-based disabilities, has transformed its website and launched new features and services to further benefit its members as well as parents and teachers. Parents can check out the more stremlined and user-friendly web site to access the organization's on-line library of more than 75,000 human-narrated audiobooks, including the world's largest library of audio textbooks. 

      VOICEtext, providing sentence-by-sentence highlighting of text on the screen in sync with audio narration. In its initial stages, this feature is being incorporated into a limited selection of titles in Learning Ally's library, will expand into more titles over time, and will benefit individuals for whom a multi-sensory approach to reading is recommended.

      Perkins Resources

      scout logo transThe Perkins School for the Blind have resources for parent, kids, and teacher that include fiction and non-fiction books and Internet resources. Read more at http://www.perkins.org/history/visit/research-library. Additional teacher resources are located at http://www.perkins.org/elearning.

      Perkins Scout is a searchable database of carefully evaluated online resources related to blindness and visual impairment. The website mascot, a·dog guide·named Scout, will help you retrieve the information you’re looking for; all of it has been reviewed by Perkins experts and organized for your convenience.·More information is available at http://www.perkinselearning.org/scout.

      Free Braille Books

      Seedlings Logo 7 11 newcolorsThrough the Seedlings Book Angel Program, visually-impaired children can receive two free braille books. Choose from print/braille/picture books, print/braille books, or braille only books. Register online at www.seedlings.org.


      Expanded Core Curriculum Resource

      The American Foundation for the Blind and the Perkins School for the Blind provide, a grassroots forum and a central resource and gateway to more information about the Expanded Core Curriculum

      WonderBaby


      WonderBaby.orgwb birds on text small, a project funded by Perkins School for the Blind, is dedicated to helping parents of young children with vision impairments as well as children with multiple disabilities. Much of the content on WonderBaby is provided by parents. They are not just passive observers or consumers of information; many site users comment on articles, answer questions in the Q&A forum, and share hyperlinks to net resources. Some submit original articles. It's in this sharing that WonderBaby earns much of its authenticity. These are real parents with real kids who are blind or visually disabled. They can empathize with other parents seeking answers. Having educated themselves, they feel compelled to give back so that fellow and future parents of children who are blind or visually disabled can also benefit from their experiences.

      Youth Transition Toolkit now available online from Talent Knows No Limits

      The "Youth Transition Toolkit: A Guide for Young People with Disabilities Transitioning to Adulthood" is now available online from Talent Knows No Limits (TKNL), a public information campaign of the California Health Incentives Improvement Project (CHIIP). Developed in partnership with young people, the toolkit is designed as a how-to guide on preparing for transition to adulthood and making choices about their own health care, education, employment, finances, independent living, and social and recreational activities. Some of the questions the toolkit helps youth address include:
      • What is Transition Planning? What is an IEP and how can I lead my IEP Meeting?
      • How can I manage my Social Security and medical benefits?
      • How does college differ from high school? How can I obtain services for my disability during college?
      • What resources are available to help me choose the right career?
      • Is there assistive technology available that can help me secure a job?
      • How can I find accessible housing to live on my own?
      • What should I do to prepare for a job interview?
      While some of the services and resources provided are California state-specific, much of the guidance is applicable to youth in any state. The toolkit was developed with funding from a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

      To learn more, visit the Youth Transition Toolkit website.

      Family Connect

      Do you want to connect with other parents of a blind or visually impaired child? Check out the American Foundation for the Blind’s “Family Connect” web site at http://www.familyconnect.org/parentsitehome.aspx. Information on numerous subjects of interest to parents, such as IEP’s, toys, eye care, etc. can also be found on this site.


      Braille Tales Free Print-Braille Children’s Book Program

      The American Printing House for the Blind is seeking applicants for its free print-braille children’s book program, Braille Tales. Braille Tales collaborates with the Dolly Parton Imagination Library and the Kentucky Correctional Institute to mail 6 print-braille books a year to families with a child and/or a parent with a visual impairment.

      Braille Tales is designed specifically for blind preschool children (age 0-5) and their families to foster early literacy and familiarity with braille. The program brings accessible, age-appropriate books into the homes of children who might not otherwise experience braille until they begin school.



      National Braille Press, Programs Promoting Braille Literacy

      pressHands On! Books for Blind Children is a series of programs for blind children that seek to provide braille books to thousands of blind children and their families throughout every stage of their learning and to provide advocacy and education promoting the benefits of braille. These programs include: Readbooks! Because Braille Matters Family Outreach Program, Bumpy Basics, Children's Braille Book Club, and Lifelong Literacy. Visit the NBP web page for more information about these children’s programs at http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/programs/index.html.

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      International Standard Book Numbers (ISBN)

      What Are They...and, Why Are They So Important?
      Since 2007, the ISBN has been a 13-digit number that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally. Previously, the ISBN was a ten-digit number.

      What is the purpose of an ISBN?
      The purpose of the ISBN is to establish and identify one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition, allowing for more efficient marketing of products by booksellers, libraries, universities, wholesalers and distributors.

      What are the unique characteristics of an ISBN?
      Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN. Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused. An ISBN is printed on the lower portion of the back cover of a book above the bar code and on the copyright page.

      Examples of formats which require a unique ISBN include:
      • Hardcover versions of textbooks
      • Paperbound versions of textbooks
      • Indiana Editions of textbooks
      • National Editions of textbooks
      • Teachers Editions of textbooks
      • Examination copies of textbooks (often shared with districts during district new adoption process)
      • Revised editions of textbooks
      • E-book format of textbooks that are purchased from publisher
      • Etc.
      Some ISBN's end in an "X," in which case enter the "X" into the search string

      Does the ISBN-13 have any meaning imbedded in the numbers?
      The five parts of an ISBN are as follows:
      1. The current ISBN-13 will be prefixed by "978"...usually
      2. Group or country identifier which identifies a national or geographic grouping of publishers
      3. Publisher identifier which identifies a particular publisher within a group
      4. Title identifier which identifies a particular title or edition of a title
      5. Check digit is the single digit at the end of the ISBN which validates the ISBN
      Tricks and Tips to Identifying the Correct ISBN!

      When searching for an ISBN, school-based staff often give the Digital Rights Manager (DRM) the ISBN of the teacher edition or an examination copy.· Both of these editions have a different ISBN number than the student textbook edition ISBN. The IERC requires the student edition ISBN number as all of books we transcribe, produce and provide are student editions.

      The following are TIPS to identifying the correct ISBN:
      • Ask the school-based staff to make a copy of the back cover of the Student Edition of the textbook or a copy of the copyright page.
      • Google the ISBN (the actual number, itself, without the hyphens).· You can also enter the number at www.gettextbooks.com to verify the correct edition and textbook information.
      IMPORTANT NOTE: Do NOT enter the hyphens of the ISBN when searching any database.

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      The IERC Braille Project

      Braille Project Computer Display
      Braille Project Tactile Graphics
      Braille Project Tiger Embosser

      The mission of the Braille Project is to provide high quality, well formatted braille instructional materials in a timely manner to Indiana’s school-age students who are blind or have low vision and whose assessed, primary reading medium is braille.

      Orders for braille instructional materials are submitted thru the ICAM. The IERC assigns transcripts to the Braille Project for instructional materials, currently not available in braille, as their capacity allows.


      The Braille Project utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcribers.

      Read more

      The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)

      Miami Logo

      The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) was established in May of 2008 thru the collaborative efforts of the Indiana Department of Corrections, the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired/Indiana Educational Resource Center and the Indiana Department of Education. It is the goal of the project to provide quality braille, large print, and accessible instructional materials to students who are blind or have low vision in Indiana’s local schools, in a timely and efficient manner, while providing a skill to the offenders that will increase employment opportunities thus reducing recidivism.

      MAMP produces and transcribe books from National Instructional Material Accessible Standard (NIMAS) formatted publisher files whenever possible. NIMAS files are electronic publisher files that have been formatted or tagged in a universal format to assist accessible format textbook producers in producing accessible specialized formats in a timely manner. By utilizing NIMAS files, textbooks no longer need to be scanned in or input manually. This significantly speeds up the process of producing braille, large print and digitally rendered textbooks. However, the ICAM can only access NIMAS files from the national repository, the National Instructional Materials Center (NIMAC), if the schools require the publishers per their textbook contracts to send them down to the NIMAC. Be sure to include this contractual language when purchasing textbooks from the publisher to insure that the appropriate files can be secured for production and transcription, especially for core instructional materials not on the state adoption lists. See an example of this contractual language.

      Print copies of the textbooks are still required for production and transcription, along with the NIMAS file, to insure that all text, images, and image descriptions are included and placed in the correct sequence.

      MAMP utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcription.

      Miami01
      Miami02
      Miami03

      MAMPStaffPicture2016

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      IERC Federal Quota Annual Census/Registration of Legally Blind Students

      The IERC administers the Federal Quota dollars for the State of Indiana through the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) and registers all eligible legally blind students, public and private, with APH.

      Each year during the month of January, Authorized Officials or their Designees are asked to participate in the "Annual Census of Students Who Are Legally Blind". The purpose of the registration is to enroll eligible students who meet the legal definition of blindness to generate Federal Quota dollars.

      In order for the State of Indiana to participate in the Federal "Act to Promote the Education of the Blind", the registration status of all students who are legally blind is reviewed annually. The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) administers the federal quota allocation for all states, including Indiana. Funds are appropriated by Congress to APH for the production of specialized instructional materials to be used by students who are legally blind. The appropriated amount is then divided into separate accounts within each state according to the number of students who are legally blind reported in an annual registration. Students must be legally blind, enrolled in educational programs below the college level and have a parental consent form, in English  or  Spanish , on file in order to be eligible for inclusion on the list sent by the IERC to APH. For additional information regarding the parental consent process, read our consent to release student information talking points as well a short FAQ document.

      Schools or agencies may order items available from APH federal quota allocation equal to the funds generated by the number of students who are legally blind registered by them each year. So long as funds are available within a given year, the IERC will honor any reasonable and legitimate request for APH material that is approved by the designated contact person. Items ordered with APH federal quota funds must originally be used by students who are legally blind and generated the dollars. Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.

      For more information regarding the federal quota, visit: APH Federal Quota Overview

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      IERC (Indiana Educational Resource Center)

      Student using a Braille Notetaker

      Student using a Braille Notetaker

      Student reading a braille book

      Student reading a braille book

      Student using a Digital Player/Recorder

      Student using a Digital Player/Recorder


      • The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) is a statewide, centralized depository of specialized formats for school-age students who are blind or visually impaired enrolled in local education agencies. These formats include braille and large print instructional materials, as well as tangible aids and equipment specifically designed for use by students with visual impairments.

        The IERC collaborates with the PATINS Project, Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM) for the provision of services. Request for instructional materials, for school-age students who are blind or have low vision, are submitted to the ICAM by the LEA appointed Digital Right’s Managers (DRM) and are processed by the IERC. All materials are provided at no cost to eligible students and are on loan to the ordering local education agencies.

        In addition to the centralized, statewide depository, the IERC also houses and manages a Braille Transcription Project and oversees the Miami Accessible Media Project located at the Miami Correctional Facility in Bunker Hill, Indiana.

        Indiana Education Resource Center Brochure

      • IERC Protocol for COVID-19 Mail Handling and Cleaning

        ICAM Textbook Ordering

        Please keep the orders coming in for next school year so we have as much time as possible for production of large print and braille instructional materials. When ordering, please confirm that the schools will be open to receive materials at that location over the summer. Given our current situation, BLV teachers/consultants can continue to choose to have textbooks shipped to their home address as we have done for the last few months. Please provide Martha LaBounty in our office with your home location information so she can update that in our system when placing orders.

        A reminder…If you search the ICAM for an item and your results are unsuccessful, you may place a Special Request for that item. To place a special request, log in to the ICAM. On the main page, select Special Request and enter data or after you have searched the ICAM with the ISBN or APH catalog number, you will also have the option to place a “Special Request.”

        IERC Material Returns

        We are getting books and equipment returns coming in from the 2019-2020 school year.  Thank you for making the effort to gather up materials from schools and student homes and returning them to the IERC so we can get them cleaned up, checked back in and recirculated! We understand that this has been an unusual time for all of us, and some of you may not be able to gather up materials at this time but we appreciate your time and effort getting this completed when you can.

        Be sure to return any Perkins SmartBraillers and MATT Connects per the loan agreement.  Also, any professional publications need to be returned as well.  

        Due to the current COVID-19 situation, it would be preferable to return materials via mail service so we can follow our mail handling protocol to store incoming materials for 24 hours prior to opening boxes. However, for those who prefer to hand deliver returns to the IERC, please call ahead and schedule a time for your delivery. We will be practicing proper social distancing protocol. 

        We do ask to please clean all materials before returning to the IERC.  IERC staff will also be performing an additional deep cleaning of materials prior to putting them on our shelves or recirculating the materials.To view our mail handling protocol, please visit our webpage.

        When returning materials to the IERC, please visit our webpage to access return Free Matter for the Blind mailing labels. Please be sure to complete the return address as this helps us sort incoming materials that come off the mail truck. We would appreciate you notifying us of any discrepancies in your shipments using the Inventory Return Forms. This would include missing or damaged volumes or missing or damaged parts of returned kits.

        Annual Inventory Recall Process

        Information regarding the Annual Inventory Recall Process has been sent out to all BLV’s. We appreciate those teachers who have been updating their information. If you know you will be renewing or reassigning instructional materials or specialized equipment for your students, we would appreciate you logging into the ICAM and updating that information. That will let us know which copies of materials will not be available for loan from our collection and help us project production needs.

        IERC Shipment Confirmation

        A packing slip will be enclosed in each shipment the IERC sends out this summer.

        Visit the IERC webpage for step-by-step instructions at http://www.patinsproject.com/ierc-policies-and-procedures/packing-slip-delivery-confirmation

        Summer Opportunities for Students with Visual Impairments

        NFB Bell Academy

        The Bell Academy will be free to all participants this year.  NFB is providing all materials needed.  They will be shipped to participants homes prior to their chosen session. Kids will still have time with a licensed TVI every day and they will meet with their peers via Zoom. 

        NFB Bell Dates:

        June 1, 2020 through June 12, 2020

        June 22, 2020 through July 3, 2020

        July 27, 2020 through August 7, 2020

        A Spanish session will be offered during the June 22-July 3, 2020 session.

        If you or any parents you share this information with have any questions, please contact Kimberly Banks at 404-259-2641. To view the registration page, visit the NFB BELL Academy website.

        Virtual ExCEL Camp

        The inaugural Virtual ExCEL Camp will be held from mid-June through mid-August and will include a live hour at 2:00 ET, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and is free to all registrants. The target audience will continue to be for students. Also included are five at-home extension activities for the camp theme. Virtual ExCEL Camp will be separated by age/grade groups. Because students are not always able to attend during the scheduled hour, the sessions will be recorded. Please register your students with their needs and levels in mind. Students will receive a camp shirt and other APH goodies. To learn more and to register, visit the APH Virtual ExCEL Camp webpage.

        Project Inspire

        Project INSPIRE will offer two courses online this summer.

        • Pre-Kindergarten – 1st Grade Students: Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts and Strategies for Supporting the Student in Building Math Skills.
        • An Introduction to Nemeth Code Symbols Used in Grades 2 to 5 and Strategies for Supporting Elementary Students in Building Math Skills.

        Check the Project INSPIRE’s website for updates or follow on Facebook.

        Additional Resources

        The National Center on Accessible Educational Materials has created a webpage dedicated to eLearning and Accessible Materials for All Students. This information may be shared with classroom teachers and other staff to assist in the creation of accessible digital materials.

        Make sure your students are enrolled in Bookshare and/or Learning Ally as well as the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Materials (BARD) and that they have access to these accounts from home. These free reading tools will help your students continue to access information and participate in learning.

        IERC Summer Hours

        The IERC will resume full staffing and hours as of June 1, 2020. Our office will be open from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm each day. If you have questions or need assistance please call our office at 317-554-2740 or 1-800-833-2198 or email us at ierc@isbvik12.org.

        Have a wonderful summer!



      • Hours of Operation: 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. EST

        Mail:
        Indiana Educational Resource Center
        7725 North College Avenue
        Indianapolis, IN 46240-2504

        Phone: (317) 554-2740
        Toll-free: (800) 833-2198
        Fax: (317) 475-9181

        eMail:
        IERCEmail@isbvik12.org
      • Upcoming BLV Trainings

        Check back soon!

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      Frequently Asked Questions

      When should braille and large print instructional materials be ordered?

      All textbook orders for the upcoming school year should be ordered by April 15 of the current school year if possible.  Order all textbooks titles you know that the student will require.  It takes a minimum of 4 months for new braille transcriptions and 3 months for production of large print/accessible files, sometimes longer during the summer peak order season.

      Is there a cost to borrow materials from the IERC?

      LEA's do not have to pay for the materials received from the IERC.  Materials are provided through Federal Quota dollars and Part B discretionary funds and are on loan to the LEA's.  All items are tracked and LEA's are accountable for the return of materials to the IERC when the student has finished using them. 

      Why do you need the ISBN number on textbook orders?

      The ISBN or International Standard Book Number is a unique 13-digit number that identifies one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition.  Prior to 2007, it was a ten-digit number.  Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN.  Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused.  This number helps the IERC pin-point the exact textbook information.  Read more about ISBN numbers here.

      Sometimes classroom teachers provide the wrong textbook information to me and I order the wrong large print or braille book. If the IERC provides the book I have ordered, but it is the wrong title or edition, will they provide a second, corrected copy?

      Only if we have it in our collection, ready to loan.  We will not purchase a second copy as these items are very costly.  It is the responsibility of the LEA to insure the accuracy of the order information prior to placing the order the first time.  The IERC will provide the LEA with commercial sources where they can purchase the materials directly if needed.

      Does the IERC supply magnifiers, CCTV's or other non-APH materials?

      No.  The LEA's will need to purchase these materials directly from the commercial vendors.  The LEA's may want to contact the PATINS Project Lending Library for product information or possible equipment loan. http://www.patinsproject.org/

      May DRM's order more that one copy of a braille or large print textbook for a student?

      The IERC will provide one set of textbooks in braille or large print.  It is the LEA's responsibility to provide a second copy if it has been documented as a need on the student's individualized education plan.  The IERC's role is to assist the LEA's in the provision of accessible instructional materials.

      Are the materials ordered with federal quota dollars generated by my students the property of the school or do the materials need to be returned to the IERC?

      Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.  It is the responsibility of the state's Ex Officio (IERC Director) to oversee the federal account, which includes the distribution, tracking, and re-loan of educational materials purchased with quota dollars.  All federal quota dollars as well as materials purchased with those dollars must be accounted for.

      May the student consume braille and large print workbooks?

      Workbooks or consumable textbooks ONLY may be consumed if needed.  If materials are consumed, they must be accounted for during the annual inventory recall process as consumed so we can update our inventory accordingly.

      If my student moves in-state, but to another LEA, can I send his/her materials with them or do they need to be returned to the IERC?

      All materials loaned to an LEA for use by a specific student must be returned to the IERC if the student moves to a different school corporation.  It will be the responsibility of the DRM from the new school corporation to update the student information on the ICAM and to order materials required for use by the student enrolled in the new LEA. 

      If borrowed braille and large print textbooks and specialized aids and equipment are not accounted for or returned to the IERC at the end of each school year, will the ordering district be charged for their replacement?

      The local education agency is ultimately responsible for tracking and accounting for all ordered instructional materials purchased with state and federal dollars and loaned to them by the IERC at the end of each school year.  The IERC reserves the right to charge the ordering local education agency for lost or unaccounted braille and large print books as well as specialized aids and equipment.  For books with multiple volumes, the school district would be charged for the cost to replace the entire book, if the IERC cannot replace individual volumes.

      Why do I need to send two print copies of a textbook for production of transcription?

      If textbooks ordered are not available in large print or braille, two original copies will be requested by the IERC for production or transcription from the LEA.  One copy is torn apart during the production process and kept on site with the master and the second copy, used for proofreading, is returned to the school after production or transcription is complete.  It is the responsibility of the local education agency to provide the requested print copies of the textbooks, not the IERC or the MAMP.  The local education agency can choose not to send print copies to the IERC for production or transcription and can purchase directly from commercial sources if available. 

      Why did the IERC send out a braille copy of the national edition of a book when the state edition was ordered?

      In order to keep costs down and to prevent the transcription of a braille book already available, the IERC reserves the right to substitute the national edition of an ordered state edition if the publisher verifies that the national edition is classroom compatible with the state edition. 

      Will the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) produce accessible versions of any textbook?

      No.  Only accessible derivative versions, as a result of the production of the hard copy large print or transcription of a braille textbook, will be made available in accessible formats as determined appropriate by the MAMP.  Any accessible formats produced by the MAMP will appear in the ICAM during a search if the student has qualified for these specialized formats per their IEP.

      May large print and braille instructional materials be ordered directly from the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)?

      No.  All orders for large print and braille instructional materials must go through the ICAM via the appointed DRM and then to the IERC for review and processing. All orders sent to MAMP originate from the IERC.

      Will the IERC enlarge or transcribe ISTEP preparatory materials?

      The Indiana Educational Resource Center is unable to provide braille or large print copies of ISTEP preparatory materials.  The IERC has been instructed by the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) assessment office that we cannot produce ISTEP materials (even if it is part of a publisher bundle) into an alternate format because these materials are not endorsed by the IDOE. Therefore, because they are not endorsed by the state, we cannot expend our federal Part B dollars to produce alternate formats for our students.  In addition, the material contained in these items, per IDOE, may actually violate the Indiana State Board of Education's Ethical Testing Practices and Procedures.  School corporations are encouraged to use the endorsed ISTEP materials and assessment.

      Will the IERC provide textbooks of a religious nature for a students being served in parentally placed, non-public schools?

      No.  Per the Indiana State Code, we cannot expend federal dollars on the purchase or production of religious curriculum materials for use by students in parentally-placed, non-public schools, including those books from religious publishers. However, if the book is used as part of the local education agency curriculum and has been endorsed by the local education agency, we can provide those titles.

      Does the IERC provide older copyrights or editions of braille and large print textbooks?

      The IERC reserves the right, dependent on funding, to not purchase older copyrights or editions of specialized braille and large print instructional materials.  If the LEA requests an older copyright of a textbook in braille or large print, and the IERC is unable to purchase, the IERC will assist the LEA by researching available commercial vendors for procurement at the local level.  Furthermore, if an LEA writes into a student's individualized education program (IEP) that braille and/or large print textbooks will be provided for a student, it shall not be the ultimate responsibility of the IERC to provide the braille and/or large print textbooks and materials.

      Will the IERC replace braille and large print instructional materials lost by districts?

      Due to limited funds, the IERC cannot replace specialized instructional materials that have been purchased/shipped by the IERC and received at the LEA, then lost or misplaced at the local level.

      Read more

      IERC Staff

      NamePositionPhone
      Leslie Durst IERC Director800-833-2198
      317-554-2740
      Martha LaBounty IERC Librarian800-833-2198
      317-554-2740
      Betsy Scott IERC Braille Project Manager800-833-2198
      317-554-2740
      Robert Eutz Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)800-833-2198
      317-554-2740
      Nonna Cortez Braille Transcriber800-833-2198
      317-554-2740
      Eric Kindler IERC Orders and Materials Specialist800-833-2198
      317-554-2740

      Read more

      Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline

      Unified English Braille

      Timeline for Implementation in Indiana

      Compiled by Indiana UEB Implementation Committee

      August 21, 2014; Revised April 13, 2015; November 16, 2015

      Unified English Braille Code

      In November 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while continuing the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html.

      BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB). This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. For more information visit the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/pressreleases/pr-2013-11-26.html.

      Indiana Statewide UEB Transition

      Indiana has been actively working on the transition to UEB. A statewide stakeholders committee met in 2014 and 2015, and will continue to meet ongoing to further develop/refine Indiana’s state plan for UEB implementation and to guide the transition. The UEB Implementation Committee consists of representatives from the Statewide Resource Center, State AT Project, University Training Programs, Adult Services, Residential School and Outreach Staff, TBLV’s from around the state, Prison Braille Program, Braille Transcribers, and the Indiana Department of Education.

      The Indiana UEB state plan was submitted to and approved by the Indiana Department of Education in September 2014. To date: transcribers have trained in the UEB and received their Canadian UEB certification. They are currently seeking U.S. national UEB certification; university programs have implemented UEB coursework for their teacher training programs; and workshops, conferences and webinars have and will be conducted for BLV teaching and paraprofessional staff.

      Considerations for Math Code

      UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

      As a default, requests for instructional materials for subjects that require math code (i.e., science and mathematics), for all grades, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for mathematics.  UEB will be provided in lieu of Nemeth Code only if the student’s IEP dictates UEB for math instruction.  The Case Conference Committee (CCC) must determine if UEB or UEB with Nemeth better meets the instructional needs of the student.

      When it is determined that braille is a consideration for the student who is blind, then the code for the instruction of math/technical subjects (Nemeth or UEB) will need to be specified and a written justification provided.

      To view “Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code” developed by the UEB Implementation Sub-Committee, click here

      Timeline

      The transition to UEB from EBAE in Indiana will be a six year plan, based on a school year calendar.  It began with the 2013-2014 SY and will run through the 2018-2019 SY.  Full implementation of the UEB (i.e. instruction, materials, assessment) is targeted for the 2018-2019 SY.

      Each local education agency (LEA), based on the approved state timeline, will be responsible for developing a plan for implementation of the UEB at the local level to meet the full implementation UEB date. The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) will work closely with LEA’s to best meet the educational braille needs of individual students.

      Implementation of this timeline involves the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available.

      Timeline Breakdown

      2013-2014 SY

      • Transcriber training.

      • Research and begin drafting state plan.

         

      2014-2015 SY

      • Transcriber training and certification.

      • Approval of a state plan for UEB implementation.

      • Statewide UEB professional development for BLV teacher and paraprofessional staff (workshops, conferences, braille training, webinars and UEB resources).

      • January 2015

        • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2015-2016 school year, for Grades K-5.

        • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

        • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

        • Spring 2015

      IDOE provides state assessments in EBAE/Nemeth.

      2015-2016 SY

      • September 2015

      Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in Grades K-5.  Begin using available UEB materials.

      • January 2016

        • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2016-2017 school year, for all grades.

        • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

        • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

        • Spring 2016

          IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth as well as EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 3-5 and EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 6 and up.

      2016-2017 SY

      • September 2016

      Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in grades 6 and up. Begin using available UEB materials.

      • January 2017

        • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

        • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

        • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

        • Spring 2017

          IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

      2017-2018 SY

      • September 2017

        Continue UEB instruction as needed for remaining students, move in and transfer students.

      • January 2018

        • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

        • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

        • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

        • Spring 2018

      IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

      2018-2019

      • Complete UEB transition. All school-age materials will be produced in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth.  All students who read braille will be expected to access material produced in UEB.

      • Based on availability of UEB, existing materials transcribed in EBAE may continue to be provided.

        • Spring 2019

      IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

      UEB Trainings and Learning Opportunities

      Training will be provided by the PASS (Promoting Achievement for Students with Sensory Loss) Project, Blumberg Center, Indiana State University in collaboration with the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) and the PATINS (Promoting Achievement Through Technology and Instruction for all Student) Project, through 2015. Additional trainings after 2015 will be provided as needed.

      • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille (Fall 2014)

      UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille was intended to educate and prepare teachers and staff in order to facilitate a smooth transition from EBAE to UEB.  Six regional trainings provided a comparison of English Braille American Edition (EBAE) and UEB.  Teachers and staff participated in hands-on exercises specific to UEB.

      • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille Webinar (Fall 2014)

      A webinar was developed as a resource and for those unable to attend the regional trainings.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:http://dgmpresentations.pbworks.com/w/page/90921945/UEB%20Intro%20Videos

      • UEB Ready? ListServ (Fall 2014)

      An e-mail discussion listserv has been created to provide a communication tool for teachers and staff to ask questions, share resources and strategies, and discuss important issues specific to the implementation of Unified English Braille (UEB).  Transcribers, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals working with students who utilize braille as their literacy mode are participating in this forum.

      • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Directors of Special Education (Fall 2014)

      A webinar was developed to address questions and concerns specific to Directors of Special Education in Indiana regarding the transition to UEB.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:

      https://tegr.it/y/1hqfn

      • UEB Ready?  A Supported Independent Study (Spring 2015 & Summer 2015)

      The PASS Project in conjunction with Indiana State University offered a 13-week training program via distance education utilizing Blackboard.  Participants in the program are using Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille (API-UEB) as a guide to learning UEB.  Throughout the program, instructors answered questions and provided feedback on quizzes prior to the final exam.

      • UEB Ready? Teaching the Technology (Spring 2015)

      This training provided an opportunity for vendors to share information about technology that supports Unified English Braille (UEB).  Participants were presented with the capabilities of various devices and how to utilize these devices with students thereby allowing teachers to make informed recommendations on the device(s) that will best meet the needs of students. This training was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.  Students and their parents are encouraged to attend.

      • UEB Ready? Teaching the Software (Spring 2015)

      In this training, participants learned how to utilize the Duxbury Braille Translation software to become more efficient in their ability to transcribe and produce needed braille instructional materials in UEB.  It was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.

      • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Parents (Fall 2015)

      A webinar was developed with parents in mind directly addressing their questions or concerns regarding the transition to UEB. To access the webinar, follow the link below: http://bit.ly/uebparentwebinar

      • UEB Ready? Teaching the Transition (Fall 2015)

      This training provided strategies and resources to assist Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision when teaching the transition from EBAE to UEB.

      Resources

      The IERC website will post UEB information, resources, and updates. UEB information can be found at the IERC website or by visiting the BANA website:


      UEB Implementation Committee Members

      Leslie Durst, Facilitator - Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center 

      Katie Crawford - BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools 

      Rhoda Davis - Braille Instructor, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      Jim Durst - Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired 

      Robert Eutz - Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP), Miami Correctional Facility

      Martha LaBounty - Database Librarian, Indiana Educational Resource Center

      Jeanne Lee - BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

      Matt Maurer – Professor, Butler University 

      Bill Powell - BOSMA Enterprises

      Daniel McNulty - Director, PATINS Project

      Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

      Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

      Carol Wetherell - Director, Indiana State University, Blumberg Center

      Kristan Sievers-Coffer - Special Education Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

      Karen Stein - Special Programs Assessment Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

      Marcee Wilburn - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

      Jay Wilson - Principal, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      UEB Implementation Sub-Committee Members

      Marcee Wilburn, Facilitator - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

      Lynda Blaising – BLV Consultant, Northeast Indiana Special Education Cooperative

      Katie Crawford – BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools

      Jim Durst –Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      Leslie Durst – Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center

      Nanette Galloway – BLV Consultant, Elkhart County Special Education Cooperative

      Alessandra Kester – BLV HS Life Skills Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      Jeanne Lee – BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

      Shelby Metzler – BLV Consultant, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

      Rhonda Rhoades – BLV Consultant, North Central Indiana Special Education Cooperative

      Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

      Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

      Lisa Starrfield – BLV Mathematics Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

      Read more

      App List

      AbleRoad iOS App is a free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairments. Requires iOS 5.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

      Access Together, is an app designed to help people with disabilities locate accessible restaurants, shops and other venues in their communities. For more information, visit: http://www.accesstogether.org/.

      AccessNote, an iOS notetaking app for the classroom from the American Foundation for the Blind, is available from the iTunes App store. Cost: $19.99. The app requires iOS 7.1 or later and is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information visit iTunes

      Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

      AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.


      Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built-in screen reader. Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

      BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download)
      which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at 
      https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.


      Better Vision All-in-One Reading App is a mobile app for iOS and Android devices that magnifies text, provides contrast and color filters to improve clarity, and can read text aloud. The Zoom-in Magnification enlarges text and images from 2x to 10x; the reading lamp works on mobile devices that have a built-in light function; the text-to-speech reads text aloud in four languages (English, German, Dutch, and Spanish); and the Contrast Enhancing Filters allow the choice of six color scheme settings, including high contrast white on black. Cost: $5.99 from the app store or on Play Google. For more information, click here.

      Braille Driller- An app for people who want learn the Braille alphabet.  Includes a review of the Braille alphabet and four activities of increasing difficulty. For use on the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

      Braille Now - An app designed to teach sighted persons how to recognize the Braille letters a-z. For use on iPad. $0.99 from iTunes.

      Braille Sonar - This app allows for the lookup of Contracted Braille symbols, somb basic computer braille symbols and Nemeth Code.  Free from iTunes.  Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

      Color ID Free - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.  For use on iPad, iPod Touch(fourth generation and newer), iPad 2 and Android. Free from iTunes.

      Color Identifier - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.$4.99 from iTunes.

      Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

      Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

      Disney Movies Anywhere App - Every Pixar film is now available with Mobile Audio Description from Disney using the Disney Movies Anywhere app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/disney-movies-anywhere-watch/id766894692?mt=8

      DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

      Dragon Dictation - Dictate message and Dragon types it out on the screen.  Options include text message, email, copy-and-past, Facebook, and Twitter.  Works on iPad, iPhone, and on second and third generation iPod Touch (external microphone required).  Free from iTunes

      eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.

      Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

      EyeHope Magnifier - Turns iPhone into a powerful magnifier (1-100x magnification). Four high-contrast modes for low vision users. For use with iPhone or iPod Touch. $.99 from iTunes.

      Fleksy - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

      Learning Ally Audio - Learning Ally members to download DAISY audio Learning Ally titles from onto iOS devices, i.e. iPad, iPhone and iPod. Membership is required.  The app is free from iTunes.

      Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

      LookTel Money Reader - Identifies type of bills using the iPhone or iPod Touch.  $9.99 from iTunes.

      LookTel VoiceOver Tutorial App - Learn and Practice the Basic Gestures used with VoiceOver and iOS.  For more information visit Applevis.  App is free from iTunes.  

      MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.  http://mpaja.com/frontpage/MBraille

      Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

      Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.


      Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

      Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

      Talking Timer- Designed as an aid in exercise—found useful in kitchen.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $0.99 from iTunes.

      Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

      TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

      ThirdEye Technologies Inc. - ThirdEye restores autonomy to visually impaired persons' lives by enabling them to recognize everyday objects.  Users touch on button and the technology verbally returns back whatever object the user is looking at within seconds (for example a "5 US Dollar Bill" or an "Ibuprofen bottle").  App is free from iTunes.

      ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  


      Timely-Time Teller iOS app will announce the time at regular intervals and at specific recurring times. Timely-Time Teller requires iOS 6.0 or later, is compatible with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.  It is available for $2.99 from the iTunes App Store

      VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

      VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

      vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

      ViA - Visually Impaired Apps. A Free app from Braille Institute of America for the iPhone or iPad to assist blind and low-vision users to easily sort through the 500,000+ apps in the iTunes App Store to locate the apps that were built specifically for visually impaired users.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  Free from iTunes.

      VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

      Voice Brief - Reads emails, twitter, etc aloud.  Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $2.99 from iTunes.

      Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes App Store for $9.99.

      Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

      WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.

      ZoomReader - Optical Character Recognition allows user text-to-speech on books or menus.  $19.99 on iTunes.

      Read more

      IERC Indiana UEB Position Statement

      UEB Transition and Implementation in Indiana

      Indiana Educational Resource Center/ICAM
      Position Statement for the Provision of Materials

      The Braille Authority of North America (BANA) is the official governing body for braille in the United States. In November 2012, BANA voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while maintaining the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The UEB will replace the English Braille American Edition (EBAE). The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html. BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB).

      UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

      Textbooks and other instructional materials for students who are blind or have low vision will be provided by the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) via the Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM), per the approved UEB Timeline for Implementation in Indiana, and as indicated below:

      •Requests for instructional materials in subjects using literary braille (i.e., social studies and language arts), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2015-16 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades, in subjects using literary braille, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB for the 2016-2017 school year.

      •Requests for instructional materials in subjects that require math (i.e., science and mathematics), not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth for the 2015-2016 school year for Grades K-5. Requests for all grades in technical subjects, not previously transcribed in EBAE, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for the 2016-2017 school year. UEB Technical Code will be provided in lieu of UEB with Nemeth Code if the student’s IEP dictates UEB math. BANA’s “Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts” will be followed for UEB with Nemeth Code transcription.

      •Instructional materials previously transcribed in EBAE will continue to be made available. The IERC will not convert and produce existing braille files from EBAE into UEB as a policy. The transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC. Students who have been taught EBAE may continue to receive materials originally produced in the EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students, just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

      •The provision of textbooks and instructional materials in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code will be dependent on the availability and capacity of certified transcribers.

      The IERC is committed to providing access to instructional materials in braille for students who are blind or have low vision, per their IEP, and will continue to work together with schools towards a smooth transition to the UEB.

      Transition will be a gradual process over the next few of years. Implementation will involve the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available. Indiana is anticipating full implementation for the 2018-2019 school year.

      Read more

      IERC Practice

      AbleRoad iOS App is a  free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairements.  The app is designed for both iPhone and iPad. For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

      Read more

      IERC Annual Calendar

      First Monday in January
      • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind begins on the first Monday in January. 
      February 15
      • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind is completed on the ICAM by IERC appointed Designees.
      • Process for submitting braille orders on the ICAM to the IERC for the next school year begins.
      March 15
      • Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration Report is submitted to the American Printing House for the Blind by the IERC.
      • Annual IERC Inventory Recall/Reallocation process begins on the ICAM.
      May 1
      • Material requests for the next school year are due to be submitted on the ICAM.
      May 15
      • Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation process ends.
      June 15
      • Materials currently on loan, that have not been renewed or retained during the Annual Inventory Recall/Reallocation, are due back at the IERC.
      July 15
      • IERC begins shipping materials ordered on the ICAM to the schools. 
      October 1
      • Federal Quota allocation is appropriated to the American Printing House for the Blind. The allocation is made available to the IERC/Indiana Department of Education.
      December 15
      • School Corporations begin to prepare for the Annual Census/Federal Quota Registration of Students who are Legally Blind.

      Read more

      Unified English Braille Code (UEB)

      On November 2, 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) passed the motion to officially adopt the Unified English Braille code or UEB in the United States. In November 2013, BANA affirmed January 4, 2016 as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of the UEB. This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. The forum involved 48 delegates representing 31 organizations from the braille community. Read more here.

      The IERC has been preparing for the rollout of UEB since 2012. Our braille transcribers have trained and received certification in the new code and have actively been transcribing instructional materials in UEB. The IERC has worked closely with the Indiana State University Blumberg Center, PASS Project, to develop and conduct training for teachers and paraprofessionals who will be responsible for instructing our braille readers in the new code. Student instruction has begun for all grades and the IERC is transcribing all new requests in UEB and UEB/Nemeth.

      Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline Webpage     PDF
      Indiana UEB Position Statement Webpage     PDF
      Indiana Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code PDF
      UEB and Nemeth Code Power Point  PDF 

      Considerations for States Providing Materials in Braille, NCEO Webpage

      Duxbury

      Using Duxbury Software to Create Braille Documents Webinar 2017 Pass Project

      https://my.yuja.com/V/Video?v=81219&node=252679&a=1991009257&autoplay=1

      Using Word and Duxbury to Create Braille Documents: PowerPoint Presentations and Handouts

      Duxbury BANA Template Part I
      Duxbury BANA Template Part II

      Part II Handouts
           Example 1 Paragraphs
           Example 2 Lists
           Example 3 Directions with Exercise Sentences
           Example 4 Multiple Choice

      Student Instruction Programs

      Mangold Braille Program, Basic Braille

      This program consists of a variety of components. Unit 1 Tracking and Unit 2 Alphabet Program Kit will help beginning braille readers of all ages by providing a solid foundation on which to build future reading skills. For young, beginning braille learners, rapid finger movement is fostered, and finger movements that are counterproductive are discouraged. This program will also help experienced readers who demonstrate scrubbing, backtracking, and braille letter or number reversal errors. Adults who have experienced recent vision loss will also benefit from this program. The first fifteen lessons of this program develop tactile discrimination, proper hand position, and rapid tracking. The last fifteen lessons systematically introduce the letters of the alphabet. Each lesson includes criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, and more. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet.

      Unit 3: UEB Contractions, Part A-E, was written for new readers who already know the braille alphabet and is divided into five parts so that teachers are better able to tailor the program to individual student needs. The parts are designed to be taught in order, but a student can skip a part if the teacher of the visually impaired has determined that the student has already mastered the contractions taught in that part. Unit 3: UEB Contractions is designed to help teachers of the visually impaired teach reading skills while teaching the braille code. All of the parts in Unit 3 are controlled for contractions and contain both reading and writing exercises. Common words and contractions, that beginning readers encounter, are introduced early in the program to help facilitate early reading. Punctuation and common math symbols are also introduced. The reading exercises include repeated readings, sentence tracking, multiple choice questions and clue activities. The writing exercises include sentence copying, sentence starters and open-ended questions.

      Mangold Nemeth Code Number Recognition Program Kit was designed for students who are ready to learn the letters of the alphabet and are also ready to learn Nemeth numerals. This program introduces the braille numerals 0-9 and teaches rapid and accurate braille numeral recognition. The program is designed to avoid reversal errors. It provides practice in tracking numbers horizontally and vertically. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet. The student workbook contains criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, sample number lines, and more.

      Mangold UEB Number Recognition Program Kit introduces the UEB braille numerals 0-9 and teaches rapid and accurate braille numeral recognition. The program is designed to avoid reversal errors. It provides practice in tracking numbers horizontally and vertically. The print teacher's manual includes step-by-step instructions and print replicas of each braille worksheet. The student workbook contains criterion tests, braille worksheets, games, sample number lines, and more.

      Building on Patterns (BOP)


      Building on Patterns (BOP) is a complete primary literacy program designed to teach beginning braille users all language arts – reading, writing, and spelling. The BOP series addresses phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and oral vocabulary. It is currently being updated for the UEB. Available from the American Printing House for the Blind.www.aph.org.

      BRAILLE TOO: THE NEXT GENERATION

      The long-awaited revision of the 1994 Braille Too curriculum is here! Like BRL2 Publishing’s previous products, it will be available exclusively in digital format on a USB drive, which will allow an individual teacher to print/emboss whatever copies they need for themselves and their students.

      Braille Too: The Next Generation retains the format and some of the content of the original curriculum but has changed and added content, which has been reorganized from 10 units in the original to 11 units in Braille Too: The Next Generation in order to accommodate the many symbols added in Unified English Braille. The teacher’s edition (available in either print or braille) contains over 1,000 pages, with over 600 pages of student braille reading exercises and 200 pages of large print writing exercises. Braille student and teacher editions are provided in both Duxbury and BRF formats so they can either be embossed or used on a refreshable braille device.

      An introductory price of $400 for the complete curriculum with print teacher’s edition ($500 with braille teacher’s edition) is guaranteed through the end of 2017. Shipping is currently $2.67 for up to 4 USB drives in the same mailer (shipping rates subject to change by the USPS). Purchase orders can be e-mailed to info@brl2.com; checks or money orders can be mailed to the address below. (No credit cards accepted at this time.)
      For shipping rates on more than 4 copies, rates on insurance (which is optional), or other information regarding Braille Too: The Next Generation, please contact BRL2 Publishing at info@brl2.com or call 801-572-5427.

      BRL2 Publishing
      11647 S 2220 E
      Sandy, UT 84092

      Braille FUNdamentals

      Braille FUNdamentals is a comprehensive program for teaching the Braille code. It is currently being revised for the UEB. The sequence for introducing the Braille configurations has been organized into 56 clusters of letters, numerals, contractions, short forms, punctuation and special signs, with specific clusters devoted to the reading and writing practice of previously learned contractions. Also included in this curriculum are a Pre-Braille Assessment, Braille Checklists and ideas for games. This program can be used with beginning braille readers, as well as those readers who need to learn braille when they are older.

      Unified English Braille (UEB) Practice sentences: Reading & Writing Exercises to Promote Speed and Accuracy

      Provides comprehensive practice sentences for each braille contraction, set up in a sequential, easy-to-learn format.  All UEB contractions are included, as well as many of the more commonly used punctuation and symbols.  Only preciously taught contractions are used in each sentence.  This tool can be used for any aged student who is familiar with the braille alphabet, parents or anyone who would like to learn the braille code. Visit: https://www.actualtactuals.com/


      Paths To Literacy UEB Lessons

      The staff at Paths to Literacy for Student Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired have been creating and adding new UEB lessons to their website. These lessons are focused on helping older students make the transition from EBAE to UEB. http://www.pathstoliteracy.org/search/node/ueb

      UEB Charts

      UEB Numeric Flowchart
      Kathy Kremplewksi from the Florida Instructional Materials Center, created a UEB Numeric Indicator Flowchart. From Kathy: “I think of “modes” kind of like roads. So, the numeric indicator starts two parallel “roads”, one for grade 1 mode and one for numeric mode. But what stops each “road” is different. The second box lists things that do not stop either “road”, so grade 1 mode and numeric mode continue. The third box lists things that stop numeric mode but does not stop grade 1 mode. Our two parallel “roads” have become one “road”. Finally, the last box lists what stops grade 1 mode. Hopefully this analogy and the flowchart help simplify this concept a little."

      Duxbury UEB Chart

      Duxbury's one-page chart listing the contractions and short forms in alphabetical order:http://duxburysystems.com/images/ueb_black.pdf

      Aroga Technologies UEB Chart
      Aroga Technologies presents the UEB contractions and symbols by category:http://www.aroga.com/unified-english-braille-chart-tabloid-11-x-17-pdf-format/

      Nemeth-UEB Guidance

      Guidance for Transcription Using the Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts

      This is a revision of the provisional guidance issued earlier by BANA regarding the method of switching between the Nemeth Code and Unified English Braille.

      Music Braille Code 2015

      BANA is pleased to announce the publication of the new Music Braille Code, 2015. This completely revised publication is available for free download in two electronic versions: PDF and BRF. Hardcopy versions will also be produced and sold by the American Printing House for the Blind.

      To access the Music Braille Code in a PDF file, go to http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/Music_Braille_Code_2015.pdf.

      To access the Music braille Code in a BRF file, go to http://www.brailleauthority.org/music/music.html.

      UEB Tutorials and Resources

      • Scalar’s Publishing :
        • Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille ISBN 978-0-9960353-0-9 $98.50
        • Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction Companion Reader: Unified English Braille ISBN 978-0-9960353-2-3 $38.50
      • Hadley School for the Blind will provide distance education courses on the UEB beginning in January of 2015. These will be available free through their Adult Continuing Education Program (ACE) and the High School Program, or for a fee for professionals seeking CEU credits through their Hadley School for Professional Studies Program (HSPS). The HSPS program provides a certificate for successful completion of the course which notes the CEUs, grade, date completed. It is not based on a semester enrollment, but is an open enrollment.
      • Transcriber’s UEB Course (CNIB) - a self-directed course, covering eleven topics with fifteen practice exercises, for transcribers, proofreaders and BLV/TVI’s.
      • UEB Online, Braille Training for Sighted Learners - a training program created by the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children’s Renwick Centre, Australia. Appropriate for teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals.

      Information from the Braille Authority of North America (BANA)

      Learn UEB

      • NLS Braille Transcriber Course - For information about the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) braille transcriber course: https://nfb.org/braille-transcribing
      UEB Literacy consists of two modules that, together, address the literacy aspects of Unified English Braille. Module 1 presents lessons 1-14, and Module 2 presents lessons 15-31.

      UEB Introductory Mathematics is presented as ten lessons that address mathematics symbols and expressions that are encountered during the primary years of schooling. It is recommended that the UEB Literacy modules are completed prior to commencing UEB Introductory Mathematics.

      UEB Extension Mathematics (available 3rd Quarter 2019) consists of ten lessons that address mathematics symbols and expressions that are encountered during the secondary years of schooling. The UEB Introductory Mathematics module must be completed before commencing the UEB Extension Mathematics module.

      Wisconsin UEB online series
      • Introduction to Unified English Braille
      • Unified English Braille for Transcribers
      • Unified English Braille for Vision Teachers

      Unified English Braille Online Training (UEBOT)
      : Presented by Northern Illinois University
        Unified English Braille through a Powerful and Responsive eLearning Platform (UEB PREP)  Presented by Portland State University
        • Target audience: Consumers who are blind and visually impaired, family members of individuals who are visually impaired, professionals who work with those who are visually impaired
        • Pilot in September 2015 to train those currently familiar with EBAE

        UEB Rules and Guidelines

        UEB Apps



        If you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact Leslie Durst at 317-554-2740 or 800-833-2198: email: Leslie Durst For information on trainings, contact Robin Thoma at Robin.Thoma@indstate.edu 

        To read more about the UEB, please visit BANA or International Council on English Braille.

        Read more

        Vision Resources

        Apps for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        Various apps we found that are useful for Blind and Low Vision persons using Apple and Andriod products. 

        Accessible MasterMind is an iOS color code-breaking board game.  Crack the code in the fewest tries possible.  Choose a combination using six colors. The game is compatible with VoiceOver. App is $.99 from iTunes.

        Accessible Reading Comparison Chart, developed by Julie Ann Lieberman, MS and Laura Cantagallo, help the user decipher the differences between a number of accessible PDF reading apps available in Google Play.

        Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

        AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

        Ballyland Magic App by Sonokids is an educational iPad game that helps young children with vision impairment to learn and practice a number of VoiceOver gestures.

        BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download) which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.

        Braille Tutor, from iEnable, is an app to teach and practice UEB braille skills.  Visit Perkins eLearning to read the app review by Diane Brauner. You can learn more about Braille Tutor by visiting the iEnable website. Braille Tutor is free through the Apple store for lessons 1-19, uncontracted braille. There is a fee for lessons 20-91 in contracted UEB. Free at iTunes.

        Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

        Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

        DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

        Draw2Measure Protractor is a free app for iOS® devices designed for students who are blind and visually impaired, and can be used by sighted students too.  It gives all students an alternative way to measure angles.  Students can place an angle over the screen of a device, such as a phone or tablet, and trace along the sides of the angle with a fingertip or stylus. The app records the locations of the sides and then calculates the angle. For objects that may not fit on a screen, students can find measurements by rotating the device itself, which utilizes the built-in gyroscope sensor to measure the angle. It reports angle measurements in both degrees and radians. Watch a short YouTube video to see the Draw2Measure app in action. Draw2Measure is a free download from the Apple App Store and works with devices running iOS 8 or later. It cannot be downloaded directly from APH. Free on iTunes.

        eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.  

        Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.

        Fleksy  - This auto-correct iOS app allows blind and visually impaired users to type faster without worrying about typing mistakes.  It is compatible with the iPhone and iPad.  Free from iTunes and offers in-app purchases.

        GetThere free app for Android is designed specifically for blind and visually-impaired users. The app does not display a map, but tells the user where they are and how to get to their destination. Navigational guidance automatically talks to the user before and after every intersection. The user can ask GetThere to tell them where they are, simply by shaking their mobile device.

        KNFB Reader App for iOS recently released version 2.7.3 which now allows the user to take a picture by pressing the Volume Up button on their device and the Volume Down button to execute field of view.  Cost $99.99 from iTunes.

        Learning Ally Link for mobile is an educational reading app designed for learning through listening. Learning Ally provides more than 80,000 human-narrated audiobooks and audio textbooks for dyslexic, blind and visually impaired readers.  Free on iTunes.

        Light Detector - Detects sources of light that have been left on or to detect location of windows.  $1.99 from iTunes. Compatible with the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

        MBraille is an intriguing new iOS app. The $39 version allows you to write in contracted English Braille, send a variety of communications, and edit. The free version lets you learn the app and send tweets. To download visit iTunes.

        Optelec Magnifier App for iOS devices.  The app provides basic magnification and high contrast functionality.  The Optelec Magnifier App is free from iTunes

        overTHERE is a free, accessibility app that helps individuals who are blind explore and interact with the surrounding environment by using virtual audible signs.  Free from iTunes.

        Pocket Braille Reference - supports one symbol word contractions and one-letter word contractions. For use on iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Free from iTunes.

        Prizmo Go- Instant Text Capture is a free, iOS app that allows the user to quickly capture printed text with the camera. Recognized and selected text can be read aloud. The app works with VoiceOver, provides spoken guidance prior to shooting and has text-to-speech capabilities for reading printed documents.  Free from iTunes.

        Read2Go - App from BookShare.org for iOS devices, i.e iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch users to read Bookshare books. $19.99 from iTunes.

        Seeing AI, developed by Microsoft, has been released to the Apple App Store. The app harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to open up the visual world and describe nearby people, text and objects. The app uses artificial intelligence and the camera on your iPhone to perform a number of useful functions: reading documents, identifying a product based on its barcode, recognizing people based on their face, providing a description, and recognizing images within other apps. Free from iTunes.

        Speech Central - Speech Central is an accessible Windows, Mac, Android and iOS app that lets the user listen to web content such as news, DAISY content and BookShare using synthesized speech.

        Talking Calculator - Scientific calculator for blind and low vision users. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. $1.99 from iTunes.  

        Talkler – a VoiceOver compatible iOS app that enables blind and visually impaired persons to use voice commands to listen to and manage emails. Free from iTunes. Popular in-app purchases offered from $1.99-$19.99. 

        TapTapSee - An iOS app to help blind persons identify objects they encounter in their daily lives.  The user takes a picture of what is in front of them and the app identifies and speaks the identification back to the user.  The application also features instant recognition on all US paper currency.  Free from iTunes.  In-app purchases available.

        ThumbJam- With over 40 sampled instruments and hundreds of scales this app allows user to effortlessly play any musical genre.  Compatible with iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone.  $8.99 on iTunes.  

        VisualBraille - Translate common words, sentences, and numbers from text to Braille.  For use with iPhone and iPad. $2.99 from iTunes.

        VisualBraille Lite - Free app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad from iTunes.

        vBookz- Accessibility-friendly audio book application with text to speech built-in.  Works with iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.  $4.99 from iTunes.

        VisionSim by Braille Institute - A Free app developed by Braille Institute of America for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices to simulate nine degenerative eye diseases. Free from iTunes.

        VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

        Voice Dream Reader is a mobile reading tool, text-to-speech (TTS) app for iOS. It comes with 78 voices, will extract text from PDF, ePub, text-based DAISY, Word, and Text files in Dropbox, Google Drive or on your device. Users can listen to web pages with built-in Browser, or on their Pocket or Instapaper reading List. It reads books from Gutenberg and Bookshare. It has a personal pronunciation dictionary, sleep timer, work and line highlighting, VoiceOver support, large font size and customizable colors, and navigates through text by sentence, paragraph, page, and chapter and 15, 30, 60 seconds. Users can add bookmarks, highlights, and notes. For more information, visit the Voice Dream website. Available from the iTunes for $9.99.

        Web Reader – An app that uses text to speech technology along with web page content recognition to read web pages aloud. Compatible with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.  $1.99 from iTunes.

        WritePad - Handwriting recognition, note-taking translation app.  Compatible with iPad.  $4.99 on iTunes.
        .


        Braille Software Programs

        Career Information

        Eye Disorders

        Guide Dog Agencies

        Indiana O&M Specialists

        Indiana Websites

        National Organizations

        American Academy of Ophthalmology

        American Academy of Optometry

        Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps (TASH)

        American Council of the Blind

        American Diabetes Association

        American Foundation for the Blind

        American Optometric Association

        American Printing House for the Blind

        Assistive Technology Industry Association

        Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AERBVI)

        Association for Retinopathy of Prematurity and Related Diseases (ROP)

        Blind Babies Foundation

        Blind Children’s Center

        Bookshare.org

        Braille Authority of North America (BANA)

        Canadian National Institute for the Blind

        CAST (Center for Applied Special Technology)

        Center for Parent Information and Resources

        Closing the Gap

        Council for Exceptional Children

        Council of Citizens with Low Vision International

        Foundation Fighting Blindness (retinal diseases)

        Hadley School for the Blind

        Helen Keller National Center

        International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

        Learning Ally

        Lighthouse Guild

        National Association for Albinism and Hypopigmentation (NOAH)

        National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE)

        National Center on Deaf-Blindness

        National Center on Disability and Access to Education (NCDAE)

        National Eye Institute

        National Family Association for Deaf-Blind (NFADB)

        National Federation of the Blind

        National Industries for the Blind

        National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

        National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)

        National Organization of Parents of Blind Children

        National Resource Center for Blind Musicians, Music and Arts Center for Humanity

        Prevent Blindness America

        Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision at Mississippi State University

        United States Association for Blind Athletes

        United States Blind Golf Association

        United States Braille Chess Association

        Vision Council of America: Better Vision Institute 

        Parents and Families

        Product Catalogs

        Resources for Learning Braille

        Video Description Resources

        Vision Resources

        Access USA

        AEM (Accessible Educational Materials)

        American Journal of Ophthalmology 
        This site features a searchable database of abstracts from articles incurrent and past issues of the American Journal of Ophthalmology including topics about latest advances in ophthalmic surgical techniques or recent research findings.

        AppAdvice -AppAdvice is the ideal resource on the Web for people looking to discover iOS apps.

        AppleVis -AppleVis is a community-powered website for vision-impaired users of Apple's range of Mac computers, the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

        Best iPad Apps -List of iPad apps for teachers. Ranges from digital story telling to apps to teach creativity.

        Bill of Rights for All Children with Visual Impairments [ ENG ] [ SPAN ] YouTube video

        Blindness Resource Center

        Braille and Large Print Calendars

        Braille Bug

        Braille Help Electronic Mail List

        College Accessibility for Visually Impaired Students --Sponsored by Online Colleges

        Descriptive Video Service

        Disability Data Resource-InfoUse Project

        Guide to Braille Resources

        Guide to Visual Disabilities: How Colleges Help Visually Impaired Students Succeed

        Helping Students with Visual Disabilities: Resources, Tools and Technology to Foster School Success

        Louis Database

        Laser Eye Surgery Hub, UK -This site provides an international collection of online resources regarding blindness and low vision.

        Minimizing Vision Problems in College: A Student’s Guide to Eye Health and Wellness

        Money Readers

        Neuroscience for Kids, Vision

        NIMAC Database

        Paths to Literacy For students who are blind or visually impaired.

        Perkins Scout

        Physical Education (PE) Website at APH 

        Prevent Blindness 

        Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        Vision Associates

        Vision Impaired and Blindness Resources

         

        Read more

        News for Parents of Children Who are Blind or Have Low Vision

        Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network 

        Lighthouse Guild Parent Support Network provides resources to connect with other parents, including a monthly parent newsletter with helpful tips and resources, as well as tele-support groups and presentations. Visit the Lighthouse Guild website to learn more.

        VO Lab


        VO Lab is a new app by Sonokids for adolescents and adults who are blind or have low vision. This educational iPad game is designed for students aged 14+ to learn touch gestures and concepts of VoiceOver and VoiceOver gestures, Apple’s built-in screen reader on iOS Devices. The app is both entertaining and educational, and provides beginning learners of VoiceOver with opportunities to gain the required foundation skills to use the iPad or iPhone independently. App is $4.99 on iTunes.

        Ballyland Magic App


        Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built in screen reader.  Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

        Storybud

        Storybud is an online story site, developed by a father with low vision so that he could interact with his children during bedtime story time. Storybud provides the online stories in various formats: audio only; a combined text and audio; or text on the screen only. The site is accessible for persons who are visually impaired using speech software. Visit www.storybud.org for more information.

        Center for Parent Information and Resources

        The Center for Parent Information and Resources has an updated fact sheet on children with visual impairment, including blindness. Visit http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/specific-disabilities/ to read more. 

        Learning Ally’s Website Adds Features for Parents


        Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization serving 300,000 children and adults across the U.S. who have visual, learning and reading-based disabilities, has transformed its website and launched new features and services to further benefit its members as well as parents and teachers. Parents can check out the more stremlined and user-friendly web site to access the organization's on-line library of more than 75,000 human-narrated audiobooks, including the world's largest library of audio textbooks. 

        VOICEtext, providing sentence-by-sentence highlighting of text on the screen in sync with audio narration. In its initial stages, this feature is being incorporated into a limited selection of titles in Learning Ally's library, will expand into more titles over time, and will benefit individuals for whom a multi-sensory approach to reading is recommended.

        Perkins Resources

        scout logo transThe Perkins School for the Blind have resources for parent, kids, and teacher that include fiction and non-fiction books and Internet resources. Read more at http://www.perkins.org/history/visit/research-library. Additional teacher resources are located at http://www.perkins.org/elearning.

        Perkins Scout is a searchable database of carefully evaluated online resources related to blindness and visual impairment. The website mascot, a·dog guide·named Scout, will help you retrieve the information you’re looking for; all of it has been reviewed by Perkins experts and organized for your convenience.·More information is available at http://www.perkinselearning.org/scout.

        Free Braille Books

        Seedlings Logo 7 11 newcolorsThrough the Seedlings Book Angel Program, visually-impaired children can receive two free braille books. Choose from print/braille/picture books, print/braille books, or braille only books. Register online at www.seedlings.org.


        Expanded Core Curriculum Resource

        The American Foundation for the Blind and the Perkins School for the Blind provide, a grassroots forum and a central resource and gateway to more information about the Expanded Core Curriculum

        WonderBaby


        WonderBaby.orgwb birds on text small, a project funded by Perkins School for the Blind, is dedicated to helping parents of young children with vision impairments as well as children with multiple disabilities. Much of the content on WonderBaby is provided by parents. They are not just passive observers or consumers of information; many site users comment on articles, answer questions in the Q&A forum, and share hyperlinks to net resources. Some submit original articles. It's in this sharing that WonderBaby earns much of its authenticity. These are real parents with real kids who are blind or visually disabled. They can empathize with other parents seeking answers. Having educated themselves, they feel compelled to give back so that fellow and future parents of children who are blind or visually disabled can also benefit from their experiences.

        Youth Transition Toolkit now available online from Talent Knows No Limits

        The "Youth Transition Toolkit: A Guide for Young People with Disabilities Transitioning to Adulthood" is now available online from Talent Knows No Limits (TKNL), a public information campaign of the California Health Incentives Improvement Project (CHIIP). Developed in partnership with young people, the toolkit is designed as a how-to guide on preparing for transition to adulthood and making choices about their own health care, education, employment, finances, independent living, and social and recreational activities. Some of the questions the toolkit helps youth address include:
        • What is Transition Planning? What is an IEP and how can I lead my IEP Meeting?
        • How can I manage my Social Security and medical benefits?
        • How does college differ from high school? How can I obtain services for my disability during college?
        • What resources are available to help me choose the right career?
        • Is there assistive technology available that can help me secure a job?
        • How can I find accessible housing to live on my own?
        • What should I do to prepare for a job interview?
        While some of the services and resources provided are California state-specific, much of the guidance is applicable to youth in any state. The toolkit was developed with funding from a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

        To learn more, visit the Youth Transition Toolkit website.

        Family Connect

        Do you want to connect with other parents of a blind or visually impaired child? Check out the American Foundation for the Blind’s “Family Connect” web site at http://www.familyconnect.org/parentsitehome.aspx. Information on numerous subjects of interest to parents, such as IEP’s, toys, eye care, etc. can also be found on this site.


        Braille Tales Free Print-Braille Children’s Book Program

        The American Printing House for the Blind is seeking applicants for its free print-braille children’s book program, Braille Tales. Braille Tales collaborates with the Dolly Parton Imagination Library and the Kentucky Correctional Institute to mail 6 print-braille books a year to families with a child and/or a parent with a visual impairment.

        Braille Tales is designed specifically for blind preschool children (age 0-5) and their families to foster early literacy and familiarity with braille. The program brings accessible, age-appropriate books into the homes of children who might not otherwise experience braille until they begin school.



        National Braille Press, Programs Promoting Braille Literacy

        pressHands On! Books for Blind Children is a series of programs for blind children that seek to provide braille books to thousands of blind children and their families throughout every stage of their learning and to provide advocacy and education promoting the benefits of braille. These programs include: Readbooks! Because Braille Matters Family Outreach Program, Bumpy Basics, Children's Braille Book Club, and Lifelong Literacy. Visit the NBP web page for more information about these children’s programs at http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/programs/index.html.

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        International Standard Book Numbers (ISBN)

        What Are They...and, Why Are They So Important?
        Since 2007, the ISBN has been a 13-digit number that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally. Previously, the ISBN was a ten-digit number.

        What is the purpose of an ISBN?
        The purpose of the ISBN is to establish and identify one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition, allowing for more efficient marketing of products by booksellers, libraries, universities, wholesalers and distributors.

        What are the unique characteristics of an ISBN?
        Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN. Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused. An ISBN is printed on the lower portion of the back cover of a book above the bar code and on the copyright page.

        Examples of formats which require a unique ISBN include:
        • Hardcover versions of textbooks
        • Paperbound versions of textbooks
        • Indiana Editions of textbooks
        • National Editions of textbooks
        • Teachers Editions of textbooks
        • Examination copies of textbooks (often shared with districts during district new adoption process)
        • Revised editions of textbooks
        • E-book format of textbooks that are purchased from publisher
        • Etc.
        Some ISBN's end in an "X," in which case enter the "X" into the search string

        Does the ISBN-13 have any meaning imbedded in the numbers?
        The five parts of an ISBN are as follows:
        1. The current ISBN-13 will be prefixed by "978"...usually
        2. Group or country identifier which identifies a national or geographic grouping of publishers
        3. Publisher identifier which identifies a particular publisher within a group
        4. Title identifier which identifies a particular title or edition of a title
        5. Check digit is the single digit at the end of the ISBN which validates the ISBN
        Tricks and Tips to Identifying the Correct ISBN!

        When searching for an ISBN, school-based staff often give the Digital Rights Manager (DRM) the ISBN of the teacher edition or an examination copy.· Both of these editions have a different ISBN number than the student textbook edition ISBN. The IERC requires the student edition ISBN number as all of books we transcribe, produce and provide are student editions.

        The following are TIPS to identifying the correct ISBN:
        • Ask the school-based staff to make a copy of the back cover of the Student Edition of the textbook or a copy of the copyright page.
        • Google the ISBN (the actual number, itself, without the hyphens).· You can also enter the number at www.gettextbooks.com to verify the correct edition and textbook information.
        IMPORTANT NOTE: Do NOT enter the hyphens of the ISBN when searching any database.

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        The IERC Braille Project

        Braille Project Computer Display
        Braille Project Tactile Graphics
        Braille Project Tiger Embosser

        The mission of the Braille Project is to provide high quality, well formatted braille instructional materials in a timely manner to Indiana’s school-age students who are blind or have low vision and whose assessed, primary reading medium is braille.

        Orders for braille instructional materials are submitted thru the ICAM. The IERC assigns transcripts to the Braille Project for instructional materials, currently not available in braille, as their capacity allows.


        The Braille Project utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcribers.

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        The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)

        Miami Logo

        The Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) was established in May of 2008 thru the collaborative efforts of the Indiana Department of Corrections, the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired/Indiana Educational Resource Center and the Indiana Department of Education. It is the goal of the project to provide quality braille, large print, and accessible instructional materials to students who are blind or have low vision in Indiana’s local schools, in a timely and efficient manner, while providing a skill to the offenders that will increase employment opportunities thus reducing recidivism.

        MAMP produces and transcribe books from National Instructional Material Accessible Standard (NIMAS) formatted publisher files whenever possible. NIMAS files are electronic publisher files that have been formatted or tagged in a universal format to assist accessible format textbook producers in producing accessible specialized formats in a timely manner. By utilizing NIMAS files, textbooks no longer need to be scanned in or input manually. This significantly speeds up the process of producing braille, large print and digitally rendered textbooks. However, the ICAM can only access NIMAS files from the national repository, the National Instructional Materials Center (NIMAC), if the schools require the publishers per their textbook contracts to send them down to the NIMAC. Be sure to include this contractual language when purchasing textbooks from the publisher to insure that the appropriate files can be secured for production and transcription, especially for core instructional materials not on the state adoption lists. See an example of this contractual language.

        Print copies of the textbooks are still required for production and transcription, along with the NIMAS file, to insure that all text, images, and image descriptions are included and placed in the correct sequence.

        MAMP utilizes state-of-the art production equipment and techniques in the transcription and production of braille textbooks. All transcription staff meets the national certification requirements for braille transcription.

        Miami01
        Miami02
        Miami03

        MAMPStaffPicture2016

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        IERC Federal Quota Annual Census/Registration of Legally Blind Students

        The IERC administers the Federal Quota dollars for the State of Indiana through the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) and registers all eligible legally blind students, public and private, with APH.

        Each year during the month of January, Authorized Officials or their Designees are asked to participate in the "Annual Census of Students Who Are Legally Blind". The purpose of the registration is to enroll eligible students who meet the legal definition of blindness to generate Federal Quota dollars.

        In order for the State of Indiana to participate in the Federal "Act to Promote the Education of the Blind", the registration status of all students who are legally blind is reviewed annually. The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) administers the federal quota allocation for all states, including Indiana. Funds are appropriated by Congress to APH for the production of specialized instructional materials to be used by students who are legally blind. The appropriated amount is then divided into separate accounts within each state according to the number of students who are legally blind reported in an annual registration. Students must be legally blind, enrolled in educational programs below the college level and have a parental consent form, in English  or  Spanish , on file in order to be eligible for inclusion on the list sent by the IERC to APH. For additional information regarding the parental consent process, read our consent to release student information talking points as well a short FAQ document.

        Schools or agencies may order items available from APH federal quota allocation equal to the funds generated by the number of students who are legally blind registered by them each year. So long as funds are available within a given year, the IERC will honor any reasonable and legitimate request for APH material that is approved by the designated contact person. Items ordered with APH federal quota funds must originally be used by students who are legally blind and generated the dollars. Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.

        For more information regarding the federal quota, visit: APH Federal Quota Overview

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        IERC (Indiana Educational Resource Center)

        Student using a Braille Notetaker

        Student using a Braille Notetaker

        Student reading a braille book

        Student reading a braille book

        Student using a Digital Player/Recorder

        Student using a Digital Player/Recorder


        • The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) is a statewide, centralized depository of specialized formats for school-age students who are blind or visually impaired enrolled in local education agencies. These formats include braille and large print instructional materials, as well as tangible aids and equipment specifically designed for use by students with visual impairments.

          The IERC collaborates with the PATINS Project, Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM) for the provision of services. Request for instructional materials, for school-age students who are blind or have low vision, are submitted to the ICAM by the LEA appointed Digital Right’s Managers (DRM) and are processed by the IERC. All materials are provided at no cost to eligible students and are on loan to the ordering local education agencies.

          In addition to the centralized, statewide depository, the IERC also houses and manages a Braille Transcription Project and oversees the Miami Accessible Media Project located at the Miami Correctional Facility in Bunker Hill, Indiana.

          Indiana Education Resource Center Brochure

        • IERC Protocol for COVID-19 Mail Handling and Cleaning

          ICAM Textbook Ordering

          Please keep the orders coming in for next school year so we have as much time as possible for production of large print and braille instructional materials. When ordering, please confirm that the schools will be open to receive materials at that location over the summer. Given our current situation, BLV teachers/consultants can continue to choose to have textbooks shipped to their home address as we have done for the last few months. Please provide Martha LaBounty in our office with your home location information so she can update that in our system when placing orders.

          A reminder…If you search the ICAM for an item and your results are unsuccessful, you may place a Special Request for that item. To place a special request, log in to the ICAM. On the main page, select Special Request and enter data or after you have searched the ICAM with the ISBN or APH catalog number, you will also have the option to place a “Special Request.”

          IERC Material Returns

          We are getting books and equipment returns coming in from the 2019-2020 school year.  Thank you for making the effort to gather up materials from schools and student homes and returning them to the IERC so we can get them cleaned up, checked back in and recirculated! We understand that this has been an unusual time for all of us, and some of you may not be able to gather up materials at this time but we appreciate your time and effort getting this completed when you can.

          Be sure to return any Perkins SmartBraillers and MATT Connects per the loan agreement.  Also, any professional publications need to be returned as well.  

          Due to the current COVID-19 situation, it would be preferable to return materials via mail service so we can follow our mail handling protocol to store incoming materials for 24 hours prior to opening boxes. However, for those who prefer to hand deliver returns to the IERC, please call ahead and schedule a time for your delivery. We will be practicing proper social distancing protocol. 

          We do ask to please clean all materials before returning to the IERC.  IERC staff will also be performing an additional deep cleaning of materials prior to putting them on our shelves or recirculating the materials.To view our mail handling protocol, please visit our webpage.

          When returning materials to the IERC, please visit our webpage to access return Free Matter for the Blind mailing labels. Please be sure to complete the return address as this helps us sort incoming materials that come off the mail truck. We would appreciate you notifying us of any discrepancies in your shipments using the Inventory Return Forms. This would include missing or damaged volumes or missing or damaged parts of returned kits.

          Annual Inventory Recall Process

          Information regarding the Annual Inventory Recall Process has been sent out to all BLV’s. We appreciate those teachers who have been updating their information. If you know you will be renewing or reassigning instructional materials or specialized equipment for your students, we would appreciate you logging into the ICAM and updating that information. That will let us know which copies of materials will not be available for loan from our collection and help us project production needs.

          IERC Shipment Confirmation

          A packing slip will be enclosed in each shipment the IERC sends out this summer.

          Visit the IERC webpage for step-by-step instructions at http://www.patinsproject.com/ierc-policies-and-procedures/packing-slip-delivery-confirmation

          Summer Opportunities for Students with Visual Impairments

          NFB Bell Academy

          The Bell Academy will be free to all participants this year.  NFB is providing all materials needed.  They will be shipped to participants homes prior to their chosen session. Kids will still have time with a licensed TVI every day and they will meet with their peers via Zoom. 

          NFB Bell Dates:

          June 1, 2020 through June 12, 2020

          June 22, 2020 through July 3, 2020

          July 27, 2020 through August 7, 2020

          A Spanish session will be offered during the June 22-July 3, 2020 session.

          If you or any parents you share this information with have any questions, please contact Kimberly Banks at 404-259-2641. To view the registration page, visit the NFB BELL Academy website.

          Virtual ExCEL Camp

          The inaugural Virtual ExCEL Camp will be held from mid-June through mid-August and will include a live hour at 2:00 ET, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and is free to all registrants. The target audience will continue to be for students. Also included are five at-home extension activities for the camp theme. Virtual ExCEL Camp will be separated by age/grade groups. Because students are not always able to attend during the scheduled hour, the sessions will be recorded. Please register your students with their needs and levels in mind. Students will receive a camp shirt and other APH goodies. To learn more and to register, visit the APH Virtual ExCEL Camp webpage.

          Project Inspire

          Project INSPIRE will offer two courses online this summer.

          • Pre-Kindergarten – 1st Grade Students: Nemeth Code within UEB Contexts and Strategies for Supporting the Student in Building Math Skills.
          • An Introduction to Nemeth Code Symbols Used in Grades 2 to 5 and Strategies for Supporting Elementary Students in Building Math Skills.

          Check the Project INSPIRE’s website for updates or follow on Facebook.

          Additional Resources

          The National Center on Accessible Educational Materials has created a webpage dedicated to eLearning and Accessible Materials for All Students. This information may be shared with classroom teachers and other staff to assist in the creation of accessible digital materials.

          Make sure your students are enrolled in Bookshare and/or Learning Ally as well as the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Materials (BARD) and that they have access to these accounts from home. These free reading tools will help your students continue to access information and participate in learning.

          IERC Summer Hours

          The IERC will resume full staffing and hours as of June 1, 2020. Our office will be open from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm each day. If you have questions or need assistance please call our office at 317-554-2740 or 1-800-833-2198 or email us at ierc@isbvik12.org.

          Have a wonderful summer!



        • Hours of Operation: 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. EST

          Mail:
          Indiana Educational Resource Center
          7725 North College Avenue
          Indianapolis, IN 46240-2504

          Phone: (317) 554-2740
          Toll-free: (800) 833-2198
          Fax: (317) 475-9181

          eMail:
          IERCEmail@isbvik12.org
        • Upcoming BLV Trainings

          Check back soon!

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        Frequently Asked Questions

        When should braille and large print instructional materials be ordered?

        All textbook orders for the upcoming school year should be ordered by April 15 of the current school year if possible.  Order all textbooks titles you know that the student will require.  It takes a minimum of 4 months for new braille transcriptions and 3 months for production of large print/accessible files, sometimes longer during the summer peak order season.

        Is there a cost to borrow materials from the IERC?

        LEA's do not have to pay for the materials received from the IERC.  Materials are provided through Federal Quota dollars and Part B discretionary funds and are on loan to the LEA's.  All items are tracked and LEA's are accountable for the return of materials to the IERC when the student has finished using them. 

        Why do you need the ISBN number on textbook orders?

        The ISBN or International Standard Book Number is a unique 13-digit number that identifies one title or edition of a title from one specific publisher and is unique to that edition.  Prior to 2007, it was a ten-digit number.  Each format or binding must have a separate ISBN.  Once assigned, an ISBN can never be reused.  This number helps the IERC pin-point the exact textbook information.  Read more about ISBN numbers here.

        Sometimes classroom teachers provide the wrong textbook information to me and I order the wrong large print or braille book. If the IERC provides the book I have ordered, but it is the wrong title or edition, will they provide a second, corrected copy?

        Only if we have it in our collection, ready to loan.  We will not purchase a second copy as these items are very costly.  It is the responsibility of the LEA to insure the accuracy of the order information prior to placing the order the first time.  The IERC will provide the LEA with commercial sources where they can purchase the materials directly if needed.

        Does the IERC supply magnifiers, CCTV's or other non-APH materials?

        No.  The LEA's will need to purchase these materials directly from the commercial vendors.  The LEA's may want to contact the PATINS Project Lending Library for product information or possible equipment loan. http://www.patinsproject.org/

        May DRM's order more that one copy of a braille or large print textbook for a student?

        The IERC will provide one set of textbooks in braille or large print.  It is the LEA's responsibility to provide a second copy if it has been documented as a need on the student's individualized education plan.  The IERC's role is to assist the LEA's in the provision of accessible instructional materials.

        Are the materials ordered with federal quota dollars generated by my students the property of the school or do the materials need to be returned to the IERC?

        Materials ordered with Federal Quota dollars are the property of the State of Indiana and must be returned to the IERC after the student is finished using them.  It is the responsibility of the state's Ex Officio (IERC Director) to oversee the federal account, which includes the distribution, tracking, and re-loan of educational materials purchased with quota dollars.  All federal quota dollars as well as materials purchased with those dollars must be accounted for.

        May the student consume braille and large print workbooks?

        Workbooks or consumable textbooks ONLY may be consumed if needed.  If materials are consumed, they must be accounted for during the annual inventory recall process as consumed so we can update our inventory accordingly.

        If my student moves in-state, but to another LEA, can I send his/her materials with them or do they need to be returned to the IERC?

        All materials loaned to an LEA for use by a specific student must be returned to the IERC if the student moves to a different school corporation.  It will be the responsibility of the DRM from the new school corporation to update the student information on the ICAM and to order materials required for use by the student enrolled in the new LEA. 

        If borrowed braille and large print textbooks and specialized aids and equipment are not accounted for or returned to the IERC at the end of each school year, will the ordering district be charged for their replacement?

        The local education agency is ultimately responsible for tracking and accounting for all ordered instructional materials purchased with state and federal dollars and loaned to them by the IERC at the end of each school year.  The IERC reserves the right to charge the ordering local education agency for lost or unaccounted braille and large print books as well as specialized aids and equipment.  For books with multiple volumes, the school district would be charged for the cost to replace the entire book, if the IERC cannot replace individual volumes.

        Why do I need to send two print copies of a textbook for production of transcription?

        If textbooks ordered are not available in large print or braille, two original copies will be requested by the IERC for production or transcription from the LEA.  One copy is torn apart during the production process and kept on site with the master and the second copy, used for proofreading, is returned to the school after production or transcription is complete.  It is the responsibility of the local education agency to provide the requested print copies of the textbooks, not the IERC or the MAMP.  The local education agency can choose not to send print copies to the IERC for production or transcription and can purchase directly from commercial sources if available. 

        Why did the IERC send out a braille copy of the national edition of a book when the state edition was ordered?

        In order to keep costs down and to prevent the transcription of a braille book already available, the IERC reserves the right to substitute the national edition of an ordered state edition if the publisher verifies that the national edition is classroom compatible with the state edition. 

        Will the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP) produce accessible versions of any textbook?

        No.  Only accessible derivative versions, as a result of the production of the hard copy large print or transcription of a braille textbook, will be made available in accessible formats as determined appropriate by the MAMP.  Any accessible formats produced by the MAMP will appear in the ICAM during a search if the student has qualified for these specialized formats per their IEP.

        May large print and braille instructional materials be ordered directly from the Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)?

        No.  All orders for large print and braille instructional materials must go through the ICAM via the appointed DRM and then to the IERC for review and processing. All orders sent to MAMP originate from the IERC.

        Will the IERC enlarge or transcribe ISTEP preparatory materials?

        The Indiana Educational Resource Center is unable to provide braille or large print copies of ISTEP preparatory materials.  The IERC has been instructed by the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) assessment office that we cannot produce ISTEP materials (even if it is part of a publisher bundle) into an alternate format because these materials are not endorsed by the IDOE. Therefore, because they are not endorsed by the state, we cannot expend our federal Part B dollars to produce alternate formats for our students.  In addition, the material contained in these items, per IDOE, may actually violate the Indiana State Board of Education's Ethical Testing Practices and Procedures.  School corporations are encouraged to use the endorsed ISTEP materials and assessment.

        Will the IERC provide textbooks of a religious nature for a students being served in parentally placed, non-public schools?

        No.  Per the Indiana State Code, we cannot expend federal dollars on the purchase or production of religious curriculum materials for use by students in parentally-placed, non-public schools, including those books from religious publishers. However, if the book is used as part of the local education agency curriculum and has been endorsed by the local education agency, we can provide those titles.

        Does the IERC provide older copyrights or editions of braille and large print textbooks?

        The IERC reserves the right, dependent on funding, to not purchase older copyrights or editions of specialized braille and large print instructional materials.  If the LEA requests an older copyright of a textbook in braille or large print, and the IERC is unable to purchase, the IERC will assist the LEA by researching available commercial vendors for procurement at the local level.  Furthermore, if an LEA writes into a student's individualized education program (IEP) that braille and/or large print textbooks will be provided for a student, it shall not be the ultimate responsibility of the IERC to provide the braille and/or large print textbooks and materials.

        Will the IERC replace braille and large print instructional materials lost by districts?

        Due to limited funds, the IERC cannot replace specialized instructional materials that have been purchased/shipped by the IERC and received at the LEA, then lost or misplaced at the local level.

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        IERC Staff

        NamePositionPhone
        Leslie Durst IERC Director800-833-2198
        317-554-2740
        Martha LaBounty IERC Librarian800-833-2198
        317-554-2740
        Betsy Scott IERC Braille Project Manager800-833-2198
        317-554-2740
        Robert Eutz Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP)800-833-2198
        317-554-2740
        Nonna Cortez Braille Transcriber800-833-2198
        317-554-2740
        Eric Kindler IERC Orders and Materials Specialist800-833-2198
        317-554-2740

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        Indiana UEB Implementation Timeline

        Unified English Braille

        Timeline for Implementation in Indiana

        Compiled by Indiana UEB Implementation Committee

        August 21, 2014; Revised April 13, 2015; November 16, 2015

        Unified English Braille Code

        In November 2012, the Braille Authority of North America (BANA) voted to adopt Unified English Braille (UEB) to replace the current English Braille American Edition (EBAE) in the United States while continuing the use of the Nemeth Code for Mathematics and Science Notation, 1972 Revision, the Music Braille Code 1997, and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Braille Code, 2008. The full motion is posted on the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/ueb/UEBpassed.html.

        BANA, at its November 2013 meeting, affirmed January 4, 2016, (Louis Braille’s birthday) as the date by which the United States will implement the general use of Unified English Braille (UEB). This action was based on a year of dialogue and planning that included the UEB Transition Forum, held on October 16, 2013. For more information visit the BANA website at http://www.brailleauthority.org/pressreleases/pr-2013-11-26.html.

        Indiana Statewide UEB Transition

        Indiana has been actively working on the transition to UEB. A statewide stakeholders committee met in 2014 and 2015, and will continue to meet ongoing to further develop/refine Indiana’s state plan for UEB implementation and to guide the transition. The UEB Implementation Committee consists of representatives from the Statewide Resource Center, State AT Project, University Training Programs, Adult Services, Residential School and Outreach Staff, TBLV’s from around the state, Prison Braille Program, Braille Transcribers, and the Indiana Department of Education.

        The Indiana UEB state plan was submitted to and approved by the Indiana Department of Education in September 2014. To date: transcribers have trained in the UEB and received their Canadian UEB certification. They are currently seeking U.S. national UEB certification; university programs have implemented UEB coursework for their teacher training programs; and workshops, conferences and webinars have and will be conducted for BLV teaching and paraprofessional staff.

        Considerations for Math Code

        UEB is one code for literary, mathematics, and computer science text elements. The UEB technical code for math and science is part of the UEB and is used in all grade levels; therefore the use of the term UEB implies a complete code that includes math.

        As a default, requests for instructional materials for subjects that require math code (i.e., science and mathematics), for all grades, will be produced in UEB with Nemeth Code for mathematics.  UEB will be provided in lieu of Nemeth Code only if the student’s IEP dictates UEB for math instruction.  The Case Conference Committee (CCC) must determine if UEB or UEB with Nemeth better meets the instructional needs of the student.

        When it is determined that braille is a consideration for the student who is blind, then the code for the instruction of math/technical subjects (Nemeth or UEB) will need to be specified and a written justification provided.

        To view “Nemeth or UEB: Factors and Considerations for Math Code” developed by the UEB Implementation Sub-Committee, click here

        Timeline

        The transition to UEB from EBAE in Indiana will be a six year plan, based on a school year calendar.  It began with the 2013-2014 SY and will run through the 2018-2019 SY.  Full implementation of the UEB (i.e. instruction, materials, assessment) is targeted for the 2018-2019 SY.

        Each local education agency (LEA), based on the approved state timeline, will be responsible for developing a plan for implementation of the UEB at the local level to meet the full implementation UEB date. The Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) will work closely with LEA’s to best meet the educational braille needs of individual students.

        Implementation of this timeline involves the collaboration of state and national partners and may change as state and national information changes or becomes available.

        Timeline Breakdown

        2013-2014 SY

        • Transcriber training.

        • Research and begin drafting state plan.

           

        2014-2015 SY

        • Transcriber training and certification.

        • Approval of a state plan for UEB implementation.

        • Statewide UEB professional development for BLV teacher and paraprofessional staff (workshops, conferences, braille training, webinars and UEB resources).

        • January 2015

          • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2015-2016 school year, for Grades K-5.

          • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE. Exceptions will be made for students just learning the UEB, who have had no previous training in the EBAE.

          • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

          • Spring 2015

        IDOE provides state assessments in EBAE/Nemeth.

        2015-2016 SY

        • September 2015

        Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in Grades K-5.  Begin using available UEB materials.

        • January 2016

          • IERC begins transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth Code, for the 2016-2017 school year, for all grades.

          • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

          • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

          • Spring 2016

            IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth as well as EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 3-5 and EBAE/Nemeth for Grades 6 and up.

        2016-2017 SY

        • September 2016

        Teachers begin UEB instruction for students in grades 6 and up. Begin using available UEB materials.

        • January 2017

          • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

          • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

          • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

          • Spring 2017

            IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

        2017-2018 SY

        • September 2017

          Continue UEB instruction as needed for remaining students, move in and transfer students.

        • January 2018

          • IERC continues transcription of braille requests, not previously transcribed in EBAE, in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

          • Existing materials transcribed in EBAE will continue to be provided in EBAE.

          • Transcription and conversion of instructional materials will be evaluated on the educational needs of each individual student and based on established criteria set by the IERC.

          • Spring 2018

        IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth and EBAE/Nemeth for all grades.

        2018-2019

        • Complete UEB transition. All school-age materials will be produced in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth.  All students who read braille will be expected to access material produced in UEB.

        • Based on availability of UEB, existing materials transcribed in EBAE may continue to be provided.

          • Spring 2019

        IDOE provides state assessments in UEB and/or UEB with Nemeth for all grades.

        UEB Trainings and Learning Opportunities

        Training will be provided by the PASS (Promoting Achievement for Students with Sensory Loss) Project, Blumberg Center, Indiana State University in collaboration with the Indiana Educational Resource Center (IERC) and the PATINS (Promoting Achievement Through Technology and Instruction for all Student) Project, through 2015. Additional trainings after 2015 will be provided as needed.

        • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille (Fall 2014)

        UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille was intended to educate and prepare teachers and staff in order to facilitate a smooth transition from EBAE to UEB.  Six regional trainings provided a comparison of English Braille American Edition (EBAE) and UEB.  Teachers and staff participated in hands-on exercises specific to UEB.

        • UEB Ready? Introduction to Unified English Braille Webinar (Fall 2014)

        A webinar was developed as a resource and for those unable to attend the regional trainings.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:http://dgmpresentations.pbworks.com/w/page/90921945/UEB%20Intro%20Videos

        • UEB Ready? ListServ (Fall 2014)

        An e-mail discussion listserv has been created to provide a communication tool for teachers and staff to ask questions, share resources and strategies, and discuss important issues specific to the implementation of Unified English Braille (UEB).  Transcribers, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals working with students who utilize braille as their literacy mode are participating in this forum.

        • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Directors of Special Education (Fall 2014)

        A webinar was developed to address questions and concerns specific to Directors of Special Education in Indiana regarding the transition to UEB.  To access the webinar, follow the link below:

        https://tegr.it/y/1hqfn

        • UEB Ready?  A Supported Independent Study (Spring 2015 & Summer 2015)

        The PASS Project in conjunction with Indiana State University offered a 13-week training program via distance education utilizing Blackboard.  Participants in the program are using Ashcroft’s Programmed Instruction: Unified English Braille (API-UEB) as a guide to learning UEB.  Throughout the program, instructors answered questions and provided feedback on quizzes prior to the final exam.

        • UEB Ready? Teaching the Technology (Spring 2015)

        This training provided an opportunity for vendors to share information about technology that supports Unified English Braille (UEB).  Participants were presented with the capabilities of various devices and how to utilize these devices with students thereby allowing teachers to make informed recommendations on the device(s) that will best meet the needs of students. This training was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.  Students and their parents are encouraged to attend.

        • UEB Ready? Teaching the Software (Spring 2015)

        In this training, participants learned how to utilize the Duxbury Braille Translation software to become more efficient in their ability to transcribe and produce needed braille instructional materials in UEB.  It was intended for Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision.

        • UEB Ready? The Implementation of Unified English Braille in Indiana: A Webinar for Parents (Fall 2015)

        A webinar was developed with parents in mind directly addressing their questions or concerns regarding the transition to UEB. To access the webinar, follow the link below: http://bit.ly/uebparentwebinar

        • UEB Ready? Teaching the Transition (Fall 2015)

        This training provided strategies and resources to assist Indiana teachers and paraprofessionals working with students who are blind or have low vision when teaching the transition from EBAE to UEB.

        Resources

        The IERC website will post UEB information, resources, and updates. UEB information can be found at the IERC website or by visiting the BANA website:


        UEB Implementation Committee Members

        Leslie Durst, Facilitator - Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center 

        Katie Crawford - BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools 

        Rhoda Davis - Braille Instructor, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        Jim Durst - Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired 

        Robert Eutz - Director, Miami Accessible Media Project (MAMP), Miami Correctional Facility

        Martha LaBounty - Database Librarian, Indiana Educational Resource Center

        Jeanne Lee - BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

        Matt Maurer – Professor, Butler University 

        Bill Powell - BOSMA Enterprises

        Daniel McNulty - Director, PATINS Project

        Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

        Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

        Carol Wetherell - Director, Indiana State University, Blumberg Center

        Kristan Sievers-Coffer - Special Education Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

        Karen Stein - Special Programs Assessment Specialist, Indiana Department of Education

        Marcee Wilburn - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

        Jay Wilson - Principal, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        UEB Implementation Sub-Committee Members

        Marcee Wilburn, Facilitator - Project Coordinator, ISU Blumberg Center, PASS Project

        Lynda Blaising – BLV Consultant, Northeast Indiana Special Education Cooperative

        Katie Crawford – BLV Consultant, Avon Community Schools

        Jim Durst –Superintendent, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        Leslie Durst – Director, Indiana Educational Resource Center

        Nanette Galloway – BLV Consultant, Elkhart County Special Education Cooperative

        Alessandra Kester – BLV HS Life Skills Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        Jeanne Lee – BLV Consultant, Warrick County Schools

        Shelby Metzler – BLV Consultant, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

        Rhonda Rhoades – BLV Consultant, North Central Indiana Special Education Cooperative

        Tiffany Sanders - Director, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Outreach Department

        Betsy Scott - Manager, Braille Project Manager, Indiana Educational Resource Center

        Lisa Starrfield – BLV Mathematics Teacher, Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

        Read more

        App List

        AbleRoad iOS App is a free app and website that enables persons with disabilities to find, rate, and review local shops, restaurants, theaters and other businesses based on their accessibility to persons with mobility, sight, hearing, or cognitive impairments. Requires iOS 5.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information, visit http://www.ableroad.com/ or visit iTunes.

        Access Together, is an app designed to help people with disabilities locate accessible restaurants, shops and other venues in their communities. For more information, visit: http://www.accesstogether.org/.

        AccessNote, an iOS notetaking app for the classroom from the American Foundation for the Blind, is available from the iTunes App store. Cost: $19.99. The app requires iOS 7.1 or later and is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  For more information visit iTunes

        Aipoly Vision (iOS, Free)- Aipoly is an object and color recognizer app that helps persons who are blind, visually impaired, and color blind to understand their surroundings. Simply point your phone at the object of interest and press the large toggle button at the bottom of the screen to turn on the artificial intelligence. Visit iTunes

        AroundMe - App that quickly allows user to find out information about their surroundings.  Free from iTunes.  Works with iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.


        Ballyland Magic App is a new, educational and fun iPad game specifically designed for children who are blind or have low vision, to learn and practice touch gestures for VoiceOver, Apple's built-in screen reader. Visit http://www.ballyland.com/mobile/ballyland-magic-app.php for more information.  

        BARD (Braille and Audio Recording Download)
        which is offered as a way to download audio books and WebBraille files from the National Library Service the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) now is available as a mobile app for iOS from the iTunes and App Store.  To access this free app download visit iTunes. The user guide for the newly released NLS BARD Mobile App can be found at 
        https://nlsbard.loc.gov/apidocs/BARDMobile.userguide.iOS.current.html.


        Better Vision All-in-One Reading App is a mobile app for iOS and Android devices that magnifies text, provides contrast and color filters to improve clarity, and can read text aloud. The Zoom-in Magnification enlarges text and images from 2x to 10x; the reading lamp works on mobile devices that have a built-in light function; the text-to-speech reads text aloud in four languages (English, German, Dutch, and Spanish); and the Contrast Enhancing Filters allow the choice of six color scheme settings, including high contrast white on black. Cost: $5.99 from the app store or on Play Google. For more information, click here.

        Braille Driller- An app for people who want learn the Braille alphabet.  Includes a review of the Braille alphabet and four activities of increasing difficulty. For use on the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

        Braille Now - An app designed to teach sighted persons how to recognize the Braille letters a-z. For use on iPad. $0.99 from iTunes.

        Braille Sonar - This app allows for the lookup of Contracted Braille symbols, somb basic computer braille symbols and Nemeth Code.  Free from iTunes.  Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

        Color ID Free - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.  For use on iPad, iPod Touch(fourth generation and newer), iPad 2 and Android. Free from iTunes.

        Color Identifier - Uses the camera on the iPhone or iPod touch to speak names of colors in real time.$4.99 from iTunes.

        Digit-Eyes - An audio scanner and labeler, enables people without vision to read barcode labels. $9.99 from iTunes.  Requires iOS 6.1 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. 

        Digit-Eyes Lite QR Bar Code Reader and Labeler – Audio scanner and labeler for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Free from iTunes.

        Disney Movies Anywhere App - Every Pixar film is now available with Mobile Audio Description from Disney using the Disney Movies Anywhere app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/disney-movies-anywhere-watch/id766894692?mt=8

        DoItWrite is a clever $1.99 iOS app that helps blind users Learn to draw lowercase letters, uppercase letters, and numbers for use with iOS 7's VoiceOver handwriting feature. Once shapes are learned, users can practice speed and accuracy with a fun game to blast characters as they tumble down the screen. Available through the App Store in iTunes.  Requires iOS 7.0 or later.  Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

        Dragon Dictation - Dictate message and Dragon types it out on the screen.  Options include text message, email, copy-and-past, Facebook, and Twitter.  Works on iPad, iPhone, and on second and third generation iPod Touch (external microphone required).  Free from iTunes

        eMagnifier- Variable zoom from 1x to 8x with option to freeze and save image to camera roll. Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Free from iTunes.

        Eye Note - A mobile device application to denominate paper currency.  For use on iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. Free from iTunes.